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October 30, 2011

Dewey Workshops 10/31-11/4

If you haven’t attended any Dewey workshops but find yourself struggling with research then checking out our Introduction to Research Databases session will really help. Learn the best ways to search our databases and save yourself some time as the semester workload piles up.

Wednesday 11/2
3:00 pm: Introduction to Research Databases

If you’d like to sign up for this instruction session at Dewey you can do so online, in person at the reference desk, or by calling us at 442 3691.

October 28, 2011

Photo of the Week

small classroom smiling.jpg

Some Social Welfare students recently attended the Research Seminar in the refurbished electronic classroom. Dewey offers a wide variety of free workshops to help acquaint you with the library, its resources, and services. Pick up a schedule at the Dewey Reference Desk and register in person, or you can register online or by calling 442-3691.

Photo credit: Morris Stilson

October 25, 2011

Resources for Evidence Based Social Work Practice

Evidence-based practice is a prominent philosophy and process in today’s social work profession. The Dewey Library has several resources on evidence-based practice for social work that will be useful to social welfare students. These resources explain the concepts and theories related to evidence-based practice and the field of social work.

The second volume of the Encyclopedia of Social Work (Dewey Library Reference HV 45 E53 2009) has an extensive overview of evidence-based practice for social work. For evaluations examining the effectiveness of certain practices, check out the Campbell Collaboration and the Cochrane Collaboration . The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA is another resource for evidence-based practice. SAMHSA lists effective programs and treatment regimens in the National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices. The Encyclopedia of Social Work also highlights the findings in Developing Practice Guidelines for Social Work Intervention: Issues, Methods, and Research Agenda by Rosen and Proctor (Dewey Library Reserves HV 40.35 D48 2003). In this book, Rosen and Proctor develop guidelines that bring together knowledge in the social work field and empirically based practice.

The third volume of the Comprehensive Handbook of Social Work and Social Welfare (Dewey Library Reference HV 40 C635 2008) is another resource that has useful references on evidence-based practice. What Works in Child Welfare by Kluger, Alexander, and Curtis (Dewey Library HV 741 W383 2000) highlights evidence-based practice regarding child welfare. In the Journal of Social Work Education (Dewey Library Periodical HV 11 J66 V.39:2003 or online) the a rticle “Evidence-Based Practice: Sea Change of the Emperor's New Clothes��? by Gambrill focuses on how evidence-based practice is an alternative to authority-based practice. These sources and many more are explained in the Comprehensive Handbook of Social Work and Social Welfare, making it a great starting point for research on evidence-based practice.

In addition to the resources mentioned, there are several more books on evidence-based practice for social work. Check out the following titles at the Dewey Library:

Social work research and evaluation: foundations of evidence-based practice. Richard M. Grinnell, Jr. and Yvonne A. Unrau. New York: Oxford University Press, 2011.
Dewey Library HV 11 S589 2011

Evidence-based practice in educating deaf and hard-of-hearing students. Patricia Elizabeth Spencer. New York: Oxford University Press, 2010.
Dewey Library HV 2430 S68 2010

Evidence-based practice in the field of substance abuse: a book of readings. Katherine van Wormer. Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Sage, c2010.
Dewey Library HV 4998 E95 2010

A beginner’s guide to evidence based practice in health and social care professions. Helen Aveyard. New York, NY: Open University Press, 2009.
Dewey Library R 723.7 A94X 2009

Evidence-based practice of cognitive-behavioral therapy. Deborah Dobson. New York: Guilford Press, c2009.
Dewey Library RC 489 C63 D63 2009

To find up-to-date journal articles on evidence-based practice, check out our databases . Click on "Social Welfare," and then select the subtopic "Evidence Based Practice" on the right. Evidence based practice as a subject heading in PsycInfo yields several results and Medline via PubMed is also has severa generall articles on evidence-based practice. Other relevant databases include CINAHL and Health Reference Center.

If you have any questions about evidence-based practice for social work, please contact our social welfare bibliographer Elaine Lasda Bergman by email [elasdabergman@albany.edu] or phone 442-3695.

