Main

April 23, 2014

Human Trafficking - The Sex Trade

Human trafficking whether it be for the purpose of transporting illegal drugs, illegal labor or sexual exploitation has become a major international human rights/criminal justice concern.  Listed below are some resources researchers may consult that focus on the sexual exploitation aspect.


Books

 

Trafficking in slavery’s wake : law and the experience of women and children / edited by Benjamin N. Lawrance and Richard L. Roberts. Athens : Ohio University Press, c2012. Dewey Library / HQ 281 T7179 2012

 

Trafficking women’s human rights / Julietta Hua. Minneapolis : University of Minnesota Press, c2011. University Library / HQ 281 H82 2011

 

Not for sale : the return of the global slave trade-- and how we can fight it / David Batstone. New York : HarperSanFrancisco, c2007. University Library / HQ 281 B33 2007

 

Nobodies : modern American slave labor and the dark side of the new global economy / John Bowe. New York : Random House, c2007. University Library / HD 4865 U6 B68 2007

 

Understanding global slavery : a reader / Kevin Bales. Berkeley : University of California Press, c2005. University Library / HT 867 B38 2005

 

A crime so monstrous : face-to-face with modern-day slavery / E. Benjamin Skinner. New York : Free Press, 2008. University Library / HT 871 S45 2008

 

Abolishing slavery and its contemporary forms / David Weissbrodt and Anti-Slavery International. New York : Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, United Nations, 2002. University Library / Oversized *: K 3267 W45X 2002

 

Government Documents 

The next ten years in the fight against human trafficking : attacking the problem with the right tools : hearing before the Committee on Foreign Relations, United States Senate, One Hundred Twelfth Congress, second session, July 17, 2012. Washington : U.S. Government Printing Office, 2012. Online / GovDoc: J 85 Y 4.F 76/2:S.HRG.112-605.

 

Are government contractors exploiting workers overseas? : examining enforcement of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act : hearing before the Subcommittee on Technology, Information Policy, Intergovernmental Relations, and Procurement Reform of the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, One Hundred Twelfth Congress, first session, November 2, 2011. Washington : U.S. G.P.O. : For sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O., 2012. University Library / GovDoc: J 85 Y 4.G 74/7:112-93

 

Labor abuses, human trafficking, and government contractors : is the goviernment [sic] doing enough to protect vulnerable workers? : hearing before the Subcommittee on Technology, Information Policy, Intergovernmental Relations, and Procurement Reform of the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, House of Representatives, One Hundred Twelfth Congress, second session, March 27, 2012. Washington : U.S. G.P.O. : For sale by the Supt. of Docs., U.S. G.P.O., 2012. University Library / GovDoc: J 85 Y 4.G 74/7:112-137

 

Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2011 [electronic resource] : report together with additional and minority views (to accompany S. 1301) (including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office). [Washington, D.C. : U.S. G.P.O., 2011] Online / GovDoc: J 85 Y 1.1/5:112-96

 

Domestic minor sex trafficking [electronic resource] : hearing before the Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, and Homeland Security of the Committee on the Judiciary, House of Representatives, One Hundred Eleventh Congress, second session, September 15, 2010. Washington : U.S. G.P.O., 2011. Online / GovDoc: J 85 Y 4.J 89/1:111-146

 

Sex trafficking [electronic resource] : fact sheet. [Washington, D.C.] : Dept. of Health & Human Services, [Administration for Children and Families], National Human Trafficking Resource Center, [2011] Online / GovDoc: J 85 HE 25.2:T 67/2

 

CQ Researcher

 

Human Trafficking and Slavery: Are governments doing enough to eradicate the illicit trade? By Robert Kiener October 16, 2012, Volume 6, Issue 20

 

Human Trafficking and Slavery: Are the world's nations doing enough to stamp it out? By David Masci March 26, 2004 • Volume 14, Issue 12

 

CRS Reports

 

Trafficking in Persons: U.S. Policy and Issues for Congress by Alison Siskin and Liana Sun Wyler February 19, 2013 

 

Trafficking in Persons in Latin America and the Caribbean by Clare Ribando Seelke July 15, 2013 

 

Sex Trafficking of Children in the United States: Overview and Issues for Congress by Kristin M. Finklea, Adrienne L. Fernandes-Alcantara  and Alison Siskin. June 21, 2011


Web Sites

 

Child Trafficking Digital Library 

-          Includes country reports, definitions, laws and policy, prevention and rehabilitation information, etc

 

Walk Free Foundation’s Global Slavery Index 2013 

-          Ranks 162 countries by prevalence of slavery (including human trafficking and child marriage)

 

 Trends in State Courts 2013 by the National Center for State Courts 

-          Report on how human trafficking cases are handled in state courts

 

Human Trafficking Research, Justice Policy Center, Urban Institute 

-          Identifying Challenges to Improve the Investigation and Prosecution of State and Local Human Trafficking Cases Executive Summary 2012


If you would like more information on this important topic, talk to our Criminal Justice Librarian, Dick Irving. He can be reached at rirving@albany.edu or 442-23698. 

Blog post created by Cary Gouldin and Dick Irving

March 10, 2014

Topics in Criminal Justice: Felon Disenfranchisement

Disenfranchisement-Map-e1342163935236.gifOn February 11, Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. gave a speech at Georgetown University in which he called for the repeal of state laws which disenfranchise citizens convicted of felonies. Most states prohibit inmates from voting while in prison but Attorney General Holder directed his comments at state laws which prohibit convicted felons from voting after they are released from prison.

Researchers interested in exploring this topic may consider the following resources:

Books and Government Documents in the University Libraries

Living in Infamy: Felon Disfranchisement and the History of American Citizenship by Pippa Holloway. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013. Dewey Library /

Felony Disenfranchisement in America: Historical Origins, Institutional Racism, and Modern Consequences by Katherine Irene Pettus. Albany: State University of New York Press, c2013. Dewey Library / JK 1846 P48 2013.

Democracy Restoration Act of 2009: Hearing before the Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights, and Civil Liberties of the Committee on the Judiciary, House of Representatives, One Hundred Eleventh Congress, second session, on H.R. 3355, March 16, 2010. Washington: U.S. G.P.O., 2010. University Library and Online / GovDoc: J 85 Y 4.J 89/1:111-84.

The Disenfranchisement of Ex-Felons
by Elizabeth A. Hull. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2006. Dewey Library / KF 9747 Z95 H84 2006.

Locked Out: Felon Disenfranchisement and American Democracy by Jeff Manza and Christopher Uggen. Oxford, UK; New York: Oxford University Press, c2006. Dewey Library / JK 1846 M26 2006.

Civic Participation and Rehabilitation Act of 1999: Hearing before the Subcommittee on the Constitution of the Committee on the Judiciary, House of Representatives, One Hundred Sixth Congress, first session, on H.R. 906, October 21, 1999. Washington : U.S. G.P.O., 2000. University Library / GovDoc: J 85 Y 4.J 89/1:106/11.

Ex-Felon Voting Rights in Florida: Revised Rules of Executive Clemency that Automatically Restore Civil Rights to Level-1 Offenders is the Right Policy by the United States Commission on Civil Rights, Florida Advisory Committee. Washington: U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, 2008. Online / GovDoc: J 85 CR 1.2:V 94/6.

