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February 27, 2009

Photo of the Week

colored printer small.jpg

For eye catching printouts, try the color printer.

Photo Credit: Morris Stilson

February 26, 2009

Your Turn

This week, we would like to know your thoughts on the environment and ambience Dewey. Are the variety of seating arrangements sufficient? Is the library quiet enough? Do you use the group study space in the peristyle? How could we improve the environment for research and study to better meet your needs? Is the ambience conducive to your productivity? Feel free to comment on this blog by clicking on the purple "Comments" link in the lower right below this post.

February 25, 2009

Take Your Projects to a Colorful, New Level.

Color printing can enhance any paper or presentation for class, and fortunately for you, Dewey owns it’s very own color printer. Copies are $.50 a page and works just as the other printers do while using computers in the Dewey commons. Where is the printer located? It is right in front of the new books shelf, or just to the left of the reference collection behind the slide show monitor.

Be sure to also check out the libraries' policy page on printing.

Blog post created by Jill Parsons

February 24, 2009

Criminal Justice Students doing Research look no Further!

If you are doing research in criminal justice, you might want to check out the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) database . This database “is the world’s largest archive of digital social science data.��? It is a part of the University of Michigan’s Institute for Social Research.. ICPSR’s mission is to acquire, preserve, and distribute original data as well as to provide training in its analysis. Since the University at Albany is a member of ICPSR, most of the files in the archive are free to download. This data is in a form that can be used with statistical software such as SAS, SPSS, and Stata. If you are a researcher willing to let others access your data, you can contribute your data to ICPSR as well. ICPSR also contains data in the fields of sociology, political science, demography, history, economics, gerontology, public health, education, and international relations.

You can access the ICPSR database from the Databases & Indexes page by either typing in “ICPSR��? in the “Find a database��? field or by selecting the letter “I��? in the “Browse by database title��? field.
The data from ICPSR can also be accessed from National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD) which is also sponsored by the University at Michigan. This database is funded by ICPSR, as well as the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the U.S. Department of Justice, and the National Institute of Justice.

To access the data of interest to criminal justice students, on the ICPSR home page display the “Our Research��? menu at the top of the screen and select : Research Projects. Then display the menu in the “Show me all items related to : field and select “Criminology and Criminal Justice��? and select the “Go��? button.

The following projects are displayed:
• CrimeStat –is a spatial statistics program for the analysis of crime incident locations.( http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/CRIMESTAT/)
• Minority Data Resource Center (MDRC) – is an archive that provides data resources for the comparative analysis of issues affecting racial and ethnic minority populations in the United States. (http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/MDRC/)
• National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD) – contains over 700 data collections related to criminal justice. (http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/NACJD/)
• Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) – is a large scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development.( http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/PHDCN/)
• Terrorism & Preparedness Data Resource Center (TPDRC) – archives and distributes data collected by government agencies, non-governmental agencies, and researchers about the nature of domestic and international terrorism incidents, organizations, perpetrators, and victims. (http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/TPDRC/)

The ICPSR contact here at the University at Albany Libraries is the librarian Lorre Smith. Earlier this month she held two classes that gave a brief introduction to ICPSR, how to search the archives, and how to download data. If you missed these classes and would like some help with learning more about ICPSR, feel free to contact Lorre Smith in the Science Library by phone (437-3946) or by email (lsmith@uamail.albany.edu).

Blog post created by Judith Mueller

February 22, 2009

Dewey Workshops -- Week of February 23-27, 2009

If you are a social welfare student doing research on clinical social work practice, you can get help by taking Evidence Based Practice offered this Tuesday at 10:00 am.

For help with doing federal public policy research, we suggest you take the Introduction to Federal Public Policy Research workshop offered this week on Tuesday at 4:30 pm, Thursday at 4:30 pm, and on Friday at 10:00 am.

If you want to learn how to use EndNote® to easily compile your bibliographies, we are offering the Introduction to EndNote® workshop on Wednesday at 2:00 pm.

If you need help with your research in general, try taking Introduction to Research Databases offered Wednesday at 3:30 pm, and Thursday at 3:00 pm.

Tuesday February 24, 2009
10:00 am – Evidence Based Practice
4:30 pm – Introduction to Federal Public Policy

Wednesday February 25, 2009
2:00 pm - Introduction to EndNote®
3:30 pm – Introduction to Research Databases

Thursday February 26, 2009
3:00 - Introduction to Research Databases
4:30 – Introduction to Federal Public Policy

Friday February 27, 2009
10:00 am - Introduction to Federal Public Policy

To check out the workshops offered at Dewey, see the online listing. All classes are held in the classroom in Dewey Library’s basement. You can register for these classes online, at the Reference Desk, by calling the Reference Desk at 422-3691, or by sending email to Dewclass@albany.edu. If you find that you are unable to attend a class that you have registered for, please call the Reference Desk or send email to let us know.