October 24, 2011

Open Access Week 2011 Events

The University at Albany University Libraries and the Eastern New York Chapter of the Association of College and Research Libraries are celebrating Open Access Week 2011 with exhibits and a program of activities on the afternoon of Wednesday October 26.

For a brief introduction to open access you may wish to watch a video created at UAlbany Libraries.

What does open access have to do with copyright? When scholars write an article for publication they are often asked by the publisher to transfer all copyrights so that the publisher has exclusive rights for copying and distribution of the article. The publisher then collects all royalties from journal sales, and holds all rights for any subsequent use, with the exception of fair use rights. In the system of scholarly communication that we now have, that often times results in the publishers charging subscription fees for publications that make them unaffordable and that create barriers to access for those who wish to read the scholarly articles. Open access publishing allows scholarly articles and other scholarly work to be available for no cost over the internet.

Open Access Week 2011 is the fifth annual global celebration of open access, which allows for free access to information and to the enhance ability for students and scholars to get the information they need for their work.

Wednesday October 26 - three programs to celebrate Open Access at the University at Albany.

12:00 – 1:30pm Brown bag lunch and discussion of open access
Science Library
Standish Room, 3rd Floor

Bring a lunch and the libraries will provide drinks. Discussion moderator will be Irina Holden, Information Literacy and Science Outreach Librarian. Co – Sponsored by Eastern New York Chapter Association of College and Research Libraries (ENY/ACRL)

R.S.V.P Lorre Smith lsmith@albany.edu by October 21, 2011 for the luncheon

*********

2:00 – 3:30pm “Open Science, Free Software, and Citizen Astronomers��?
Dr. David Hogg
Science Library
Standish Room, 3rd Floor

Being open in scientific research--sharing code and ideas before publication, for example--can yield huge direct benefits for scientific investigators. This is most true when ideas are cheap but execution is expensive; these conditions are met in most (but not all) scientific fields. One of the big side effects of extreme openness is that it makes it easy for outsiders (non-traditionally trained or self-trained) scientists to contribute meaningfully to research. Dr. Hogg will give examples from work by his group. A reception will follow the talk in the Standish Room.

********
4:00 - 4:45:
Tour of College of Nanoscale Sciences and Engineering

The College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) of the University at Albany - State University of New York (SUNY) is a global education, research, development and technology deployment resource dedicated to preparing the next generation of scientists and researchers in nanotechnology.
R.S.V.P. Lorre Smith lsmith@albany.edu to reserve a spot on the tour by October 21, 2011.

Thanks to University Auxiliary Services for its generous support of these programs.

For more information regarding open access be sure and check these resources

* Open Access Week
*Peter Suber's Online Access Information Page

For more information on our activities here at UAlbany, please check our online schedule of events.

October 23, 2011

Dewey Instruction Sessions 10/24-10/27

This week we’re again offering the workshops: University Libraries’ Website, Nonprofit Organizations-Information Sources, and ICPSR, Data and Statistical Resources. We’re also offering Introduction to Information Resources for Gerontology. This workshop is useful for those going in to the aging profession. An overview of key resources related to gerontological social work and relevant reference works and databases will be covered.
The following sessions are scheduled this week:

Wednesday 10/26
1:00 pm: Introduction to Information Resources for Gerontology
2:30 pm: University Libraries’ Website

Thursday 10/27
4:30 pm: Nonprofit Organizations-Information Sources
5:30 pm: ICPSR, Data and Statistical Resources

If you’d like to sign up for an instruction session at Dewey you can do so online, in person at the reference desk, or by calling us at 442 3691.

October 21, 2011

Cookie Reception!!!