Bibliographic Databases

Westlaw - Source for law review articles on the topic

Worldwide Political Science Abstracts - Source for articles in political science journals

PAIS - Source for journal articles, government documents, think tank reports


CQ Researcher( online periodical accessible online through Minerva):

Voting Rights. October 29, 2004; Volume 14, Issue 38.
•General discussion of voting rights of minorities and felons, includes section “Should felons who have completed their sentences continue to be denied the right to vote?”

Prison-Building Boom. September 17, 1999; Volume 9, Issue 35.
•Pro/Con section on topic

Congressional Research Service ( accessible online through the GalleryWatch CRS database):

Judge Sonia Sotomayor: Analysis of Selected Opinions by Anna C. Henning, Legislative Attorney Kenneth R. Thomas, Legislative Attorney June 19, 2009.


Websites:

ACLU Map of State Felony Disenfranchisement Laws

ProCon.com Felon Voting Page:
Info, stats and opinions on state and federal level

Brennan Center for Justice report “Restoring the Right to Vote”; by Erika Wood

If you have an interest in researching felon disenfranchisement, you may wish to contact our Criminal Justice Subject Specialist, Richard Irving. He can be reached at 442-3698 or rirving@albany.edu

Bibliography by Cary Gouldin
Blog post by Richard Irving
Image source: http://witnessla.com/supreme-court/2012/taylorwalker/new-felon-disenfranchisement-report-sd-drops-reentry-program-that-cuts-recidivism-and-states-to-execute-mentally-disabled/

February 18, 2014

Sexual Assault in the Military

military-assault.jpgSen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) is the primary sponsor of a legislative proposal which would change the way the military responds to allegations of sexual assault. Sen. Gillibrand’s proposal would remove the decision regarding possible prosecutions from the military chain of command. Instead, it would have military lawyers make the decision. For a brief description regarding Sen. Gillibrand’s proposal and a discussion of the opposition see Scully, Megan. "Sex-Assault Proposal Faces Uphill Battle." CQ Weekly (November 18, 2013): 1928-29. Sen. Gillibrand’s proposal was expected to be voted on in the US Senate Feb. 10, 2014.

For more information regarding this issue see the library resources and websites listed below:

Books:

Investigating Sexual Harassment in Law Enforcement and Nontraditional Fields for Women by Penny E. Harrington and Kimberly A. Lonsway. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall, c2007. Dewey Library / HV 8141 H297 2007.

For Love of Country: Confronting Rape and Sexual Harassment in the U.S. Military by T.S. Nelson. New York: Haworth Maltreatment and Trauma Press, c2002. Dewey Library / UB 418 W65 N431 2002.

Congressional Hearings

Ruth Moore Act of 2013: Report (to accompany H.R. 671) (Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office). Washington: U. S. Government Printing Office, 2013. University Library / GovDoc: J 85 Y 1.1/8:113-63 and Online.

A Review of Sexual Misconduct by Basic Training Instructors at Lackland Air Force Base: Committee on Armed Services, House of Representatives, One Hundred Thirteenth Congress, first session, hearing held January 23, 2013. Washington: U.S. Government Printing Office, 2013. University Library / GovDoc: J 85 Y 4.AR 5/2 A:2013-2014/2 and Online.

Invisible Wounds: Examining the Disability Compensation Benefits Process for Victims of Military Sexual Trauma: Hearing before the Subcommittee on Disability Assistance and Memorial Affairs of the Committee on Veterans’ Affairs, U.S. House of Representatives, One Hundred Twelfth Congress, second session, Wednesday, July 18, 2012. Washington: U.S. Government Printing Office, 2013. University Library / GovDoc: J 85 Y 4.V 64/3:112-70 and Online.

Preventing Sexual Harassment: DOD Needs Greater Leadership Commitment and an Oversight Framework: Report to the Ranking Member, Subcommittee on National Security, Homeland Defense, and Foreign Operations, Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, House of Representatives. Washington: U.S. Govt. Accountability Office, 2011. Online / GovDoc: J 85 GA 1.13:GAO-11-809.

Military Personnel: DOD’s and the Coast Guard’s Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Programs Need to Be Further Strengthened: Testimony before the Subcommittee on National Security and Foreign Affairs, Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, House of Representatives / statement of Brenda S. Farrell, and Randolph C. Hite. Washington: U.S. Govt. Accountability Office, 2010. Online / GovDoc: J 85 GA 1.5/2:GAO-10-405 T.

CQ Researcher

Koons, Jennifer (2013). “Sexual Assault in the Military.” CQ Researcher, August 9, 2013, Volume 23, Issue 29.

Mantel, Barbara (2012). “Sexual Harassment”, CQ Researcher, April 27, 2012, Volume 22, Issue 16.

Clemmitt, Marcia (2009). “Women in the Military”, CQ Researcher, November 13, 2009, Volume 19, Issue 44.

CRS Reports

Military Sexual Assault: Chronology of Activity in Congress and Related Resources by Barbara Salazar Torreon. Washington: Congressional Research Services, July 30, 2013.

Websites

Service Women’s Action Network (SWAN)
- Advocates for the reformation of the Military Code of Justice
- Advocates for prevention and victim support programs

DOD Reports to Congress re Sexual Assault Prevention and Response
- Annual reports on sexual harassment and violence in the armed services and military service academies

DOD Safe Helpline
- Sexual Assault support and assistance network for DOD community

Army Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Program
- Sexual Assault Policy, prevention, training and reporting procedure


Bibliography compiled by Cary F. Gouldin
Introduction by Richard Irving

November 26, 2013

Topics in Criminal Justice: Researching Maritime Piracy

Piracy-and-Armed-Robbery-at-Sea-2011-198x300.jpgThe recently released feature film Captain Phillips has brought modern day piracy to the silver screen. The movie, based on an actual occurrence of piracy off the Horn of Africa, has raised public awareness of the crime which until recently most had thought was an outdated practice. However, in recent years maritime has become a more common occurrence off the Horn of Africa and the Nigerian coast as well.

At the time of the nation’s founding, piracy was so prevalent that it was actually addressed in the U.S. Constitution: Art. I, § 8, cl. 10, provides that Congress has the power “To define and punish Piracies and Felonies committed on the high seas, and Offenses against the Law of Nations.” At the time there was still some piracy taking place in the Caribbean but the principal concern was with the Barbary Pirates off the coast of North Africa. Although some have questioned whether the state sponsored activities of the Barbary Pirates could really be considered piracy, the United States fought several wars during the early 19th century to put an end to the practice. Until the recent spate of increase in piracy it was long thought to be a historical relic.

Here are some resources for those interested in researching this topic:

Books (Available in the University Libraries):
Somali piracy and terrorism in the Horn of Africa / Christopher L. Daniels. Lanham, Md. : Scarecrow Press, 2012. Dewey Library / HV 6433.786 S58 D46 2012 .

Maritime piracy / Robert Haywood and Roberta Spivak. London ; New York, NY : Routledge, c2012. Dewey Library / HV 6433.785 H39 2012.

Piracy and armed robbery at sea : the legal framework for counter-piracy operations in Somalia and the Gulf of Aden / Robin Geiss, Anna Petrig. Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2011. Dewey Library / KZ 7212 G45 2011.