Blog post created by Judith Mueller

February 20, 2009

The Van Ingen Murals at Dewey

While compiling items for our new display on FDR, we decided to find more information about William B. Van Ingen, painter of the murals adorning the walls of the Dewey Library of Hawley Hall. I personally had a chance to talk with Brian Keough, Head of the M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections & Archives here at the University at Albany. Here’s what he found out while researching our archives for display material:

The Hawley Murals were painted and installed in 1935-1938 as a U.S. Works
Projects Administration project by William B. Van Ingen. The WPA's
Federal Project Number One, known as Federal One, was the largest and
most important of Roosevelt's New Deal cultural programs. Prior to the
Hawley murals, Van Ingen was commissioned by the U.S. Government to
paint murals in the Panama Canal Administration Building in completed in
1915. He also received commissions to paint murals in the Library of
Congress, the Pennsylvania State Capitol, the New Jersey State Capitol,
the U.S. Mint in Philadelphia, and Federal buildings in Chicago and
Indianapolis.

Brian also mentioned about the items Special Collections houses right in the archives:

We have very few items from the period that the murals were being
created and installed, except for a few articles in the student
newspaper (which reported some incorrect information) and a 1945 letter
from Van Ingen to the Library Director Mary E. Cobb describing his ideas
for the murals. We have considerably more material on the 1974
restoration of the murals including images of the murals and people
restoring them.

To research our archives on this or other topics, visit the Special Collections homepage for more information. Don’t forget to check out their blog as well!

Blog post created by Jill Parsons

Photo of the Week

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A sample of some of the books we get from interlibrary loan and the libraries they come from.

Photo credit: Morris Stilson

February 18, 2009

Scouring the Ends of the Earth!

Have you ever been disappointed to learn that your library does not own the item you are looking for, thinking you must now make trips to many different libraries in your area to find that item? If so, read on.

When you know the library does not own the item you need, make an Interlibrary Loan, aka ILL, request and let us find it for you—you don’t even have to leave home! When you login to ILLIAD , fill out information on the item you are looking for and submit your request. From there, you ILL staff will search certain databases and library networks to see which libraries own this item. From there, they will ask a library to loan the item out to your institution. Sometimes the item is owned by a local library. However, sometimes your item might be owned by a library across the country! No matter what library houses the item, if they participate in ILL, they will send that item to your library and it will eventually wind up in your hands. In fact, UAlbany has seen ILL items come in all the way from Europe and Japan. The ILL department will try every library that owns the material until they are able to obtain it for you.
Keep in mind, ILL is not just for books. If you need an article from a journal that the University Libraries does not own, you can submit a request to get that article as well.

You can also make requests directly from Worldcat, which is a database of participating library catalogs. Simply click on the "Submit Request to UAlbany" link at the top of the item record, and a new window will pop up which allows you to log in to ILLiad. Once logged in, the record will be filled out for you, simply give it a quick scan to make sure the form is correct, and click "Submit."

So, who is eligible for ILL? How long does it take? Are there any exceptions? For the answer to more questions like these, see our ILL FAQ page.

Lastly, if you need help signing up with ILLIAD or making a request once you are in there, ask a reference librarian for help.

Blog post created by Jill Parsons

February 17, 2009

Ethical Decision Making for Social Workers

Ethical decision making is a very important part of social work. Ethical dilemmas can come up in myriad situations, such as those which involve: personal relationships with current and former clients; client refusal of services; cultural sensitivity issues; end of life decision making; and privacy protection in counseling and research study design. Social welfare students have a number of resources to help them research ethical decision making in a social work environment.

The National Association of Social Workers has published a Code of Ethics, and the International Federation of Social Workers also has an Ethics Document which provide guidelines for ethical decision making.

The database Social Work Abstracts has a number of articles on this topic. To locate the database, go to the library's Database Finder and click on the letter "S" at the bottom of the page. Use keyword searches such as ethics, or more precisely “ethical dilemmas,��? or “ethical decision making.��?

