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October 31, 2008

Photo of the Week

style guides.jpg

The Dewey Library has a variety of style guides in its collection.

These guides can help you correctly cite your sources in a research paper or article.

Photo credit: Morris Stillson

October 30, 2008

There's still time to fill out our survey!

Librarians here at Dewey are interested to learn how you use library resources. Periodically, we will be posting very short surveys to gain an understanding of your research strategies. We are currently asking questions about how you use books in your research. Dewey's book collection is comprehensive in the areas of criminal justice, information studies, public administration and policy, and social welfare. Let us know how you use our book collection by taking this short, anonymous survey:

Click Here to Take Survey

If you have any questions about this survey, please contact Elaine Lasda Bergman at 442-3695 or ebergman@uamail.albany.edu.

October 29, 2008

Get Help With Cited References

‘Tis the season…to write papers! One of the more tricky parts of writing a research paper is using the correct citation format and being consistent throughout. Instead of using guesswork to cite your references, let the University Libraries help you do it the correct way, right from your own computer. At the Libraries Homepage, you will find under Quick Links information on both Citation and Style Guides pages.

Citation generators take your information about a resouce and create bibliographies, notes, and in-tect citations in the format of your choosing. If you’re interested in citation generators, the Citation page lists a variety of citation-generating software, including Son of a Citation Machine, KnightCite and the very popular EndNote. Best of all, most of these generators are free! The Libraries are here to link you up with whichever citation generator you would like to try depending on which style you use.

Into citing references, old-school style? Then the Style Guides page will link you up with online resources to help you get your citation right. Here, you will find a list of the most used style guides in academic writing, including APA and MLA. This link is handy when you are word-processing your paper and you need a quick look-up on citing your research.

Still have a citation question? You can always Ask A Librarian!

Blog post created by Jill Parsons

October 28, 2008

Information Studies Students -- Consider a Professional Association!

As an Information Studies student, you receive many email messages about a number of professional organizations and their various divisions. You might be confused as to what they are all about and why you should join them. Once you graduate and find work, belonging to a professional organization is the best way to keep up with the latest changes in any profession including librarianship.

Participating in a national association such as the American Library Association, reading their publications and attending their conferences keeps you informed of the latest changes in technologies and ideologies. Joining a state association such as the New York Library Association allows you to keep informed of your state government’s support (or lack of thereof) for the local public and school libraries.

You may wish to join one or more sections, divisions or roundtabies within each association, such as those for catalogers, science librarians, or bibliographic instruction librarians. This allows you to meet and learn from your fellow librarians in the same or similar specialized fields.

Here is a list of some of library associations:


The following are local Capital District library associations:

There are even a few student groups on campus:

There is even a social and networking librarian’s group here in the Capital District:

And if you like to travel, there is even an international association:
  • IFLA - International Federation of Library Associations


  • The American Library Association or ALA is a very important association to join if you work in any library setting. This national group produces many useful publications for librarians such as the journals Booklist (containing recommended-only reviews of books, audio books, reference sources, video, and DVD titles) to Choice (containing reviews for collection development and scholarly research).

    Probably the biggest reason to join as a student is because student fees are much cheaper than once you are out working in the field and have to pay regular fees. While some employers will pay for your association fees, others won’t.

    There are a great number of library associations out there. If you are interested in learning about others, check out this link: http://slisweb.sjsu.edu/resources/orgs.htm

    October 26, 2008

    Dewey Workshops for this Week

    Do you want to know more about ‘blogs’, ‘wikis’, and ‘RSS’? You can learn more about all of these items and more by taking the Web to Communicate and Collaborate on Tuesday.

    Are you doing research on nonprofit organizations? Get help by taking Nonprofit Organizations-Information Sources offered this Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday.

    Are you a social welfare student doing research on clinical social work practice? You can get help by taking Evidence Based Practice offered this Wednesday.

    Tuesday 10/28:
    3:30 pm: Using the Web to Communicate and Collaborate
    4:30 pm: Nonprofit Organizations-Information Sources

    Wednesday 10/29:
    2:00 pm: Evidence Based Practice

    Thursday 10/30:
    4:30 pm: Nonprofit Organizations-Information Sources

    Friday 10/31:
    1:00 pm: Nonprofit Organizations-Information Sources

    All classes are held in the classroom in Dewey Library’s basement. You can register for these classes online , at the Reference Desk, by calling the Reference Desk at 422-3691, or by sending email to dewclass@albany.edu.

