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October 30, 2006

Dewey Instruction Schedule: Week of October 30 - November 3

Dewey Graduate Library offers short seminars that can help you get started on your research. Sign up in advance, either here, or in person at the Reference Desk in the Dewey Library.

The following class will be held this week:

Friday, November 3

1:00 pm: Conducting Research from Home

October 23, 2006

Seminars at Dewey: Week of 10/23-10/27

Dewey Graduate Library offers short seminars that can help you get started on your research. Sign up in advance, either here, or in person at the Reference Desk in the Dewey Library.

The following classes will be held this week:

Monday:

No seminars

Tuesday:

No seminars

Wednesday:

1:30om Using Library and Internet Research Resources from Home

Thursday:

No seminars

Friday:

1:00pm Nonprofit Organizations - Information Sources

October 19, 2006

Reference Resource: Punishment In America: A Reference Handbook

Title: Punishment in America: A Reference Handbook.
Author: Cyndi Banks
Publication information: (2005) Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-Clio, Inc.
Dewey Location: REF HV 9466 B35 2005

The idea of punishing people in our society raises many questions. Our first Reference Resource begins to answer such questions as:

“Why should offenders be punished at all? How did punishment originate, and what should be its purpose? Howe does society decide what are the most appropriate ways to punish and how have these methods of punishment changed over time and why? Do we punish because we believe in retribution, or do we just think it is better to lock up all criminals and incapacitate them so they cannot reoffend? ��?

The book is organized into several sections. The first is a section titled: “The History of Punishment in America,��? which discusses: the use of corporal punishment, the growth of the penitentiary, reformatories, and the movement toward rehabilitation and community service. Another section, “Problems, Controversies and Solutions,��? discusses major policy issues surrounding punishment, such as: gender issues, capital punishment, white collar crime, and privatization of prisons. The global perspective is touched upon, and a chronology of major events in the history of punishment is provided. Very brief, one paragraph biographical sketches of notables who influenced our concept of punishment in America include: John Augustus, Alexis de Tocqueville, Thomas Eddy and others. A “Facts and Data��? section gives information on the prison population, number of sex offenders, incarceration rates, and death penalty statistics. In addition, there is a section providing agencies and organizations that deal with this topic, as well as a bibliography of print and non-print resources.

The heart and soul of this book is the section providing the history of punishment in America, and it is a good resource to get the “big picture��? on this important topic. This background information may be helpful to provide the context for an issue that is being researched or possibly help a researcher focus from a broad concept to a research thesis.

You will find this book in the Reference Section of the Dewey Library.


October 16, 2006

Seminars at Dewey: Week of 10/16-10/20

Dewey Graduate Library offers short seminars that can help you get started on your research. Sign up in advance, either here, or in person at the Reference Desk in the Dewey Library.

The following classes will be held this week:

Monday:

No seminars

Tuesday:

No seminars

Wednesday:

1:00pm Social Welfare Research Seminar
4:00pm Nonprofit Organizations - Information Sources

Thursday:

3:00 Using Library and Internet Research Resources from Home

Friday:

1:00pm Introduction to Federal Public Policy Research

October 12, 2006

We're Here to Help - in Person and Online!

The librarians here at Dewey can provide you with many types of assistance with your reasearch. We are glad to help you formulate a research strategy, advise on how to cite your sources, assist with interlibrary loan and document delivery requests, and help you go about identifying relevant materials to support your research topic.

Simply Walk In! The Reference Desk is located to the right of the Circulation area. A reference librarian is at the desk, ready to help you during the following hours:

  • Sunday 1:00pm - 7:00pm

  • Monday through Thursday 9:00am -8:00pm

  • Friday 10:00am - 6:00pm

  • Saturday 12:00pm - 5:00pm
  • Telephone: You can also call the Reference desk at (518) 442-3691. If a librarian does not answer, leave a message and we'll get back to you as soon as we can.

    E-mail: Other times, you may wish to send your question by e-mail. If so, use the Ask A Librarian link on the main library page (http://library.albany.edu). We endeavor to answer your questions within 24 hours of receceiving them, but most questions are answered within a couple of hours.

    October 9, 2006

    Seminars at Dewey: Week of 10/9 - 10/13

    Dewey Graduate Library offers short seminars that can help you get started on your research. Sign up in advance, either here, or in person at the Reference Desk in the Dewey Library.

    The following classes will be held this week:

    Monday:

    Holiday - No Seminars, but Dewey is open for business.

    Tuesday:

    3:30pm Introduction to Federal Public Policy Research
    5:00pm Social Welfare Research Seminar

    Wednesday:

    1:30pm Introduction to Research Databases
    4:30pm Using Library and Internet Research Resources from Home

    Thursday:

    3:30pm Introduction to Research Sources in Information Science

    Friday:

    1:00pm Introduction to Research Databases

    October 5, 2006

    UA Delivery vs. Interlibrary loan

    With a bit of planning, you can obtain almost any article or book that you need for research. UA Delivery and Interlibary Loan are to great ways to retreive that important, but inconveniently located item. You may be wondering, "What is the difference between UA Delivery and Interlibrary Loan, and when can I use those services?"

    The UA Delivery service, (sometimes called "Document Delivery") allows you to obtain materials that are owned by the libraries. For example: you look up a journal in Minerva. You see that it is only available in print. Fear not! You do not have to make a trip to Dewey, Science or the University Library to photocopy this article! Simply log in to ILLiad, then select UA Delivery and request the article. It will be emailed to you within a day or two. If your designated library is the Dewey Library, you may also use UA Delivery to requests books from the uptown campus libraries, including storage. They will be held for you at Dewey. Usually it takes about 3 days for the book to arrive at your desginated library. You may submit up to 3 UA Delivery requests in one day.

    You would place an Interlibrary Loan request when our libraries here at UA do not own the item, or it is not available. Simply sumbit a request by logging in to ILLiad, selecting Interlibrary Loan, and filling out the request form. You do not have to tell us where to find the item, we locate other libraries in our networks, and request the material on your behalf! Depending on the item, it will be emailed to you or placed on hold at your designated pick-up library. It's best to plan adhead: many items are available from ILL within a couple of days, but it can take up to two or three weeks for some hard-to-locate items.

    We are always glad to help with this process, so do not hesitate to write or call. For UA Delivery, contact the Dewey Library Reference Desk at 442-3691, for ILL, call the Interlibrary Loan office, at 442-3613.

    October 1, 2006

    Seminars offered at Dewey: Week of 10/2-10/6

    Dewey Graduate Library offers short seminars that can help you get started on your research. Sign up in advance, either here, or in person at the Reference Desk in the Dewey Library.

    The following classes will be held this week:

    Monday:

    2:00pm, Social Welfare Research Seminar

    Tuesday:

    430pm, Introduction to Research Databases

    Wednesday:

    4:30pm, Overview of Political Science and Public Administration Bibliographic and Full Text Databases

    Thursday:

    4:30pm, Overview of Political Science and Public Administration Bibliographic and Full Text Databases

    Friday:

    1:00pm, Overview of Political Science and Public Administration Bibliographic and Full Text Databases