Modern piracy : a reference handbook / David F. Marley. Santa Barbara, Calif. : ABC-CLIO, c2011. University Library / G 535 M327 2011.

Somalia, the new Barbary? : piracy and Islam in the Horn of Africa / Martin N. Murphy. New York : Columbia University Press, c2011. Dewey Library / HV 6433.786 S58 M87 2011.
The politics of the oceans / edited by Kenneth Partridge. Ipswich, Mass. : H.W. Wilson, 2011. University Library / JZ 3690 P38 2011.

Combating maritime piracy : a policy brief with recommendations for action / Robert I. Rotberg. Cambridge, MA : World Peace Foundation, 2010. University Library / K 5277 R68X 2010.
Small boats, weak states, dirty money : the challenge of piracy / Martin N. Murphy. New York : Columbia University Press, c2009. Dewey Library / HV 6431 M8746 2009.

Databases (Sources for academic journal articles):
Criminal Justice Abstracts
Military and Government Collection
PAIS
Worldwide Political Science Abstracts
Westlaw Campus
LexisNexis Academic

CQ Researcher:

Greenblatt, Alan. (2009) Attacking Piracy: Can the Growing Global Threat Be Stopped? CQ Researcher 3(8): 205-232.

Don't forget to take a look at the Congressional Research Service reports
(Available through GalleryWatch CRS Reports):
R. Chuck Mason, L. (2010). Piracy: A Legal Definition.
Lauren Ploch, A. (2011). Piracy off the Horn of Africa.
Ted Dagne, S. (2010). Somalia: Current Conditions and Prospects for a Lasting Peace.
Rawle O. King, A. (2009). Ocean Piracy and Its Impact on Insurance.

Websites:

Rand Corporation Maritime Piracy page:
Commentaries, news brief and reports on piracy for industries, governments and military organizations.

UN Division for Ocean Affairs and the Law of the Sea’s piracy page: http://www.un.org/Depts/los/piracy/piracy.htm.
--Includes legal framework for repression of piracy, piracy legislation from and between member countries, info on international law on piracy, links to all UN docs on piracy.

UN Interregional Crime and Justice Research Institute piracy page:
--Includes Database on Maritime Piracy Court Cases

International Maritime Organization Maritime Piracy page:
--Includes piracy statistics since 1992, best management practices for shippers, and monthly, quarterly and annual reports and pirate activity since 2010.

If you are interested in researching this topic, contact our Criminal Justice Bibliographer, Richard Irving, for assistance. He can be reached at 442-3698 or rirving@albany.edu.

Blog post created by Richard Irving and Cary Gouldin

October 22, 2013

Focus on Forensics: Advanced DNA Fingerprinting

DNA Lab.jpgA local murder case hinges on a controversial new DNA fingerprinting method, probabilistic genotyping, which uses specialized software to analyze low-quality and mixed DNA samples. While courts in Virginia, California and Pennsylvania have accepted this technique as evidence, it has yet to be used in a New York courtroom. Critics claim that the software has not been properly vetted because the company which developed has been secretive about how it works. Despite concerns, however, the State Comission on Forensic Science has approved the technology for casework and the State Police is poised to implement it in their crime lab.

Articles exploring the science, ethics and efficacy of probabilistic genetics and other advances in DNA fingerprinting can be found in databases like Criminal Justice Abstracts and Criminal Justice Periodicals Index and Westlaw. The University Libraries has a subscription to the Journal of Forensic Sciences, an excellent source for scientific articles on this topic.

The Libraries also has many books on DNA fingerprinting, which can be found by searching Minerva:
Advanced Topics in Forensic DNA Typing: Methodology by John M. Butler. Walthan, MA: Elsevier/Academic Press, c2012. Science Library / RA 1057.55 B87 2012.

Fundamentals of Forensic DNA Typing by John M. Butler. Amsterdam, [The Netherlands] ; Boston, MA : Academic Press/Elsevier, c2010. Science Library / RA 1057.55 B883 2010.

Tracing Technologies: Prisoners’ Views in the Era of CSI by Helena Machado, Barbara Prainsack. Farnham, Surrey; Burlington, VT: Ashgate, c2012. Dewey Library / HV 8073 M2192 2012.

A Litigator’s Guide to DNA: From the Laboratory to the Courtroom by Ron C. Michaelis, Robert G. Flanders, Jr. and Paula H. Wulff. Amsterdam; Boston, MA: Elsevier Academic Press, c2008. Dewey Library / KF 9666.5 M53 2008.

Who They Were: Inside the World Trade Center DNA Story: The Unprecedented Effort to Identify the Missing by Robert C. Shaler. New York: Free Press, c2005. Dewey Library / RA 1057.55 S53 2005.

For more information on DNA fingerprinting and other topics in criminal justice, contact bibliographer Dick Irving at 442-3698 or rirving@albany.edu.

Post created by Cary Gouldin

September 17, 2013

Topics in Criminal Justice: Legalizing Marihuana


The September 12, 2013 issue of the New York Times has a thought provoking editorial on its opinion page, “Legalizing Marihuana”. The editorial notes that while some states have legalized medical use of marihuana and others have legalized recreational use, the federal government still considers mere possession of marihuana to be a crime. Reconciling these different positions poses difficult problems for government agencies at both the state and federal level. The problems are not confined to law enforcement but include many public policy areas such as tax policy, consumer protection and health insurance. The University Libraries provides access to some excellent resources for researching the public policy aspects of the legalizing marihuana debate.

The CQ Researcher is a periodical which includes articles providing overviews of national public policy issues. It is available online through a link in the Minerva. Over the years it has published several articles on various public policy issues related to marihuana including a 2009 article, “Legalizing Marihuana” and a 2011 article, “Does Decriminalization Encourage Marijuana Use By Teens?”.
The Congressional Research Service produces reports on national public policy issues for the US Congress. We have access to their reports through the GalleryWatch CRS database. Relevant CRS reports on the topic include a 2013 report “State Marijuana Legalization Initiatives: Implications for Federal Law Enforcement” and another 2013 report “State Legalization of Recreational Marijuana: Selected Legal Issues”.

Committees of the US Congress hold hearings on policy issues. The hearings are referenced in the Proquest Congressional database. A 2004 hearing “Marijuana and Medicine: The Need for a Science-Based Approach”, and a 2001 hearing “Medical" Marijuana, Federal Drug Law and the Constitution's Supremacy Clause” are examples of hearings referenced. Most hearings for the last fifteen years can be accessed full text by performing a title search in Minerva.

Minerva is also an excellent sources for finding books and federal government documents on the topic. Here are a few examples:

Marijuana legalization : what everyone needs to know / Jonathan P. Caulkins, Angela Hawken, Beau Kilmer, and Mark A.R. Kleiman. New York : Oxford University Press, c2012. Dewey Library / HV 5822 M3 M2935 2012.

Marijuana legalization [electronic resource] : a bad idea / Office of National Drug Control Policy. [Washington, D.C.] : Office of National Drug Control Policy, Executive Office of the President, [2010]. Online / GovDoc: J 85 PREX 26.2:M 33/6.