In addition the Libraries have a number of recently published books which students of social work ethics may find useful:

Banks, Sarah. (2006) Ethics and values in social work. New York: Palgrave MacMillan.
Dewey Library / HV 10.5 B335X 2006

Guttmann, David. (2006) Ethics in social work : a context of caring. New York: Haworth Press.
Dewey Library / HV 40 G98 2006

Reamer, Frederic G. (2006) Social work values and ethics. New York: Columbia University Press.
Dewey Library / HV 10.5 R427 2006

International Federation of Social Workers. (2007) International definition of the social work profession; Ethics in social work, statement of principles; Global standards for the education and training of the social work profession. Berne, Switzerland: International Federation of Social Workers.
Dewey Library / HV 40 I548X 2007

And, Coming Soon:
Gambrill, Eileen, ed. (2009)Social work ethics. Burlington, VT: Ashgate.
Dewey Library/ On Order

If you have any questions about researching ethics from a social welfare perspective, please contact Social Welfare Bibliographer Elaine Bergman (phone: 442-3695, email: ebergman@uamail.albany.edu), or stop by the Reference Desk.

February 15, 2009

Social Welfare Research Seminars Offered This Week at Dewey Library

Social Welfare students if you graduate this May and haven’t yet taken the Social Welfare Research Seminar yet, we suggest that you sign up as soon as possible since these workshops fill up fast. This week we are offering the Social Welfare Research Seminar on Tuesday at 2:00 pm, and Thursday at 10 am.

Tuesday February 17, 2009
2:00 pm - Social Welfare Research Seminar

Thursday February 19, 2009
10:00 am – Social Welfare Research Seminar

To check out the workshops offered at Dewey, see the online listing. All classes are held in the classroom in Dewey Library’s basement. You can register for these classes online, at the Reference Desk, by calling the Reference Desk at 422-3691, or by sending email to Dewclass@albany.edu. If you find that you are unable to attend a class that you have registered for, please call the Reference Desk or send email to let us know.


Blog post created by Judith Mueller

February 13, 2009

Photo of the Week

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Paul takes a look at one of our new books. The New Books Shelf is located behind the color printer -- go to the reference desk and turn right.

Photo credit: Morris Stilson

February 12, 2009

Your Turn: Let us know what you think!

You may have noticed that the main library website (http://library.albany.edu) has been redesigned. We hope you find the layout more intuitive and are better able to find the resources you need. The University Libraries provides a great deal of information on its library website, and we want to know how YOU feel about the redesign. Do you like the look of the page? Can you find what you need on our site? What do you think of the navigation, images, and content?

If you have an opinion on the website redesign, please leave a comment on this blog to let us know your thoughts. To comment, click on the word "comments" just below this post. We are always interested in your feedback, and we look forward to hearing from you!

Franklin Delano Obama?

Next time you’re at Dewey, look at the new display in the case. This time around, we are showcasing President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s policies and early comparisons to Obama. Also, make sure to check out the information on the Dewey Murals, which were funded by a grant from the Works Progress Administration (WPA). In the next week or so, we will post about William VanIngen and the painting of the Dewey murals.
Feel free to take a resource handout on FDR as well!

February 11, 2009

New books? Where?

Dewey Library is always adding new books to its collection and luckily for you, they are conveniently located on one groups of shelves on the main floor. Not sure exactly where it is? Here are some points of interest: Once you find the reference collection in the center of the main floor, look to your left and you will see the new books shelf. It is directly to the right of the color printer, which sits right behind the TV monitor playing the slide show.

Now that you’ve found the shelf, here are some new books you might want to check out:

Shanachie Tour: A Library Road Trip Across America (Z 720 A46 N4 2008)

Serving Urban Teens ( Z 718.5 B74 2008)

The Emotionally Intelligent Social Worker (HV40.35 H69 2008)

Retooling for an Aging America: Building the Health Care Workforce (RA564.8 .R48 2008)

DARFUR: The Long Road to Disaster (DT546.48 .B87 2008)

Biological Weapons: From the Invention of State-Sponsored Programs to Contemporary Bioterrorism (UG447.8 G85 2005)

Unlike some libraries, the borrowing period for new books is the same as that of the regular circulating collection. Stop by and browse the new book shelf -- you never know what you might find!

Blog post created by Jill Parsons

February 10, 2009

Where have all of President George W. Bush’s papers gone?

