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April 29, 2009

Faculty Due Date is Today

All factulty who have checked books out of the library must either return or renew them today. Please contact the library Circulation desk at 442-3693 with any questions.

Five Ways to Ask a Librarian for Help.

Are you aware of all the different ways to go about asking a librarian for assistance? Whether you have a simple question about Document Delivery or need in-depth research consultation, here are five ways to ask us for help no matter where you are:

1. In Person: A tried and true way, you can still walk up to the reference desk in the library and ask us face-to-face for assistance. Our reference hours at Dewey are Monday – Thursday 10am – 8pm, Friday 1pm-5pm, Saturday Noon- 5pm and Sunday 1pm-7pm. Stop on by (and no, you’re not bothering us)!

2. Phone: Not at the Dewey library? Pick up your phone and give us a call at 442-3691 during the above reference hours, or while you’re at it…

3. …Text us your question at 265010! Please start your text with “ualibraries:" (don't forget to include the colon) and then write your question. This service is available Monday – Thursday 10:00am - 9:00pm, Friday
10:00am - 4:00pm, Saturday, 1:00pm - 5:00pm and Sunday 1:00pm - 9:00pm.

4. Emaill: Use the very popular “Ask a Librarian��? service to email us 24 hours a day. We promise to get back to you as soon as possible, no more than 24 hours after your question during normal operating hours.

5.Instant Message: During “texting��? hours, send us an instant message from your home computer and get an instant answer.

With all these different ways to ask librarians for help, there’s no reason you shouldn’t! We’re here to help you with anything you need so you can do your best. We look forward to hearing from you!

April 28, 2009

Faculty Due Date is Thursday

Just a reminder: all materials currently on loan to faculty are due back Thursday, April 30. You may renew your materials either in person or online.

Ph.D candidates have a fixed due date of May 31. Loans to Masters' students are for 90 days from checkout.

We appreciate your efforts to return or renew books in a timely manner. Questions about the library's lending policy? Check out our Circulation Services page, or call us at 442-3693.

April 26, 2009

Free Workshops Offered at Dewey Library the Week of April 27-May 1, 2009

This week’s workshops offered at Dewey Library include Conducting Research from Home and Introduction to EndNote.

If you like doing research from home while wearing your pajamas, you might just want to take the Conducting Research from Home workshop. You can access all sorts of important research works, full text databases, and scholarly internet sites all from the comfort of your own home.

If you are doing research and would like some help with your bibliographic references or citations, you might like to take our Introduction to EndNote workshop. EndNote helps you manage your references and helps you create your bibliography as you write your paper. This workshop will take you through the basic features of the software, how to import citations from databases, as well as how to use EndNote with the Microsoft Word software.

Tuesday April 28th
10.00 am – Conducting Research from Home

Wednesday April 29th
2.00 pm – Introduction to EndNote

To check out the workshops offered at Dewey, see the online listing. All classes are held in the classroom in Dewey Library’s basement. You can register for these classes one of the following ways:

•Online at http://library.albany.edu/dewey/forms/class_registration_spring06.html
•At the Reference Desk
•By calling the Reference Desk at 422-3691
•By sending email to Dewclass@albany.edu

If you find that you are unable to attend a class that you have registered for, please call the Reference Desk or send email to let us know.

April 22, 2009

More Ways to Get the Books You Need

Finding a book in the library can be as simple as going to the shelf and retrieving the book. Sometimes, the book you need is not on the shelf. If this happens, fill out any of our request forms to get the item you need.

Here are the main request forms available to students:

Recall Services : This form should be filled out when the item you need is checked out to another patron and you urgently need the item for your research. You can recall an item through your Minerva account, meaning the patron who has the book checked out will have to return it 14 days of your recall. Users are limited to ten active recall requests. Please be aware that any item you have checked out may be recalled by another student as well. This form is also available directly from Minerva, when you are on the "location" screen of the item record, there is a "recall this book" link -- all you have to do is login with your NetId and password, and the book is automatically recalled.

On Order/In Processing Request Form /strong>: If you look up a book in Minerva and the status says either states “On Order," "In Processing," "In Cataloging Backlog," or "Under Consideration," fill out the form to request that the processing be rushed and the book placed on hold for you. In other words, we will speed up making this book avaialable and you will be contacted when it is ready.

<a href="http://library.albany.edu/circ/notonshelf">Not On Shelf Form : If Minerva indicates your item should be on the shelf but it is not, fill out the Not On Shelf form. We encourage you to exhaust all other options before filling this form out –make sure you’re at the library in which the book resides and that you’re in the right collection (you won’t find a reference book in the circulating collection!) Also, ask at the circulation desk to see if the book was recently checked back in. In the meantime, feel free to submit an ILL request to obtain the book from another library if the item can’t be located right away.