The Dewey Library held a cookie reception on October 13 to celebrate the improvements made to its Group Study Peristyle and Electronic Classroom. Both rooms got new furniture, the Group Study area got a fresh coat of paint, and the classroom received an LCD monitor to replace the old projector. Here are a couple of photos of the event:

small cookie reception 2.jpg

small cookie reception.jpg

Photo credit: Morris Stilson

October 19, 2011

QR Codes and Readers

Have you ever seen an advertisement or announcement that also had a weird looking barcode attached to it? It probably looked something like this:

QR CODE.png

These symbols are called a “QR��? code which stands for “Quick Response��? code. These codes have become very popular, showing up on everything from clothing advertisements to political action ads. So why are they so popular, and what do they do? Good Question. These codes are used to act like a barcode; they contain information such as web addresses or pertinent information about a person or event. For example, the code above contains the URL for the University at Albany’s library webpage. In order to “read��? the code one would need a Smartphone and an application that is designed to process these types of codes.

In general these applications will utilize the phone’s camera to view and “read��? the QR code. The application will identify the purpose of the code, whether it is informational, or contains a URL. The application will then ask the user if they would like to take action, such as following the URL or saving the information contained within the code. So, with that we get to the point of this post, to highlight a few QR code reader apps for your Smartphone and tablets. These applications are by no means the only options, but should get you started into the world of QR codes.

Let’s begin with the Android operating system, and the QR code reader that is considered one of the best for this OS. This application is simply titled “Barcode Scanner��? and it can read both QR codes as well as basic UPC codes you would find on many retail products. Like many others it allows you to scan QR codes and take action depending on the information contained within the code. This application also allows you to scan UPC codes and compare the price against other retailers and even online stores such as Amazon or Ebay!

For all you Apple users out there, the “Red Laser��? application is available for your iPhone, and it offers a ton of great features for code reading. This application also scans both QR and UPC barcodes, allowing you to take action on the QR or comparison shop with the UPC code. Also, because this is a library blog, “Red Laser allows you to scan a book barcode and it will find the book in a nearby library through the WorldCat system. This application will also allow you to create your own QR codes for posting to the web or printing and posting anywhere..

If you have an iPad, never fear, there are applications to read QR codes for you too! One of the best options is “Scan��? by QR Code City. This application is more focused on QR codes, and makes no mention of the ability to scan UPC codes. It will allow you to acquire the information held in the code and take the appropriate action. This is a simple, stripped down application that will work for all of your QR code reading needs.

Finally for Blackberry users, there are numerous QR code scanning application available to you. One of the best is ScanLife Barcode Reader which is capable of scanning QR, UPC, Datamatrix, and EZcode barcodes. Like many of the others will allow you to create your own codes as well as comparison shop on the internet using UPC codes. This is a powerful application and should fulfill all of your QR code reading desires!

For more information on QR codes as well as other recommendations for QR applications, here is an App Review that should put you on the right track. Have fun, and explore the world of QR codes, they can be powerful marketing tools for all types of organizations, events, and groups.

Blog post created by Benjamin Knowles

October 18, 2011

Open Acccess: A Student's Perspective

Scholarly communication, the process of producing and disseminating new knowledge, is essential to the growth and development of all disciplines. Scholars’ ability to discover, create and innovate is dependent on their access to the current body of knowledge in their field. Students’ success, for graduates and undergraduates alike, is similarly dependent on their access to information. The meteoric rise of journal subscription costs over the past two decades has severely limited access to scholarly works as libraries are forced to cancel large numbers of journal subscriptions. In some cases, these cuts have been so dire as to impede scholar’s ability to secure funding and conduct research. At the heart of this crisis is an inequitable publishing model that benefits publishers at the expense of scholarship.

Current Publishing Model

Many of the for-profit publishing companies that produce the top journals in their fields, particularly those that specialize in the science, technology and medicine (STM) fields, realized profits of over 30% in 2007, profit margins that rival companies like Microsoft and Google. At the same time, profits for book publishers were in the single digits. At the heart of this profitability is a unique and inequitable business model. For-profit publishers get their content for free from scholars who are dependent on being published in top-tier journals for career advancement and to contribute to their field. Funding for the research these articles are based on comes primarily from academic and government programs. Once published the works are sold to academic and medical libraries at exorbitant rates. Many journals cost $5,000 or $10,000 a year, with a few charging an astronomical $25,000. An article can only be published in one journal, eliminating competition that would otherwise make these prices untenable. It is no wonder that a recent Guardian article claims that academic publishers “make Walmart look like a corner shop and Rupert Murdoch like a socialist.��?.