Now that we have a new president, what happens to all of President George W. Bush’s papers from his eight years in office? Eventually, they will be available in his Presidential Library. Until then, an archivist in the National Archives and Records Administration takes possession of all of his papers and artifacts and maintains them in a temporary depository. George W. Bush’s temporary depository is currently in Lewisville, Texas. The permanent location will eventually be on the Southern Methodist University campus. Public access to his records is governed by the Presidential Records Act (PRA) passed in 1978. This act states that George W. Bush’s records are not available for public access until January 20, 2014 (5 years after the end of his Administration). The PRA also changed the legal status of the Presidential and Vice Presidential materials. Under this act, the official records of the President and his staff are owned by the United States, not by the President. These records are eligible for access under the Freedom of Information act (FOIA), but the President can restrict access to specific kinds of information for up to 12 years after he leaves office.

The Presidential Libraries Act (44 U.S.C 2108) of 1955 established the Presidential Library System. These libraries are Presidential Archival Depositories and are part of the National Archives System. They provide for the transfer of Presidential papers and artifacts to the Federal Government. While the libraries are privately built, they are maintained by the federal government. While the act was signed into law by President Eisenhower in 1955, there are Presidential libraries for President Herbert Hoover, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Harry S. Truman who all came before him. The Presidential Libraries Act was amended in 1986 (PL 99-323, H.R. 1349) and made significant changes to the Presidential Libraries including requiring private endowments linked to the size of the facility. The National Archives website provides information about the various laws and regulations governing the operation and access to presidential libraries.

As far as the Presidential libraries are concerned, there are three types of Presidential materials. The law that applies depends on how the materials are defined and the year it was created. Until the Reagan administration, materials created during the presidency, with the exception of Nixon, were considered personal property of the President or his staff and were considered donated historical materials. The acceptance of these collections is covered by the PLA of 1955 and may include any restrictions on access to these materials set by the donors. Thus some materials may not be available for research. However, the PRA in 1978 changed the legal status of Presidential and Vice Presidential materials. Under this law, the official records are owned by the United States. These records are available for access under the FOIA. Only the Nixon Presidential Historical Materials are governed by the Presidential Recordings and Materials Preservation Act (PRMPA) of 1974.

A few books on Presidential Libraries that we have here in Dewey Library are:


  • Presidential Libraries and Collections by Fritz Veil – Dewey Library / CD 3029.82 V45 1987

  • Records of the Presidency : Presidential Papers and Libraries from Washington to Reagan by Frank L. Schick with Renee Schick and Mark Carroll – Dewey Library / Reference : CD 3029.82 S35 1989

  • Presidential Papers and the Presidential Library System by Jannean L. Elliott – Dewey Library / CD 330299.82 E44 1981

  • The History and Organization of the Franklin D. Roosevelt Library, Hyde Park, New York (microform) by Frances Bromiley – Dewey Library / Microfiche: Z 674 A88X No. 117

Information about the thirteen Presidential Libraries can be found at the following links:


Blog post created by Judith Mueller

February 8, 2009

Free Workshops Offered at Dewey: Week of February 9-13, 2009

Information Science students doing research might want to take the Introduction to Research Sources in Information Science workshop offered on Tuesday at 10:00 am.

If you want to learn how to use EndNote® to easily compile your bibliographies, we are offering the Introduction to EndNote® workshop on Wednesday at 2:00 pm.

Are you a social welfare student doing research on clinical social work practice? You can get help by taking Evidence Based Practice offered this Wednesday at 4:00 pm.

Social Welfare students, if you graduate this May and haven’t yet taken the Social Welfare Research Seminar yet, we suggest that you sign up as soon as possible since these seminars fill up fast. This week’s Social Welfare Research Seminar is offered on Thursday at 2:00 pm.

Tuesday February 10, 2009
10:00 am – Introduction to Research Sources in Information Science

Wednesday February 11, 2009
2:00 pm - Introduction to EndNote®
4:00 pm – Evidence Based Practice

Thursday February 12, 2009
2:00 pm – Social Welfare Research Seminar

To check out the workshops offered at Dewey, see the online listing. All classes are held in the classroom in Dewey Library’s basement. You can register for these classes online, at the Reference Desk, by calling the Reference Desk at 422-3691, or by sending email to Dewclass@albany.edu. If you find that you are unable to attend a class that you have registered for, please call the Reference Desk or send email to let us know.

Blog post created by Judith Mueller

February 6, 2009

Quotations

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Some library "mascots" guard a few of our resources for finding quotations.

Photo credit: Morris Stilson

February 4, 2009

Reference Resources: Finding Quotations

“I don't know the key to success, but the key to failure is trying to please everybody.��?