    If you find that you are unable to attend a class that you have registered for, please call the Reference Desk or send email to let us know.

    Blog post created by Judith Mueller

    October 24, 2008

    Photo of the Week

    helping with books.jpg

    If you can't find a book you're looking for, we're happy to help you search the shelves.

    photo credit: Morris Stilson

    October 22, 2008

    10 Things You May Not Know about the Library (in no particular order)

    1. The Dewey Library specializes in the following subject areas:

    • Law and Public Policy/Administration
    • Social Welfare
    • Criminal Justice
    • Library and Information Studies

    In addition, Dewey houses many other cross-disciplinary resources available both online and in print.

    2. Coincidentally, if you need help researching in any of the above areas, contact one of Dewey Library’s bibliographers. Check out the Dewey Library subject specialists page and make an appointment today to learn more about researching in any of these particular areas.

    3. Technology Consultants are available at Dewey for those times you’re having problems with certain programs, such as Microsoft Word, Adobe, etc. ITS consultants are available at the library seven days a week.

    4. The Dewey Library is equipped with more than just computers, photocopiers and printers. There is a scanner, color printer and microfilm reader/printer all located on the main floor. This technology may also be available at the other two university libraries.

    5. Are you a faculty member? There is a faculty resources page just for you! Educate yourself on everything from placing books on reserve to information on promotion and tenure.

    6. You might think the Dewey Library’s name has something to do with the Dewey Decimal System. While that would be fitting, the library is actually named after New York state governor Thomas Edmund Dewey, who served from 1943-1955. Governor Dewey recommended that New York create its own State University, so on September 8, 1988, the Dewey Graduate Library adopted his name in dedication. To learn more, see Governor Dewey’s biography on the Dewey homepage.

    7. Also of historical mention are the stained glass windows that so beautifully decorate the Dewey walls on the main floor. The windows themselves are gifts of various graduating classes from 1910-1929. However, history on some of the windows remains a mystery. Photos of the Dewey windows are uploaded to Flickr and each image includes the story and meaning behind each window.

    8. In addition to borrowing books at Dewey, you may also check out other various items such as earphones and a laptop. If ever you forget yours at home, let the circulation staff at Dewey come to your rescue.

    9. Dewey and the other university libraries have a wealth of software available on terminals in the Information Commons. These programs may be costly to purchase for your own personal computer, so let Dewey offer them to you, just for being a student! And while you’re at it, check to see which computers are being occupied at any given time.

    10. You can tell us what you think about the Dewey Library! If ever you have a suggestion or a comment about our services, you may submit a suggestion online or leave a comment on this blog.

    Blog post created by Jill Parsons

    October 21, 2008

    Doing Criminal Justice Research?

    The University at Albany Libraries subscribe to the National Criminal Justice Reference Service (NCJRS). NCJRS provides a comprehensive bibliographic database that is federally funded and contains justice and abuse information from many different government agencies and organizations. This database contains summaries of the more than 200,000 criminal justice, juvenile justice, and substance abuse resources that make up the NCJRS Library collection.

    You can access this database by first going to the library’s Databases & Indexes page and selecting ‘N’. From here you can choose to use NCJRS using either the Cambridge Scientific Abstracts (CSA) interface or by going directly to the US Department of Justice web site. Either way, you have access to many resources including federal, state, and local government reports, books, research reports, journal articles, and unpublished research produced since 1975.

    If you need more help with Criminal Justice research, stop by the reference desk or contact Mary Jane Brustman (mbrustman@uamail.albany.edu) to set up an appointment.

    Blog post created by Judith Mueller

    October 19, 2008

    Free Classes at Dewey this Week

    This week’s free workshops offered at Dewey include Introduction to Federal Public Policy Research, Introduction to Research Databases, and Evidence Based Practice.

    Do you need help doing research? Try taking Introduction to Research Databases offered Wednesday.

    Are you doing research on federal public policies? Get help by taking Introduction to Federal Public Policy Research offered this Tuesday.

    Are you a social welfare student doing research on clinical social work practice? You can get help by taking Evidence Based Practice offered this Wednesday.

    Tuesday 10/21:
    4:30 pm: Introduction to Federal Public Policy Research

    Wednesday 10/22:
    10:00 am: Introduction to Research Databases
    2:00 pm: Evidence Based Practice

    All classes are held in the classroom in Dewey Library’s basement. You can register for these classes online, at the Reference Desk, by calling the Reference Desk at 422-3691, or by sending email to dewclass@albany.edu.