Authors’ Rights

In the traditional publishing model an author signs over all rights to the publishing company, including her right to disseminate her own work. Therefore, she could not give it to friends and colleagues, post it on her personal website or use it as course materials. While copyright is often thought of as a single entity, it is, in fact, a bundle of rights which can be separated and managed individually as best suits the needs of the author. For example, the rise in popularity of academic repositories has prompted many academic institutions to prevent their scholars from signing contracts that prohibit their work from being included in a depository. As a result, about two thirds of the publishing companies include such a clause in their contracts, however many companies do not have such a clause, forcing many authors to give up all rights in order to see their work published. In response, organizations like Creative Commons and SPARC have developed tools to help authors manage their rights and negotiate with publishing companies.

Open Access
Open Access (OA) is a reorganization of the academic journal publishing industry to ensure wider access to scholarly communications. It calls for journal content to be made available online, free of charge and with limited copyright and licensing restrictions. This would ensure that the latest research can be used by the greatest number of people. In the medical field, for example, doctors and nurses from hospitals and practices of all sizes would have access to the latest information when making decisions about patient care. This would have the most impact in smaller communities and developing countries where library budgets are smallest. OA would also give authors more flexibility in managing the rights to their works.

Many question OA’s economic viability. The OA community has developed several funding models/. For example, the use-triggered fee model proposes a voluntary fee for institutions whose use of journal reaches a predetermined threshold. Free access by individual users, institutions that are occasional users and users in developing countries would be subsidized by larger institutions. By definition, OA journals must be free, so the fee cannot be mandatory. Publishers would, therefore, have to implement various incentive programs to encourage institutions to pay, including extra services. In addition, the fact that institutions could opt out of payment would prevent publishing companies from charging the astronomical rates common in today’s subscription based market. Another funding option would be the inclusion of advertising with online journal content following the model of sites like Google. While this may seem like blasphemy to some, it is not unprecedented; print journals have long included advertising. These are just two of the funding models being discusses in relation to OA. In the end, a combination of models will probably be necessary to create sustainable funding.

Digital Repositories

Digital repositories offer another OA model which bypasses publishing companies all together. Repositories are online collections of peer-reviewed works, data sets, images, preprints, research reports, dissertations and thesis that are freely available to users. They allow authors to quickly disseminate their works to a wide audience. Institutional repositories, usually maintained by the library, preserve the intellectual output of the institution in digital form. The growth in popularity of repositories has spawned several software packages that help institutions set up their own repository []. DSpace, for example, is open-source software developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to create a seamless world-wide network of repositories. The SUNY Digital Repository, which uses DSpace, collects and makes available works from across the SUNY system. Disciplinary repositories collect items related to a particular field. DLIST, for example, is an open access, cross-institutional archive for Information Science and Technology hosted by The University of Arizona Campus Repository. More examples of digital repositories can be found through The Open Access Directory, and http://www.opendoar.org/OpenDOAR.

Libraries and Open Access
As the primary purchasers of and point of access for scholarly communications, libraries have a large stake in the OA movement. As the traditional publishing model is revised, librarians have an opportunity to put themselves and their institutions at the center of the production and dissemination of scholarly works. Libraries have played a central role in the growth of digital repositories and will continue to be active as more colleges and universities collect and preserve student and faculty works. In addition, some libraries have taken on the roles of publisher and distributor, either on their own or in partnership with university presses and other not-for-profit publishers. For example the Cornell University Library has teamed up with Duke University Press to produce Project Euclid, an online collection of hi-impact, peer reviewed journals in applied mathematics and statistics offered available at reasonable subscription rates. The University of Michigan Library’s Scholarly Publishing Office publishes books, journals and other scholarly materials in a variety of fields, including philosophy, social work and women’s studies.

For more information on scholarly communications and open access, check out:

The Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL)

The ACRL Scholarly Communication Toolkit
The Scholarly Publishing & Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC)
Open Access Week

Blog post created by Cary Gouldin

October 16, 2011

Dewey Instruction Sessions 10/17-10/21

If you still haven’t attended the Social Welfare Research Seminar, this week is a great week to do so. We are also offering our Nonprofit Organizations-Information Sources workshop.