Legalizing marijuana : drug policy reform and prohibition politics / Rudolph J. Gerber ; foreword by John Sperling. Westport, Conn. : Praeger, 2004. Dewey Library / HV 5822 M3 G47 2004.

Why marijuana should be legal / by Ed Rosenthal & Steve Kobby with S. Newhart. New York : Thunders Mouth Press, 2003. Dewey Library / HV 5822 M3 R57 2003.

Other databases such as PAIS, Westlaw, Criminal Justice Abstracts, and Sociological Abstracts, may be searched for academic journal articles. PAIS may also be useful for accessing reports from think tanks such as this 2010 report from the Rand Corporation “Insights on the Effects of Marijuana Legalization on Prices and Consumption”. Most think tanks make their research freely available online so a simple title search using Google will access the document.

Finally advocacy groups may be an important source of information as long as the researcher takes into account each groups general bias on the topic. Here are some advocacy groups for this topic:

Pro-Legalizaton Groups:
Drug Policy Alliance
Marijuana Policy Project

Anti-Legalization Groups:
Project SAM
Save Our Society from Drugs (S.O.S.)

One last note. Marijuana has an alternative spelling “marihuana”. Researchers should take into account the various spellings of terms as they are constructing their search strategies.

If you want more information on research strategies on this topic or other criminal justice and public policy topics, please contact Richard Irving, our criminal justice and public administration subject specialist. Email him at rirving@albany.edu or call him at 442-3698.

Blog by Richard Irving
Research assistance provided by Cary Gouldin

August 7, 2013

Pioneers in Criminal Justice

If you are a Criminal Justice student, you may be interested in some of the founders of modern thought within the field. The Dewey Graduate Library has a number of works about key innovators who changed the way we look at criminal justice issues. 

August Vollmer (March 7, 1876 - November 4, 1955) was a pioneer in police professionalism and advocated for major changes to the field. Early in his career, Vollmer was tagged a hero after singlehandedly preventing a train disaster. In 1909 he became the first Berkeley Chief of Police and didn’t retire until 1932. As Chief, he oversaw a complete reorganization of the police force and urged others to professionalize police work to a degree it had never been before. He began a conversation about and within the profession which continues to this day.

Check out:
Robinson, Jane Howard, and Gene E. Carte. August Vollmer : Pioneer In Police Professionalism / Interviews Conducted By Jane Howard Robinson. n.p.: Berkeley, Calif. : University of California, Bancroft Library, 1972-1983., 1972.
Dewey Library Oversized/HV 7911 V6 A84X 1972 V.2

-------

O.W. Wilson (May 15, 1900-October 18, 1972) was taught by August Vollmer, and went on to establish the first Police Science degree. He impressed upon his superiors, colleagues, and the academic community the importance and value of a police education. He taught at Harvard in the 1930’s and authored several books on Police Science which highlighted the need for a scholarly approach to Police training and Police administration.

Check out:
Bopp, William J. "O.W.": O. W. Wilson and the search for a police profession Port Washington, N.Y. : Kennikat Press, 1977.
Dewey Library / HV 7911 W54 B66

In addition you may be interested in some of these other books in our collection:

Dale, Elizabeth. Criminal justice in the United States, 1789-1939.Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2011.
Dewey Library / HV 9950 D35 2011

Oliver, W.M. and Marion, N.E. The making of criminal justice policy in the United States : essays on the role of the President, the Congress, and the public. Lewiston : Edwin Mellen, c2008.
Dewey Library / HV 9950 M25 2008

If you are interested in learning more about those who have contributed to modern criminal justice thought, please contact Criminal Justice Bibliographer Dick Irving at ririving@albany.edu or 442-3698.

Blog post created by Laurie Buckley

July 8, 2013

Meet Your Library Subject Specialist: Richard Irving

Dick.jpg

Our ongoing blog series, where you can get to know your Dewey Librarians, continues with our second subject specialist, Dick Irving. Dick is the subject specialist for Criminal Justice, Public Administration and Policy, Political Science and Law. 

Q: What does your position at Dewey entail day-to-day?

A: Working at the reference desk, selecting materials for the libraries, conducting instructional sessions for users, preparing LibGuides, appointments with students and faculty regarding their research projects, doing my own research, committee meetings.

Q: How did you find your way to librarianship? 
A: I wanted a career in education and an employment counselor suggested I investigate pursuing librarianship.

Q: Where did you study?
A: M.L.S. at SUC Geneseo
    M.A. in criminal Justice at University at Albany

Q: What professional development activities do you partake in?
A: I occasionally attend conferences and am currently the book review editor for the Criminal Law
 Bulletin

Q: What other positions have you held and what are some important lessons you took away from them?
A: My first professional position was librarian at the Attica Correctional Facility.  That position helped me to think deliberatively and develop an incremental change philosophy.

Q: How do you choose which resources to acquire for the collection?
A: Various professional tools such as Choice, recommendations from faculty and students, publishers’ catalogs, academic presentations, and reports in the popular media.

Q: How do you break-up/dedicate your collections budget? What do you prioritize?
A: I select materials with a research emphasis and that will hopefully be of value for a long time.  There is a balance between monographs and academic journals.  Unfortunately the escalating subscription prices of academic journals prevent us from acquiring all the academic journals we would like.  However, some of the databases we purchase as well as our interlibrary loan service help to provide access to materials not in our collections.


Q: How do you approach teaching library seminars & teaching information literacy?
A: Depends on the audience.  If I am addressing a class with a research assignment I attempt to recommend specific sources and I usually create a LibGuide for the class to refer back to.  For more general session I try to use a hands-on approach with mainly online sources and go over some of the key features of the sources.


Q: What technology do you use in the course of performing your duties?
A: We have some specialized software such as LibGuides and computer applications designed for library operations but for the most part nothing unusual.


Q: What are some of the most amazing changes in librarianship you've seen throughout your career?
A: The transition from print to digital format and the proliferation of information due largely to the Internet.

Q: What do you think/hope the future will entail?
A: Improved methods for allowing researchers to sift through the vast amounts of information available to identify quality sources.

Q: What is the most rewarding part of being a librarian? What challenges you the most?
A: The most rewarding part is working with faculty/students on their research projects.  The most challenging is adapting to new technologies.

If you need research assistance in criminal justice, public policy/administration, political science or law, contact Dick at 442-3698 or ririving@albany.edu.


Blog post created by Laurie Buckley and Dick Irving. 