    If you find that you are unable to attend a class that you have registered for, please call the Reference Desk or send email to let us know.

    Blog post created by Judith Mueller

    October 17, 2008

    Photo of the Week

    Brustman and Bergman.jpg

    Mary Jane Brustman (on the left) has taken on additional administrator responsibilities, and will be based at the uptown campus. Elaine Lasda Bergman (on the right) will assume the role of Social Welfare Bibliographer.

    Photo credit: Morris Stilson

    October 15, 2008

    Downstairs at Dewey for Quiet Study, Groups

    Downstairs at Dewey, we offer both a quiet area to study as well as two areas where groups can study together. If you are looking for a quiet place to study, try the basement at Dewey Library. This area is expected to be quiet so that everyone can study without distraction.

    If you have group projects that you need to work on with other people and with access to computers, try either the study area located in the room (peristyle) across from the downstairs classroom.

    Also,when the classroom is not needed for a class, you can check out the key to the room from the circulation desk, and use it to practice presentations or work on computers in a group. To reserve the classroom in advance, please contact Deborah Bernnard.

    All the new computers downstairs have the ITS supplied software that has previously only been available on the main floor at Dewey and at other locations on campus.
    So whether you need to study in peace and quiet or you need to study with fellow classmates, check out Dewey Library’s basement.

    Blog post created by Judith Mueller

    October 14, 2008

    Mary Jane Brustman is Moving Up

    Mary Jane Brustman, longtime Social Welfare bibliographer and Head of the Dewey Library, has been asked to take on increased management responsibilities within the University Libraries. We wish her well as she moves on to these expanded responsibilities. Although she will still be down at the Dewey Library a couple of afternoons a week, most of her time will be spent at the uptown campus.

    As a result of this change, Elaine Lasda Bergman will be assuming the role of Bibliographer for Social Welfare. Already the bibliographer for Gerontology and Reference, we feel assured that Elaine will continue the high level of service and assistance with research that Mary Jane has provided to the students, staff and faculty of the School of Social Welfare. You may contact Elaine by email: ebergman@uamail.albany.edu or by calling her at 442-3695.

    October 12, 2008

    This Week's Workshops at Dewey

    This week’s workshops at Dewey include Introduction to EndNote®, Introduction to Research Databases, Introduction to Federal Public Policy Research, and Minerva, University at Albany’s Online Catalog.

    Tuesday 10/14:
    10:00 am: Introduction to EndNote® - for help with creating bibliographies

    Wednesday 10/15:
    4:30 pm: Introduction to Research Databases – for help with doing research

    Thursday 10/16:
    4:30 pm: Introduction to Federal Public Policy Research – for help with doing federal public policy research

    Friday 10/17:
    1:00 pm: Introduction to Federal Public Policy Research - for help with doing federal public policy research
    3:30 pm: Minerva, University at Albany’s Online Catalog – for help with our online catalog

    All classes are held in the classroom in Dewey Library’s basement. You can register for these classes online , at the Reference Desk, by calling the Reference Desk at 422-3691, or by sending email to dewclass@albany.edu.

    If you find that you are unable to attend a class that you have registered for, please call the Reference Desk or send email to let us know.

    Blog post created by Judith Mueller

    October 10, 2008

    Photo of the Week

    its consultant.jpg

    In addition to providing research assistance by librarians, we also provide computer assistance by ITS Helpdesk assistants.

    Photo credit: Xiaoai Ren

    October 9, 2008

    Using Dewey Survey: Book Survey

    Librarians here at Dewey are interested to learn how you use library resources. Periodically, we will be posting very short surveys to gain an understanding of your research strategies. This week, we are asking questions about how you use books in your research. Dewey's book collection is comprehensive in the areas of criminal justice, information studies, public administration and policy, and social welfare. Let us know how you use our book collection by taking this short, anonymous survey:

    Click Here to Take Survey

    If you have any questions about this survey, please contact Elaine Lasda Bergman at 442-3695 or ebergman@uamail.albany.edu.

    October 8, 2008

    Research Help Available on Library Website

    Grad students – this blog is for you! Did you know the University Libraries has a webpage for tutorials and even more pointers on getting your research going? Check out the UA Libraries' User Education Homepage .