The following sessions are scheduled this week:
Wednesday 10/19
1:00 pm: Social Welfare Research Seminar
4:30 pm: Nonprofit Organizations-Information Sources

If you’d like to sign up for an instruction session at Dewey you can do so online , in person at the reference desk, or by calling us at 442 3691.

October 13, 2011

Photo of the Week

small Fall 11 downtown campus 008.jpg

Fall is definitely here, as you can see by this bright bush outside the library. Does anyone know what type of bush it is?

Photo Credit: Morris Stilson

October 12, 2011

Open Access Week 2011 Events

The University at Albany University Libraries and Eastern New York Chapter Association of College and Research Libraries are celebrating Open Access Week 2011 with exhibits and a program of activities on the afternoon of Wednesday October 26.

Wednesday October 26
12:00 – 1:30pm Brown bag lunch and discussion of open access Science Library, Standish Room, 3rd Floor - Bring a lunch and the libraries will provide drinks. Discussion moderator will be Irina Holden, Information Literacy and Science Outreach Librarian. R.S.V.P Lorre Smith lsmith@albany.edu by October 21, 2011

2:00 – 3:30pm “Open Science, Free software, and Citizen Astronomers��? Dr. David Hogg Science Library, Standish Room, 3rd Floor - Being open in scientific research--sharing code and ideas before publication, for example--can yield huge direct benefits for scientific investigators. This is most true when ideas are cheap but execution is expensive; these conditions are met in most (but not all) scientific fields. One of the big side effects of extreme openness is that it makes it easy for outsiders (non-traditionally trained or self-trained) scientists to contribute meaningfully to research. Dr. Hogg will give examples from work by his group. A reception will follow the talk in the Standish Room.

4:00 - 4:45: Tour of College of Nanoscale Sciences and Engineering - The College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (CNSE) of the University at Albany - State University of New York (SUNY) is a global education, research, development and technology deployment resource dedicated to preparing the next generation of scientists and researchers in nanotechnology. R.S.V.P. to Lorre Smith lsmith@albany.edu to reserve a spot on the tour by October 21, 2011.

For more information please check out the Libraries' news item on the event.

Thanks to University Auxilliary Services for its generous support of these programs.

October 11, 2011

Criminal Justice Issues and the Obama Administration

There are a lot of great resources on the Obama administration and its policy positions regarding criminal justice issues. Much of this criminal justice policy information is readily available online on websites and in journals and newspapers. A number of databases are useful for criminal justice policy research. Together these resources will help you gain a better understanding of how this presidential administration has shaped today’s criminal justice system.

The Department of Justice has a comprehensive website with the latest criminal justice information. The DOJ Criminal Division specifically focuses on federal criminal law in the United States. The division implements several programs to educate the public on issues such as human rights, fraud, and child exploitation. The priorities of the Department of Justice can be seen in their strategic plans and budget documents. One priority of the Obama administration is to fight terrorism. There is information on the web with Department of Justice initiatives on terrorism, and Homeland Security Department initiatives.

Attorney General Eric Holder is both a cabinet member and the highest law enforcement officer of the federal government. His actions and decisions influence the criminal justice system and reflect the Obama administration’s positions on policies. Selected publications of the Attorney General can be accessed online. Also available online are President Obama’s speeches. All of his speeches are displayed--the most recent listed first. This is a great way to stay up-to-date on his administration’s most pressing issues.

The University Libraries have a guide which provides a list of United States Government agencies involved in the criminal justice process. Also, the Justice Policy Institute is a non-profit organization that focuses on justice policies and reform. The website has policy news and updates on its front page—for federal, state and local policy.

The University Libraries have extensive resources on the Obama administration and the criminal justice system. Our databases, Criminal Justice Abstracts with Full Text, Criminal Justice Periodicals Index, PAIS (on public policy generally), and Academic Search Complete, provide access to scholarly articles related to the criminal justice system and the Obama administration. Our online access for the New York Times provides articles and analyses on this subject. (The New York Times is available online at their website , but for fuller coverage see LexisNexis database.)