June 24, 2013

Criminal Justice Careers

Ifyou’re a Criminal Justice student interested in learning how to put your degree, education, & experience to work for you—look no further! With a degree in Criminal Justice you can find employment in a number of different occupations.  Or you can choose to continue your education in an area of concentration of particular interest to you, including but not limited to:

  • Law Enforcement Administration
  • Correctional Administration
  • Research and Teaching
  • Lawyer
  • Paralegal
  • Corrections Officer
  • Judge
  • Police, Detective, FBI, DEA, U.S.Marshal, INS, Customs Inspector
  • Private Detective, Investigator
  • Probation Officer
  • Court Reporter

Professional associations are also excellent places to find information about different careers.  Here are a few professional associations that maintain resources on Criminal Justice careers:

Need further guidance?  Try our collection:

At Dewey Library:

Criminal Justice and Criminology : a career guide to local, state, federal and academic positions>, by James F. Anderson, Nancie Jean Mangels, and Laronistine Dyson. / Dewey: HV 9950 A54X 2003

Criminal justice internships :theory into practice by Gary R. Gordon, R. Bruce McBride, Hedy Hyde Hage. / Dewey: HV 9950 G66 2001

Career opportunities in law and the legal industry by Susan Echaore-McDavid. / Dewey Reference: HF 5381 E358X 2007

At the University Library:
Federal Law Enforcement Careers: profiles of 250 high-powered positions and tactics for getting hired,by Thomas H. Ackerman - University Library / Reference: HF 5381 A3544X 2006

FBI Careers : the ultimate guide to landing a job as one of America’s finest, by Thomas H. Ackerman - University Library / Reference: HF 5381 A354X 2006

Opportunities in Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice Careers,by James Stinchcomb - University Library / Reference: HF 5381 S86X 2003

Great Jobs for Criminal Justice Majors, by Stephen Lambert and Debra Regan - University Library / Reference: HF 5381 L2537X 2001

Career Opportunities in Forensic Science, by Susan Echaore-McDavid and Richard A. McDavid - University Library / Reference: HF 5381 E62X 2008

For more information about Criminal Justice careers, see the School of Criminal
Justice’s Careers in Criminal Justice page, and don't forget to check out theirJob Search Strategies. Another great resource is the Department of Labor’s Occupational Outlook Handbook.

For more information on Criminal Justice career resources, talk to Dick Irving, our Subject Specialist in Criminal Justice. He can be reached at rirving@albany.edu or 442-3698.

Blog post updated by Laurie Buckley

April 9, 2013

Justice and Multiculturalism Spring Symposium


The School of Criminal Justice’s project Justice & Multiculturalism in the 21st Century aims to engage the University at Albany community on issues of social justice and criminal justice. Activities include a film series, speaker series, faculty speakers bureau, pilot mentoring for local high school students, and a writing competition for undergraduates. This year’s Spring Symposium takes place on April 25 and 26 with the theme Explorations in Justice: Gender, Sexuality, and Violence. The keynote speaker is Dr. Joanne Belknap, professor of sociology at the University of Colorado and President Elect, of the American Society of Criminology. Check out her publications at the University Libraries!

The invisible woman: Gender, crime, and justice. Joanne Belknap. Australia; USA; Belmont, CA: Thomson/Wadsworth, c2007.
Dewey Library HV 9950 B45 2007

A longitudinal study of battered women in the System [electronic resource]: The victims' and decision-makers' perceptions: submitted to the National Institute of Justice, research and evaluation on violence against women: final report. Principal investigator, Joanne Belknap ; co-principal investigator, Cris M. Sullivan. [Washington, D.C.: National Institute of Justice, 2002]
Online / GovDoc: J 85 J 28.2:B 32/2

If you have any questions about the Spring Symposium, please contact the Justice and Multiculturalism project by phone at 442-5212 or email.

Blog post created by Kathryn Farrell

March 19, 2013

NY SAFE Act and the Gun Control Debate

gun control.jpg
Gun control and the interpretation of the Second Amendment have been highly contested throughout the history of the United States. The recent NYS Safe Act has brought the issue of gun control the forefront, causing some residents to rejoice and others to protest in anger. Regardless of opinion, the issues surrounding the right to bear arms are here to stay.
There are countless organizations that focus on the issue of gun control. The National Rifle Association (NRA) and the Coalition to Stop Gun Violence (CSGV) are among the leading voices on the issue. The NRA was founded in 1871 and is now the world’s premier firearms education organization. The NRA is a major political force with strong pro-gun beliefs. The CSGV has a very different view on gun control. This organization strives for stricter gun control policies.

The Dewey Library also has many useful materials on gun control that include both sides of the argument. Check out the following books for more information:

Living with guns: A liberal's case for the Second Amendment
. Craig R. Whitney. New York: Public Affairs, c2012.
Dewey Library KF 3941 W4425 2012

Gunfight: The battle over the right to bear arms in America
. Adam Winkler. New York, NY: W.W. Norton & Co., c2011.
Dewey Library KF 3941 W56 2011

More guns, less crime: Understanding crime and gun-control laws
. John R. Lott, Jr. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, c2010.
Dewey Library KF 3941 L68 2010

Gun crusaders: The NRA's culture war
. Scott Melzer. New York : New York University Press, c2009. Dewey Library HV 7436 M45 2009

Out of range: Why the Constitution can't end the battle over guns
. Mark V. Tushnet. Oxford, UK; New York: Oxford University Press, c2007.
Dewey Library KF 3941 T872 2007

Guns, gun control, and elections: The politics and policy of firearms. Harry L. Wilson. Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield, c2007.
Dewey Library HV 7436 W55 2007

Gun control in the United States: A reference handbook. Gregg Lee Carter. Santa Barbara, Calif.: ABC-CLIO, c2006.
Dewey Library Reference HV 7436 C36 2006

A well-regulated militia: The founding fathers and the origins of gun control in America
. Saul Cornell. Oxford, UK; New York: Oxford University Press, c2006.
Dewey Library KF 4558 2ND C67 2006

If you have any questions about finding relevant materials at the Dewey Library, please contact our Criminal Justice bibliographer Richard Irving. He can be reached by phone at 442-3698 or email rirving@albany.edu.

Blog created by Kathryn Farrell

February 19, 2013

Reauthorizing VAWA

The Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (VAWA) was introduced in the Senate in late January. According to the New York Times, on February 4, a motion to “proceed to consideration of measure” was agreed upon in the Senate as well as a motion to “proceed to measure” was considered in the Senate. The next step is for the bill to be passed in the Senate.

VAWA was originally passed by Congress in 1994 (Seghetti & Bjelopera, 2012, p. 4). This act created measures that protected women including better investigations and prosecutions of sex acts. VAWA was passed as a necessary response to increased violence against women. In 2000, VAWA was reauthorized through the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act (Seghetti & Bjelopera, 2012, p. 12). More protections for battered immigrants, new programs for elderly and disabled women, and a program for victims requiring transitional housing were among the reauthorization changes.

Congress also reauthorized VAWA in 2005 and 2011. The 2011 act was amended and passed in April 2012 (Kandel, 2012, p. 16). This year, the discussion of reauthorizing VAWA has been proposed. One of the most highly contested issues within the 2013 reauthorization act is the provision that American Indian women who are assaulted by non-Indian men can go to tribal courts which do not have jurisdiction over people not living on Indian land (Weisman, 2012). According to a BJS Statistical Profile, American Indian women are victims of violent crimes at a much higher rate than non-Indian women (Smith & Thompson, 2012. p. 4). Other new initiatives extend coverage to gay and lesbian victims and battered immigrant women.

If the 2013 reauthorization act is passed in the Senate, it will then need to be passed by the House of Representatives before being signed into law. For more information on VAWA, please read the articles referenced above:

Kandel, W. Immigration provisions of the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA). Congressional Research Service (2012).

Seghetti, L. & Bjelopera, J. The Violence Against Women Act: Overview, legislation, and federal funding. Congressional Research Service (2012).