    Tutorials are a great way to learn more about making the most of your research. Librarians have created interactive tutorials on virtual library tours, plagiarism and even web design. Best of all, you can take them on your own time wherever you’d like. These simple tutorials might be just what you need to ace your next research assignment.

    Iguides offer online tips on doing internet research with some in-depth descriptions of some helpful websites, such as Ask.com. The Internet is a wonderful source of information, but as you might know, finding valuable information is tricky. Let this page help you make the most of internet research.

    Also on this page are resources to help you cite works in your paper, get through the research process and find more information information on miscellaneous topics, such as speeches, literary criticism and grant information.

    Finally, you should know that Dewey Library has their research guides in criminal justice and social welfare online. You can access these electronic handouts at the Dewey Graduate Library Handouts page found on the workshops page.

    Feel free to visit any of these links and see how they can help your next project.

    Blog post created by Jill Parsons

    October 7, 2008

    New Book for Students Interested in Government Information

    A new book available at Dewey Library entitled Managing Electronic Government Information in Libraries: Issues and Practices will interest students who need to work with or access government information electronically. Information Science students interested in working as government documents librarians as well as those interested in working as reference, map, digital, or technical services librarians may also find this book useful.

    Since this book was edited by Andrea M. Morrison for the Government Documents Round Table of ALA, its focus is on discussing the issues of electronic government collections specifically for depository libraries. However, it provides useful information for all types of libraries. With the government providing information electronically more and more, the issues of providing access to it becomes a concern for all. For example, in the past you could find the printed IRS tax forms at most public libraries. Now, since the IRS has stopped printing most specialized forms, public librarians need to know how to access these forms for their patrons.

    This book also provides guidance for implementing and improving services for various populations like the underserved, young adults, and children. It also touches upon collection development, bibliographic control as well as integrating electronic government documents into reference services. It discusses the managing of local, state, federal, as well as international electronic government resources as well.

    Managing Electronic Government Information in Libraries: Issues and Practices currently is shelved in the New Books Display behind the monitor on the first floor but later will be shelved at Dewey Z 688 G6 M37 2008.

    Blog post created by Judith Mueller

    October 5, 2008

    This Week's Free Workshops at Dewey

    Social Welfare students if you haven’t taken the Social Welfare Research Seminar yet, there are only two more sessions this semester. This week’s Social Welfare Research Seminar is offered on Wednesday at 4:30 pm.

    Researchers, if you want to learn how to use EndNote® to easily compile your bibliography, we are offering the Introduction to EndNote® workshop on Tuesday at 4:30.

    Tuesday 10/7:
    4:30 pm: Introduction to EndNote®

    Wednesday 10/8:
    4:30 pm Social Welfare Research Seminar

    To check out the full schedule of workshops offered at Dewey, see the online listing. All classes are held in the classroom in Dewey Library’s basement. You can register for these classes online, at the Reference Desk, by calling the Reference Desk at 422-3691, or by sending email to dewclass@albany.edu.

    If you find that you are unable to attend a class that you have registered for, please call the Reference Desk or send email to let us know.

    Blog post created by Judith Mueller

    October 3, 2008

    Photo of the Week

    ryan at circ.jpg>

    Faculty can assign graduate assistants proxy borrowing rights for their accounts. Just have the student come to the circulation desk and fill out a form.

    Photo credit: Morris Stilson

    October 1, 2008

    New Display at Dewey

    Election season is in full swing. Want to learn more about voting and HAVA, the Help America Vote Act? Then make sure to check out the brand new display at the Dewey Library in front of the circulation desk.

    The Help America Vote Act is a Federal Law to enable electronic voting machines and enact voting standards for each election. There are a few controversies surrounding HAVA, so make sure to take a look at the news headlines and images in the display case. Want to learn more? Pick up the HAVA resource guide at the display.

    Also, you will discover many resources for you to take advantage of, including voter registration forms (in both English and Spanish), and a bibliography of important sources for HAVA information. Be sure you’re registered for this upcoming historical presidential election!

    Finally, you will definitely want to take part in Dewey Library’s Unofficial Presidential Election. Cast your vote at the ballot box and vote for who you want to be President! We will reveal the results here at the Dewey Blog when the election is over. (Unlike the real election you do not have to be a citizen to participate!)

    Tell us, what do you think of our display? Leave a comment on this blog or stop by the Reference Desk!

    Blog post created by Jill Parsons