When searching databases the subject headings criminal justice and criminal justice administration both generate relevant results. Consider narrower terms like drug policy or sentencing and combine them with Obama for more targeted searches. Dick Irving, the Public Affairs subject specialist at Dewey Library, created a nice Guide to Federal Public Policy Research. Here he lists publications like CQ Researcher and National Journal that specialize in policy articles.

Questions? Come to the Dewey Library reference desk or contact our criminal justice librarian, Mary Jane Brustman, by email: mbrustman@albany.edu or call 442-3540.

Blog post created by Katherine Farrell

October 9, 2011

Dewey Workshops 10/10-10/14


For the first time this week we are offering the workshop Nonprofit Organizations-Information Sources. Here, you will learn about print, online, and internet sources related to nonprofit organizations. Most of this workshop will allow you to learn while you personally search for relevant sources. Also offered this week: EDiscover, Evidence Based Practice, and ICPSR, Data and Statistical Resources.
The following sessions are scheduled this week:

Tuesday 10/11
2:30 pm: eDiscover

Wednesday 10/12
3:00 pm: Evidence Based Practice
4:30 pm: Nonprofit Organizations-Information Sources

Friday 10/14
11:00 am: ICPSR, Data and Statistical Resources

If you’d like to sign up for an instruction session at Dewey you can do so online, in person at the reference desk, or by calling us at 442 3691.

October 5, 2011

Resources for Writing your Thesis or Dissertation

Towards the end of either a Master’s or Doctoral degree you may have the choice, or be asked to complete a Thesis. Theses are also called Dissertations depending on the institution or even the country you are completing your research in. Theses often determine whether or not a degree will be conferred on the person completing the work, and in general the thesis will include all of the research and findings compiled by the author on the subject they choose or are given. It is the ultimate culmination of the degree program and often encompasses years of research.

Here at SUNY Albany, there are numerous resources that that are related to Theses and Dissertations. Most are focused on helping those who are in the process of completing their dissertation. While others have more broad aims and could be used in a variety of situations.

The University libraries have access to databases that will be helpful to those writing their dissertation as well as others. These can be found by going to the library website and clicking on the “Databases��? tab. At the bottom of the page there is an option for “Other Formats��? with a link that reads “Dissertations and Theses��?, by clicking this you will see all of the databases on this topic. Here are a few of the resources that are available through the University libraries:

•Dissertations and Theses
•Dissertations @ SUNY Albany
•Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations
•Theses Canada Portal

These databases can be used to research topics not related to a Thesis as well; theses and dissertations of course contain large numbers of archived research useful for everyday research.

There are also a variety of books available specifically related to Theses and Dissertations. They cover topics ranging from picking a topic, writing, citations, etc. These resources will be invaluable to anyone at any stage of their theses research.

Theses and Dissertations: A guide to planning, Research, and Writing by R. Murray Thomas and Dale L. Brubaker (University Library LB 2369 T458X 2008)

The Dissertation Desk Reference: The Doctoral Student's Manual to Writing the Dissertation by Raymond L. Calabrese (Dewey Library Reference LB 2369 C273 2009)

Complete Your Dissertation or Thesis in Two Semesters or Less by Evelyn Hunt Ogden (University Library LB 2369 O33 2007)

The Portable Dissertation Advisor by Miles T. Bryant (University Library LB 1742 B79 2004)

Finally if you have any other questions or need more help finding resources on Dissertations, Dissertation writing, editing, whatever, make sure to visit the education Research Tutorial on “Writing Dissertations��?. You will find all kinds of resources, websites and helpful tips that will have you well on your way to completing your dissertation.

Of course if you need help with research or finding guides for writing theses or dissertations, style guides, or other works to assist with preparingand formatting your document, please ask at the Dewey Reference Desk, call us at 442-3691 or email dewref@albany.edu. Bonne chance!