If there is a particular item that the University Libraries do not own but you feel should be in the collection, then fill out the Recommendation for Library Purchase Form. We take all recommendations into consideration, so don’t hesitate!

For more information on these services, ask a librarian!.

Blog post created by Jill Parsons

April 21, 2009

What exactly are Criminal Justice Faculty Researching?

Criminal Justice students interested in the research your faculty are doing, should check out the Hindelang Criminal Justice Research Center . Here you can find out about all of the current research center projects, independent research projects, and completed research center projects as well as a link to display the School of Criminal Justice alumni dissertations.

Some of the current projects are accomplishing notable work. For example, the Capital Punishment Research Initiative (National Death Penalty Archive) with James Acker and Charles Lanier as Project Co-Directors, and the Rochester Youth Development Study with Terence Thornberry as Project Director and Marvin Krohn, Alan Lizotte, and Shawn Bushway as Project Co-Directors are two high profile projects with national recognition.

To learn more about publications of a Hindelang Criminal Justice Research Center project— for example, the Rochester Youth Development Study:

Select the appropriate link on the Hidelang Criminal Justice Research Center page. In this case, http://www.albany.edu/hindelang/youth_study.html. The page appears containing the names of the Project Director and Project Co-Directors, a brief summary describing the work that they do, the projects and sponsoring agencies, a link to their publications, a list of the staff and office locations as well as appropriate contact information.

To read about the work this project has accomplished so far, select the “Publications��? link in the middle of the page. The Rochester Youth Development Study (RYDS) Publication page appears. This page contains a list of the books, articles and chapters written by members of the RYDS project displayed by year of publication.

To see if we have a copy in our library of the following article, for example:
Ireland, T. O., Smith, C. A., and Thornberry, T. P. (2002). Developmental issues in the impact of child maltreatment on later delinquency and drug use. Criminology, 40(2), 359-399.

First we need to see if we have the journal Criminology in our library. From the library’s main web page , in the left hand column select “Minerva – Library Catalog��?. On the “Basic Search page��? select the “Journals��? tab in the middle of the page. Enter Criminology in the field in the middle of the screen. “Search Type:��? field will default to “Title begins with… (drop initial article)��?. On the results page, select the second link to display our record for this journal. To see if we have the year, volume, and issue of this journal that we need, select the “Availability��? link. You will see that we have Volume 40, Issue 2 for this journal in both print and online.

To find books you will want to search “Full Catalog��? in Minerva. Note that if you are searching by title you will have to select “Title begins with….��?

A search of “Databases & Indexes��? can be used to bring up newer articles or other articles on the topic. Note that there is a specific list of recommended databases for criminal justice when you go to http://library.albany.edu/ and mouseover on “Databases & Indexes.��? Generally you will want to start with the database Criminal Justice Abstracts, when looking for articles, or NCJRS Abstracts Database when looking for reports. When looking for very recent articles EBSCO Academic Premier Database is often an excellent supplement to the major criminal justice databases. Our search retrieved one very recent article on RYDS: Krohn, M.D., Hall, G.P. and Lizotte (2009), A.J. Family transitions and later delinquency and drug use. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 38(3), 466-480.

For detailed information on how to select and use databases to find articles, books, and reports consult our Criminal Justice Research Tutorial . And feel free to contact Criminal Justice Bibliographer Mary Jane Brustman by email mbrustman@uamail.albany.edu or by phone 442-3540.


Blog post created by Judith Mueller

April 19, 2009

Last Chance to Take Social Welfare Research Seminar

This week, we will be offering the final Social Welfare Research Seminar of the Semester on Wednesday, April 22, at 2:00pm. Social Welfare students who have not yet taken this required seminar should sign up at their earliest convenience.

Sign up for this workshop in person at the Reference Desk, by callilng 442-3691, using our online registration form, or by emailing dewclass@albany.edu.

April 17, 2009

Photo of the Week

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A bird's eye view of the Info Commons on the main floor.

Additional workstations are available in the basement, including group study spaces with terminals.

Photo credit: Morris Stilson

April 15, 2009

What’s New in the Information Commons.

Welcome back from Spring Break! Take a look at what new is being offered in the Information Commons:

Wireless Printing: That’s right, if you bring your laptop to the library (PC or Apple), you will be able to print right from them. You will need to download a client for each library printer you want to use. Then, when you go to print, you will be prompted to enter your netid and your document name (if your document has no name, it will be called “document 1��?). Just as the desktop computers in the library, your document will stay in the printer queue for two hours and cost $.10 per page to print.

Virtual IC : The Information Commons page is now available virtually! There will be 15 “seats��? (or simultaneous) users available at a time and you will see a secondary start button to click on which will open up the IC programs. Some things to keep in mind when using Virtual IC:


  • You must be on broadband to use Virtual IC, not dial-up.