Can you identify who said the above statement? If not, you should check out our many resources on finding famous quotations, or who has spoken a particular saying. The University Libraries new homepage has an Online Reference section where you can go to “Quotations��? and find many online sources for popular quotation. These online dictionaries are helpful in that you can find the information you are looking for, whether you already have a quote but don’t know the person who spoke it, or vice versa. Also, if you are looking for quotes on specific subjects, such as love or success, you can search under those themes and pick ones yourself. The database CredoReference offers many quotations resources, such as Bloomsbury Biographical Dictionary of Quotations and Collins Concise Dictionary of Quotations. There are also links to other free online sources such as Quoteworld and Bartlett's Familiar Quotations.

In addition to our online resources, Dewey owns many reference books to research quotations. Check out the following:

The Quotable Book Lover (Ref PN 6084 B65 Q68 1999) contains quotes and famous sayings about reading and loving books.

The Quotable Woman (Ref PN 6081.5 N49 1992) is quotes said by only women.

The Oxford Dictionary of Political Quotations (Ref PN6084 P6 O94 2005) not only provides political quotes but by whom they were said, when and where.

Bartlett’s Familiar Quotations (Ref PN 6081 B27 1992) is in print, 16th edition with the most updated version found online.

And the mystery person who said the opening quote? Bill Cosby.

Blog post created by Jill Parsons

February 3, 2009

Finding Executive Orders

President Obama has already signed several significant Executive Orders since taking the oath of office. But what exactly is an Executive Order?

Without any action from Congress or the House of Representatives, the President can issue orders for certain actions to be taken. This is called an Executive Order and can occur due to certain statutory powers already in place. The governmental archives website defines an Executive Order in more formal terms: ��?Executive Orders are official documents, numbered consecutively, through which the President of the United States manages the operations of the Federal Government.��? Perhaps the best example of a recent Executive Order made by President Obama was the decision to close the facilities at Guantanamo Bay, made on January 22, 2009.

There are several places one can find the actual text of an Executive Order. Online, the White House’s official site gives a briefing and the full text of the official documents. They also appear daily in the Federal Register since the order itself is received from the President in the Office of the Federal Register. They also appear in Title 3 of the CFR, or Code of Federal Regulations. CFR can be found in Dewey Reference at LAW KJ 70 A3.

Still confused about Executive Orders? Please check out some books we have that can better explain to you what executive orders are all about:

By Order of the President: The Use and Abuse of Executive Direct Action
(Phillip J. Cooper)
KF5053 C578 2002

Executing the Constitution: Putting the President Back into the Constitution
(Christopher S. Kelley, editor)
JK511 E93 2006

Executive Orders and the Modern Presidency: Legislating from the Oval Office
(Adam L. Warber)
JK516 W35 2006

Policy by Other Means: Alternative Adoption by Presidents
(Steven A. Shull)
JK511 S54 2006

Power Without Persuasion: The Politics of Direct Presidential Action
(William G. Howell)
KF5053 H68 2003

Lastly, feel free to contact our Law and Public Administration Bibliographer, Dick Irving at 442-3698 and at rirving@uamail.albany.edu. Or, ask at the reference desk!

Blog post created by Jill Parsons

February 1, 2009

Free Workshops Offered at Dewey Library the Week of February 2-6, 2009

This week’s workshops offered at Dewey Library include Introduction to ICPSR (Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research), Social Welfare Research Seminar, and Introduction to Research Databases.

Social Welfare and Criminal Justice students interested in research might be interested in learning more about how to use the ICPSR database. ICPSR’s mission statement is “ICPSR provides leadership and training in data access, curation, and methods of analysis for a diverse and expanding social science research community.��? We are offering the workshop Introduction to ICPSR on Wednesday at 1:00 pm, and on Friday at 10:00 am.

Social Welfare students if you graduate this May and haven’t yet taken the Social Welfare Research Seminar yet, we suggest that you sign up as soon as possible since these seminars fill up fast. This week’s Social Welfare Research Seminar is offered on Wednesday at 4:00 pm.

If you are doing research and would like some pointers on how to use our databases, take Introduction to Research Databases offered this Thursday at 4:00 pm.

Wednesday February 4th
1:00 pm – Introduction to ICPSR
4:00 pm - Social Welfare Research Seminar

Thursday February 5th
4:00 pm- Introduction to Research Databases

Friday February 6th
10:00 am - Introduction to ICPSR

To check out the comnplete schedule of workshops offered at Dewey, see the online listing. All classes are held in the classroom in Dewey Library’s basement. You can register for these classes online, at the Reference Desk, by calling the Reference Desk at 422-3691, or by sending email to Dewclass@albany.edu. If you find that you are unable to attend a class that you have registered for, please call the Reference Desk or send email to let us know.


Blog post created by Judith Mueller