October 4, 2011

Remembering and Researching Gov. Hugh Carey and other NYS Executives

I will take “Former New York Governors��? for $400 Alex. Question: An attorney, the 51st Governor of New York from 1975 to 1982, and a seven-term United States Representative from 1961–1974. Answer: “Who is Hugh Leo Carey?��?. Correct! The long and storied career of Hugh Carey makes him a giant of New York Politics, his achievements as governor and representative mark him as one of the finest political leaders in New York’s history. It is for these reasons that the state and country have mourned the passing of Hugh Carey in early August of this year.

One of the biggest events of Hugh Carey’s career was the New York City Fiscal Crisis of 1975. Hugh Carey entered office in 1974, and at that time New York City was on the verge of bankruptcy. At the time, New York City and its subdivisions had $14 billion of debt outstanding of which almost $6 billion was short-term. Hugh Carey appointed an advisory committee to monitor New York City affairs. One of the main recommendations of the advisory committee was the creation of a Municipal Assistance Corporation. The creation of the Municipal Assistance Corporation marked a turning point in the fiscal crisis, and the group began to implement changes to help the city out of the crisis.

The Municipal Assistance Corporation (MAC) was an independent corporation authorized to sell bonds to meet the borrowing needs of the city. The MAC demanded that the city institute a wage freeze, lay off employees, increase subway fares, and begin charging tuition at city universities. Despite a summer of labor unrest, these measures stuck and MAC was able to refinance some city debt, but the market was still resistant. The fiscal crisis was not totally resolves until 1981, the first year that the city was able to run a balanced budget.

Hugh Carey is most well known for his involvement in the fiscal crisis of the 1970’s but there were other major landmarks in his career. Carey cut taxes significantly, reduced corporate taxes from 14 percent to 10 percent, capped personal income tax at nine percent, and reduced capital gains taxes He also began an initiative to bring new investment to the city and the state as a whole by offering tax credits to encourage investment. As Governor he was responsible for building the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center; Battery Park City; the South Street Seaport and the economic development of the NYC boroughs outside Manhattan. He also secured state funds to begin construction on the Carrier Dome at Syracuse University.

For more information on Hugh Carey, you might try a few books that the library owns. They cover biographical information as well as his governorship, and some of the defining moments of his political career.
*The Man Who Saved New York: Hugh Carey and the Great Fiscal Crisis of 1975 by Seymour P. Lachmann and Robert Polner (Dewey Library HJ 9289 N4 L33 2010)
*The Days of Wine and Roses are Over: Governor Hugh Carey and New York State by Daniel C. Kramer (Dewey Library F 125.3 C37 K73 1997)
*The Crisis Regime: The MAC, The EFCB, and the Political Impact of the New York City Financial Crisis by Robert W. Bailey (Dewey Library HJ 9289 N4 B34 1984)

If you have any other questions about Hugh Carey, his governorship, the fiscal crisis, or anything make sure to contact out bibliographer for Political Science, Public Administration & Policy, and Law, Richard Irving. You can email him at rirving@albany.edu or give him a call at (518) 442-3698. He will be glad to help you find any further information you may need regarding Hugh Carey or other NYS governors.

Post created by Benjamin Knowles

October 2, 2011

Dewey Workshops 10/3-10/10/7

This week we are again offering our Federal Public Policy and Social Welfare Research Seminar workshops. We are also offering our University Libraries’ Website workshop and ICPSR, Data and Statistical Resources workshop. The University Libraries’ Website workshop will introduce you to the resources available on the library’s website such as the online catalog, research databases, UA Delivery, and Interlibrary Loan. The ICPSR, Data and Statistical Resources workshop will cover government and other not for profit sources of data and statistical resources on the Web.

The following sessions are scheduled this week:
Monday 10/3
4:30 pm: Federal Public Policy

Tuesday 10/4
2:00 pm: ICPSR, Data and Statistical Resources

Wednesday 10/5
2:00 pm: University Libraries’ Website
6:00 pm: ICPSR, Data and Statistical Resources

Friday 10/7
10:00 am: Social Welfare Research Seminar

If you’d like to sign up for an instruction session at Dewey you can do so online , in person at the reference desk, or by calling us at 442 3691.