Smith, J. & Thompson, R. Tribal criminal jurisdiction over non-Indians in S. 1925, the Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) reauthorization. Congressional Research Service (2012).
Weisman, J. (2013, February 4). Violence act returns in test of republicans’ appeal to women.
New York Times, Retrieved from www.nytimes.com.
There are also several books at the Dewey Library related to violence against women. For relevant materials check out the following books:

The batterer as parent: addressing the impact of domestic violence on family dynamics. Lundy Bancroft, Jay G. Silverman, Daniel Ritchie. Thousand Oaks, Calif.: SAGE, c2012.
Dewey Library HV 6626.2 B25 2012

Structural violence: hidden brutality in the lives of women. Joshua M. Price. Albany: State University of New York Press, c2012.
New Books Display Dewey Library HV 6250.4 W65 P724 2012

The political economy of violence against women. Jacqui True. New York: Oxford University Press, c2012.
Dewey Library HV 6250.4 W65 T78 2012

Violence against women: myths, facts, controversies
. Walter S. DeKeseredy. Toronto; Tonawanda, NY: University of Toronto Press, c2011.
Dewey Library HV 6250.4 W65 D428 2011

Gendered justice: intimate partner violence and the criminal justice system. Venessa Garcia and Patrick McManimon. Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, c2011.
Dewey Library HV 6626 G36 2011

For more information on VAWA, please contact our criminal justice bibliographer Richard Irving. He can be reached by phone at 442-3698 or email.

November 14, 2012

Next in Justice and Multiculturalism Series at Criminal Justice School


Day, Night, Day, Night , the third in a series of films sponsored by the Justice and Multiculturalism in the 21st Century project, will be shown on Friday, November 30th at 7:30 pm in Page Hall.

Day, Night, Day, Night received the Prix Regards Jeune (Directors' Fortnight) at the 2006 Cannes Film Festival. The film follows a 19-year-old American girl of unknown beliefs or political affiliations as she undertakes a series of meticulous preparations to blow herself up in New York City's Times Square.

Dr. Robert Worden, School of Criminal Justice, and Dr. Brian Nussbaum, Rockefeller College of Public Affairs (currently Visiting Professor of Homeland Defense at the United States Army War College), will lead audience discussion after the film.

Justice and Multiculturalism in the 21st Century is a project of the UAlbany School of Criminal Justice. It includes a lecture series, film series and a symposium planned for Spring 2013. More information about the project is available at the Justice Institute website.

Blog post created by Dick Irving

October 9, 2012

Multiculturalism and Justice Series


On Friday, October 12, Victor Streib, J.D. will be presenting a lecture, “Death to the Women and Children” in the Standish Room, Science Library at 4:00 pm. The lecture is part of the Justice and Multiculturalism in the 21st Century project sponsored by the School of Criminal Justice. Dean Streib is the former Dean and Professor Emeritus at the Northern Ohio University School of Law. He is acknowledged to be one of the foremost experts on the application of the death penalty sentence to women and juveniles. Not only has he published numerous journal articles and books on the death penalty, but he also co-authored the principal brief arguing against the death penalty in Thompson v. Oklahoma 487 U.S. 815 (1987). In Thompson the Supreme Court prohibited the execution of individuals under the age of sixteen at the time of the crime. His work was also heavily cited in another Supreme Court case, Roper v. Simmons, 543 U.S. 551 (2005) in which the court did away with the death penalty for offenders under the age of 18 at the time of the crime.

Dean Streib’s lecture is associated with the announcement of his donation of his personal papers to the National Death Penalty Archive at the University at Albany. Several of his books are available at the University Libraries including; Juvenile Justice in America (1978), Death Penalty for Juveniles(1987), and The Fairer Death: executing women in Ohio(2006).

Each of the series of lectures in the Justice and Multiculturalism in the 21st Century project’s series is followed by a film on a related topic the following week. The Execution of Wanda Jean will be shown on Friday, October 19, at 7:30 pm at Page Hall. This documentary film depicts the clemency appeal of mentally-impaired death row inmate Wanda Jean Allen. The failure of the appeal resulted in her execution on January 11, 2001. Wanda Jean Allen was the first black women to be executed in the United States since 1954. University at Albany professors Vivien Ng and James Acker will lead a discussion of the issues surrounding the case immediately following the film.

Blog post created by Dick Irving

September 18, 2012

Justice and Multiculturalism Lecture and Film Series

RafterPhotosmall.jpgNoted criminologist, Nicole Rafter will be giving a presentation “Justice, Gender, and Multicultural Issues” at noon on Thursday, September 20 in the Emerson Community Hall at the First Unitarian Universalist Society of Albany. The First Unitarian Universalist Society of Albany is located at 405 Washington Ave. (directly across the street from Draper Hall on the downtown campus). This is the first in a series of events as part of the “Justice & Multiculturalism in the 21st Century” project sponsored by the School of Criminal Justice. Professor Rafter is a faculty member in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Northeastern University. She is the author/co-author of numerous books including; The Criminal brain: Understanding Biological Theories of Crime (2008), Criminology Goes to the Movies: Crime Theory and Popular Culture(2011), Shots in the Mirror: Crime Films and Society (2006), Partial Justice: Women, Prison, and Social Control(1990), all of which are included within the University Libraries’ collections.

Kinyarwanda Postersmall.jpgThe “Justice & Multiculturalism in the 21st Century” project will include additional presentations. A film series, and a Spring Symposium. The first film, “Kinyarwanda”, will be shown Friday, September 28th at 7:30 pm in Page Hall. There will be a public reception at 6:30 pm , and an opportunity to direct questions to the film’s producer, Darren Dean, and leading actress, Hadidja Zaninka, following the showing. The film won the World Cinema Audience Award (Dramatic) at the 2011 Sundance Film Festival and concerns the genocide in Rwanda. The University Libraries‘ collections include many books dealing with various aspects of the genocide in Rwanda. A subject search “Rwanda -- History -- Civil War, 1994 - Atrocities” in Minerva will result in a list of many titles including; Court of Remorse: Inside the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda(2010), Christianity and Genocide in Rwanda(2010), Intimate Enemy: Images and Voices of the Rwandan Genocide (2006), Eyewitness to a Genocide: the United Nations and Rwanda(2002).

Blog post created by Dick Irving

July 6, 2012

Summer Reading List: Criminal Justice

Looking for a good mystery to add to your summer reading list? Check out the Lizzie Stuart series, written by UAlbany criminal justice professor Frankie Bailey. Lizabeth Stuart is a criminal justice professor and crime historian (with a Ph.D. from UAlbany) whose career as an amateur sleuth begins while she is on vacation in Cornwall, England. All five mysteries in this series can be found at the University Library.

Deaths Favorite Child.jpgDeath’s Favorite Child by Frankie Y. Bailey. Johnson City, TN: Silver Dagger Mysteries, c2000. University Library / PS 3552 A368 D43 2000.

African-American crime historian Lizzie Stuart has spent most of her life in Drucilla, Kentucky. When her grandmother dies, Lizzie decides it is time for a vacation. She joins her friend Tess for a week in Cornwall, England, in the resort town of St. Regis. Lizzie finds her vacation anything but restful when she becomes an eyewitness to a murder and the probable next victim.