  • You will not be able to access your drives while in Virtual IC. If you had previous work in another program, such as Word and it is saved on a flash or you C: drive for example, you won’t be able to open it in Virtual IC. If you want to access and save documents, use your S: drive. Any documents saved in mydocuments on the Virtual IC page will be lost once you log off.

Documents may be printed to local printers and they will be converted into pdf. Documents can also be emailed.
In the event you get dropped off the wireless, your information is retained for 15 minutes. Your “seat��? in the Virtual IC is also retained for 15 minutes. After this time, your seat will be open for another patron and your work will be lost.

If you have questions about these services, make sure you ask our knowledgeable technology consultants located in the Information Commons. At Dewey, the consultants are available Mon-Thurs 2pm-8pm, Fri 2pm-5pm, and Sun 2pm-6pm

Blog post created by Jill Parsons

April 14, 2009

Ageline's New Features

Students studying Social Welfare and Gerontology might be interested in the Ageline database. Ageline is an online research database produced by AARP (American Association of Retired People) that contains abstracts of books, reports, and articles on aging and on people middle-age and older. The abstracts are from both AARP and other publishers. Whenever possible, links are provided for the full text or for purchase information.

The Ageline database user interface has been recently improved. Some of the new features help you to search and retrieve information easier. These new features include:


  • Performing a basic search from the Ageline home page.

  • Sorting your results by most recent date, author, document type, source, title, or by relevance.

  • Displaying your search expression at the top of each of the results pages. You will find this at the top of each page labeled: “Your search: “.

  • Selecting the journal title link and displaying all entries in the database from that particular journal.

  • Selecting one of the subject terms in your result entry and displaying all entries in the database that have the same subject term.

  • Viewing the Advanced Search screen on one screen.

  • Displaying or hiding search options on the screen. These options include displaying more search fields, and displaying search options such as Publication Year, Target Audience, and Document Type.

  • Specifying the relationship between words when your search phrase contains more than one word. Meaning, you can specify whether the two or more words are next to each other, within five words of each other, in any position in the text, or whether the results must contain these words exactly as entered.

  • Limiting your results to be from the latest Ageline update.
  • All of the previous functions are still available. These allow you to limit your search results to only include entries that provide full-text online for free, perform searches for a particular author, particular title, or a particular subject, browse author, title, and subject indexes, use Boolean operators to create complex searches, and to print or download records.

    If you have any questions on how to use the Ageline database, or any other Social Welfare research assistance, please contact Elaine Bergman, the Social Welfare bibliographer at ebergman@uamail.albany.edu, or by phone 442-3695.

    Blog post created by Judith Mueller

April 12, 2009

Dewey Workshops April 13-17

This week’s workshops offered at Dewey Library include the Social Welfare Research Seminar, and Introduction to Research Databases.

Social Welfare students, if you graduate this May and haven’t yet taken the Social Welfare Research Seminar yet, there is a chance to take it this week, on Monday at 11:00 am.

We are also offering Introduction to Research Databases this Tuesday at 3:00 pm, and again on Wednesday at 3:30pm. This workshop will teach you how to use the databases more efficiently when doing your research.

Monday April 13th
11:00 am – Social Welfare Research Seminar

Tuesday April 14th
3:00 pm- Introduction to Research Databases

Wednesday April 15th
3:30 pm- Introduction to Research Databases

To check out the workshops offered at Dewey, see the online listing. All classes are held in the classroom in Dewey Library’s basement. You can register for these classes one of the following ways:

•Online at http://library.albany.edu/dewey/forms/class_registration_spring06.html
•At the Reference Desk
•By calling the Reference Desk at 422-3691
•By sending email to Dewclass@albany.edu

If you find that you are unable to attend a class that you have registered for, please call the Reference Desk or send email to let us know.

April 10, 2009

Photo of the Week

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A behind-the-scenes view of Morris Stilson scanning an article for Document Delivery.

Photo credit: Lindsay VanBerkom

April 8, 2009

Save Yourself a Trip with Document Delivery

The University Libraries have a lot of journals available online for you to access from your home. However, some journals are only available in print. If you find an article citation in a database and the libraries only have that journal in print, then submit a UA Delivery request.

UA Delivery (or Document Delivery) is a library service to have print articles scanned and sent to you electronically in PDF. This way, you can save a trip to the library and print out the article from home at your convenience. All you need to do is log in to Illiad to complete your request. You will need to have the full article citation and the call number of the journal, which can be found by searching Minerva. Make sure that the library definitely owns the journal so we can get the articles to you as soon as we can!

UA Delivery also offers books from one library to be sent to your pickup library. For example, if your pickup library is Dewey and you need a book located at the Science Library, you can submit a UA Delivery request to have the book sent down to Dewey for you to pickup. This way, you can save time traveling back and forth between libraries. This request is also completed through Illiad.