A Dead Man’s Honor
by Frankie Y. Bailey. Johnson City, TN: Silver Dagger Mysteries, c2001. University Library / PS 3552 A368 D426 2001.

Professor Stuart is spending a year in Virginia researching a lynching that her grandmother witnessed as a young girl, and ghosts seem to be haunting her dreams and her waking hours. When another professor at the university is murdered, she endangers herself by becoming involved in an investigation that could uncover police corruption.

Old Murders.jpgOld Murders by Frankie Y. Bailey. Johnson City, TN: Silver Dagger Mysteries, c2003. University Library / PS 3552 A368 O54X 2003.

If you think life in a small Southern town is boring, then you’ve never been to Gallagher, Virginia. While a bitter battle for the heart of downtown Gallagher is brewing between an out-of-town multimillionaire real estate developer and a local entrepreneur, it’s discovered that a local artist is missing. At the same time, a story of a 50-year-old murder resurfaces and someone wants to make sure the truth about the case is buried forever..

You Should Have Died on Monday by Frankie Y. Bailey. Johnson City, TN: Silver Dagger Mysteries, c2007. University Library / PS 3552 A368 Y68 2007.

Criminal justice professor Lizabeth Stuart investigates her paternity and her long-lost mother's checkered past in Bailey's fourth mystery, a story rich in history. Raised by her grandparents in Drucilla, KY, Lizzie never knew her mother, Becca Hayes, who abandoned her at birth. Now 39 years old and on the verge of engagement to her boyfriend, police officer John Quinn, Lizzie is especially determined to understand her past. With help from Quinn and PI Kyle Sheppard, she connects her mother to Chicago gangster Nick Mancini, who was stabbed to death in 1969. After 22-year-old Becca, who was Nick's girlfriend and the chief suspect, disappeared without a trace, musician Robert Montgomery confessed to the crime. Decades later, Lizzie's effort to track down the key players in this drama takes her from her home in Gallagher, VA to Chicago, Wilmington, NC and finally New Orleans.

Forty Acres.jpgForty Acres and a Soggy Grave by Frankie Y. Bailey. Johnson City, TN: Silver Dagger Mysteries c2011. University Library / PS 3552 A368 F67X 2011.

Sometimes the person you love isn't the person you thought you knew. Crime historian Lizzie Stuart and her fiancé, John Quinn, travel to a farm on the Eastern Shore of Virginia for a weekend gathering of his old West Point buddies. Amid Mexican migrant laborers and struggling black farmers, money, politics, and war mix with too many secrets from the past and too many lies in the present, and the weekend turns deadly.

Blog post created by Cary Gouldin


May 30, 2012

Criminal Justice Faculty Spotlight: James Acker, Distinguished Teaching Professor

James Acker is a Distinguished Teaching Professor in the criminal justice program at the University at Albany. His research interests include the integration of social science into law, and legal doctrine relating to criminal procedure, criminal law, juvenile justice, miscarriages of justice, and capital punishment. Professor Acker began his career as a lawyer with a JD from the Duke University School of Law. After four years in private practice, he returned to school to earn an MA and a PhD in criminal justice from the University at Albany. He became a University faculty member in 1988.

Professor Acker has written or contributed to many books that can be found in the Libraries’ collection. Recent books include:

Criminal Law by David C. Brody and James R. Acker, 2nd edition, Sudbury, MA: Jones & Bartlett Publishers, 2010.
Dewey Library / KF 9219 B73 2001

“Scrutinizing the Death Penalty: State Death Penalty Study Commissions and Their Recommendations” in The Death Penalty Today edited by Robert M. Bohm, New York: CRC Press, 2008, pages 29-59.
Dewey Library / KF 9227 C2 D43 2008

The Future of America’s Death Penalty: An Agenda for the Next Generation of Capital Punishment Research edited by Charles S. Lanier, William J. Bowers and James R. Acker, Durham, NC: Carolina Academic Press, 2009.
Dewey Library / KF 9227 C2 F885 2008

“Capital Punishment,” in Governing America: Major Decisions of Federal, State, and Local Governments from 1789 to the Present edited by Paul J. Quirk & William Cunion, New York: Facts on File, 2011, pages 829-839.
Dewey Library / Reference: JK 468 P64 Q55 2011

“Hearing the Victim’s Voice Amidst the Cry for Capital Punishment,” in Handbook of Restorative Justice: A Global Perspective edited by Dennis Sullivan & Larry Tifft, Taylor and Francis, 2006, pages 246-260.
Dewey Library / HV 8688 H36 2006

Scottsboro and Its Legacy: The Cases That Challenged American Legal and Social Justice by James R. Acker, Westport, CT: Praeger Press, 2008.
Dewey Library / KF 224 S34 A25 2008

Wounds That Do Not Bind: Victim-Based Perspectives on the Death Penalty edited by James R. Acker & David R. Karp, Durham, NC: Carolina Academic Press, 2006.
Dewey Library / HV 8694 W68 2006

Wrongful Conviction: Law, Science, and Policy
by James R. Acker & Allison D. Redlich, Durham, NC: Carolina Academic Press, 2011.
Dewey Library / KF 9756 A25 2011

Professor Acker has also published many articles in journals you can find in the Libraries’ databases. Some of the most recent include:

“Firmament or Folly? Protecting the Innocent, Promoting Capital Punishment, and the Paradoxes of Reconciliation” by James R. Acker and Rose Bellandi, Justice Quarterly: JQ, 29.2 (2012), 287-307.

“Miscarriages of Justice: ‘Better that Ten Guilty Persons Escape than that One Innocent Suffer’: Appraising the Blackstone Ration in 2011” by James R. Acker, foreword, Albany Law Review, 74.3 (2011), 1067-1070.

“’Than That One Innocent Suffer’: Evaluating State Safeguards Against Wrongful Convictions” by Robert J. Norris, Catherine L. Bonventre, Allison D. Redlich and James R. Acker, Albany Law Review, 74.3 (2011), 1301-1361.

“Protecting the Innocent in New York: Moving Beyond Changing Only Their Names” by James R. Acker and Catherine L. Bonventre, Albany Law Review, 73.4 (2010), 1245-1356.

“Wrongful Convictions Then and Now: Lessons to Be Learned” by James R. Acker, Albany Law Review, 73.4 (2010), 1207-1211.

“The Death Penalty Loses Its Mind: An Interview with James Acker” by Dennis Sullivan, Contemporary Justice Review 13.4 (2010), 477-486.

“The Power to be Lenient: Examining New York Governors’ Capital Case Clemency Decisions” by Talia Harmon, James R. Acker and Craig Rivera, Justice Quarterly 27.5 (2010), 742-764.

“Merciful Justice: Lessons from Fifty Years of New York Death Penalty Commutations” by James R. Acker, Talia Harmon and Craig Rivera, Criminal Justice Review 35.2 (2010), 183-199.

“Actual Innocence: Is Death Different?” by James R. Acker, Behavioral Sciences and Law 27.3 (2009), 297-311.

“’The Time . . . Has Surely Arrived’: Justice Stevens and the Death Penalty” by James R. Acker, Contemporary Justice Review 13.3 (2008), 287-289.