Keep in mind that we will process a total of three UA Delivery requests per day.

Please ask a reference librarian if you have any questions about UA Delivery or need assistance completing a request, we're here to help!

April 7, 2009

Resources on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (Economic Stimulus Act)

On February 16th, 2009 President Obama’s signed into law “the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act��?. This act was created to help our faltering economy and to help move the United States forward in the 21st century.

This act was approved in the House of Representatives and the Senate on February 13, 2009. On February 16th, President Obama signed the act, and on February 17th, the Office of Management and Budget Director, Peter Orszag, sent a memo to the heads of all of the departments and agencies receiving money from this act. Many of these agencies also have their own web sites. (http://www.recovery.gov/?q=content/agencies)

A few of the various departments and agencies receiving funds are:

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act created a board of inspector generals to watch over the Federal agencies. This board is called the Recovery Accountability and Transparency Board. This board is made up of a Chairman (The Honorable Earl E. Devaney) and 10 inspector generals. These inspector generals come from the Department of Agriculture, the Department of Commerce, the Department of Energy, the Department of Health and Human Services, the Department of Homeland Security, the Department of Justice, the Department of Transportation, the Department of Treasury, the Department of Education, along with an inspector general for Tax Administration.

The website www.recovery.gov is the primary way that the board keeps the American people informed. The entire American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 can be accessed on the White House web site. This act is 407 pages long. To get a condensed version of answers to some common questions, read the Frequently Asked Questions found on the website.

New York’s Guide to the 2008 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, provides information on how the funds are being allocated in New York State.

If you have any further questions about researching this topic, please do not hesitate to contact Public Policy and Political Science Bibliographer Dick Irving. His phone number is 442-3698 and his e-mail is rirving@uamail.albany.edu.

Blog post created by Judith Mueller

April 5, 2009

Free Workshops Offered at Dewey Library the Week of April 6-10

This week’s workshops include Conducting Research from Home and Introduction to Information Resources for Gerontology.

If you like doing research from home in the middle of the night, you might just want to take the Conducting Research from Home workshop. You can access all sorts of important research works, full text databases, and scholarly internet sites all from the comfort of your own home.

Anyone interested in learning more about gerontological social work might like to take the Introduction to Information Resources for Gerontology workshop. Here you will learn about the key resources and databases related to gerontological social work. You will also learn about search strategies and tips for finding useful articles, web sites, and books about the elderly.

Tuesday April 7th
10:00 am – Conducting Research from Home

Friday April 10th
10:00 am - Introduction to Information Resources for Gerontology

To check out the workshops offered at Dewey, see the online listing. All classes are held in the mezzanine classroom in Dewey Library’s basement. You can register for these classes one of the following ways:

• Online at http://library.albany.edu/dewey/forms/class_registration_spring06.html
• At the Reference Desk
• By calling the Reference Desk at 422-3691
• By sending email to Dewclass@albany.edu

If you find that you are unable to attend a class that you have registered for, please call the Reference Desk or send email to let us know.

April 3, 2009

Photo of the Week

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A sample of some of our books and handouts to help with citing sources.

Check our online style guides as well: http://library.albany.edu/usered/cite/index.html

Photo credit: Morris Stilson

April 1, 2009

Cite with Style!

Using correct and precise citations in your papers is extremely important. Dewey has a number or electronic and print resources to help you cite you references correctly without being accused of plagiarism.

If you’re writing a paper from home and don’t have access to a style guide book, check our online citation style guides. There you will guides that will help you cite using APA, ASA (American Sociological Association), MLA and Chicago styles. There is also an informational link that will help you understand when to cite information in your paper. These “cheat sheets��? were designed to show you how to cite just right.

If you prefer using a style guide in print, Dewey has many of those available as well:

APA:
Concise Rules of APA Style: REF BF 76.7 C66 2005
APA Style Guide to Electronic References: REF BF76.6 P84X 2007

ASA:
ASA Style Guide: Ref HM 73 A437X 1997

MLA:
MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing: REF PN 147 G444 2008

Chicago:
The Chicago Manual of Style: REF Z 253 U69 2003
See also: A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations : Chicago Style for Students and Researchers: REF LB 2369 T8 2009

Lastly, you may have heard of the popular citation-generator program called EndNote. This program helps you assemble a bibliography and references as you write your paper. Dewey offers classes in EndNote too. The last one for this semester is April 29th at 2:00pm. If you’re interested, make sure you sign up for this free workshop by contacting the reference desk (phone: 442-3691; email: Dewclass@albany.edu, or online.

As always, if you have a question about styling your citations correctly, ask a librarian.

Blog post created by Jill Parsons