“Be Careful What You Ask For: Lessons from New York’s Recent Experience with Capital Punishment” by James R. Acker, Vermont Law Review 32.4 (2008), 683-763.

“Impose an Immediate Moratorium on Executions” by James R. Acker, Criminology & Public Policy 6.4 (2007), 641-650.

“Accommodation, Sponsorship and Religious Activities in Prison” by Hans Toch and James R. Acker, Criminal Law Bulletin 42.3 (2006), 261-288.

For assistance researching these and other criminal justice topics, contact subject specialist Dick Irving at rirving@albany.edu or 442-3698.

Blog post created by Cary Gouldin

May 29, 2012

Criminal Justice Gets a new Bibliographer

Dick CJ Bib.jpgRichard Irving will be taking over as bibliographer for the criminal justice collection. Bibliographers are the librarians who are responsible for managing the library collections for particular subject areas including acquiring new books, journal subscriptions, and databases. They are the principal library contact persons for people performing library research in their respective subject areas.In addition to criminal justice, Dick is bibliographer for public administration and policy, political science and law. He has a M.A. in criminal justice in addition to a M.L.S.

He has authored or co-authored many academic journal articles including this most recent article available in online preprint:Journals Supporting Terrorism Research: Identification and Investigation into their Impact on the Social Sciences (Scheduled for publication January 2013)

He is also the co-author with James R. Acker of the monograph, Basic Legal Research for Criminal Justice and the Social Sciences, which is available in the Dewey Reference Collection: Dewey Library / Reference: KF 241 C75 A28 1998.

Dick can be contacted at 442-6898 or a rirving@albany.edu.

April 17, 2012

Faculty Spotlight: Dana Peterson, Assistant Professor, Criminal Justice

Dana Peterson is an assistant professor in the criminal justice program at University at Albany. She serves as an Investigator for “Process and Outcome Evaluation of G.R.E.A.T. (Gang Resistance Education and Training),” an evaluation of a multi-site gang prevention program. She is also serves as Co-Investigator for SOAR (Service Outcomes Action Research), a project to develop and implement evidence-based practice at organizations that provide treatment to children and families. She also serves on the Boys and Girls Clubs of America’s Youth Gang Advisory Board and is an active member of the Eurogang Program.

Professor Peterson’s research interests include youth gangs and violence, juvenile justice, youth gang intervention and prevention, juvenile treatment, and sex and gender issues in gangs and delinquency. She is particularly interested in the debate over the efficacy of gender-based theories and responses to youth gangs and delinquency, and the effects gender has on the structures of delinquency and gang involvement.

Professor Peterson has written or contributed to several books that you can find in the University Libraries’ collections:

Peterson, Dana. 2012. “Girlfriends, Gun-holders, and Ghetto-rats? Moving Beyond Narrow Views of Girls in Gangs.” In Delinquent Girls: Contexts, Relationships, and Adaptation, edited by Shari Miller, Leslie D. Leve, and Patricia K. Kerig. New York: Springer.

Esbensen, Finn-Aage, Dana Peterson, Terrance J. Taylor, and Adrienne Freng. 2010. Youth Violence: Sex and Race Differences in Offending, Victimization, and Gang Membership. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press.
University Library / HQ 799.2 V56 Y684 2010

Peterson, Dana. 2009. “The Many Ways of Knowing: Multi-method Comparative Research to Enhance our Understanding of and Responses to Youth Street Gangs.” in Handbook on Crime and Deviance, edited by Marv D. Krohn, Alan J. Lizotte, and Gina Penly Hall. New York: Springer Science and Business Media.
Dewey Library / HV 6025 H278X 2009

Esbensen, Finn-Aage, Dana Peterson, Terrance J. Taylor, Adrienne Freng, and D. Wayne Osgood. 2004. “Gang Prevention: A Case Study of a Primary Prevention Program.”in American Youth Gangs at the Millennium, edited by in Finn-Aage Esbensen, Larry K. Gaines, and Stephen G. Tibbetts Prospect Heights, IL: Waveland Press.
Dewey Library / HV 6439 U5 E73 2004

Peterson, Dana. 2003. “Girls and Boys Town.” in Encyclopedia of Juvenile Justice, edited by Marilyn D. McShane and Frank P. Williams III. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
Dewey Library / Reference: HV 9104 E58 2003

Esbensen, Finn-Aage, Adrienne Freng, Terrance J. Taylor, Dana Peterson, and D. Wayne Osgood. 2002. “Putting Research Into Practice: The National Evaluation of the Gang Resistance Education and Training (G.R.E.A.T.) Program.” in Winifred L. Reed and Scott H. Decker (Eds.), Responding to Gangs: Evaluation and Research, Research Report. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice.
University Library / GovDoc: J 85 J 28.2:G 15

Esbensen, Finn-Aage, Dana Peterson, Adrienne Freng, and Terrance J. Taylor. 2002. “Initiation of Drug Use, Drug Sales, and Violent Offending Among a Sample of Gang and Non-Gang Youth.” in Gangs in America, 3rd Edition, edited by C. Ronald Huff. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
Dewey Library / HV 6439 U5 G36 2002

She has also authored many articles that have been published in scholarly journals. Some of her most recent include:

Esbensen, Finn-Aage, Dana Peterson, Terrance J. Taylor, Adrienne Freng, D. Wayne Osgood, Dena C. Carson, and Kristy N. Matsuda. "Evaluation and Evolution of the Gang Resistance Education and Training (G.R.E.A.T.) Program.” Journal of School Violence. 10(1): 53-70. Available through Education Research Complete.

Esbensen, Finn-Aage, Dana Peterson, Terrance J. Taylor, and Adrienne Freng. 2009. ”Similarities and Differences in Risk Factors for Youth Violence and Gang Membership.” Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology. 42(3): 310-335. Available at Dewey Library (Periodical HV 6001 A9) or through Academic Search Complete.

Taylor, Terrance J., Adrienne Freng, Finn-Aage Esbensen, and Dana Peterson. 2008. “Youth Gang Membership & Serious Violent Victimization: The importance of lifestyles/routine activities.” Journal of Interpersonal Violence 23(10): 1441-1464. Available through Criminology: A SAGE Full-Text Collection.

Esbensen, Finn-Aage, Chris Melde, Terrance J. Taylor, and Dana Peterson. 2008. “Active Parental Consent in School-Based Research: How Much is Enough and How Do We Get It?” Evaluation Review 32(4): 335-362. Available at Dewey Library (Periodical H 1 E73X) or through the publisher’s website [http://libms1.albany.edu:8991/F/IXMN9K3YRIVGMCCIA86H589M1EFECDJJIRBP3HMQTLGQEUC1LR-65667?func=item-global&doc_library=ALB01&doc_number=000961539&year=&volume=&sub_library=ALBR]

Englebrecht, Christine, Dana Peterson, Aaron Scherer, and Toni Naccarato. 2008. “It's Not My Fault: Acceptance of Responsibility as a Component of Engagement.” Children and Youth Services Review 30(4): 466-484. Available through SUNY Science Direct Titles.

A complete list of Professor Peterson’s publications can be found on her Curriculum Vita For research assistance, contact Mary Jane Burstman, our criminal justice bibliographer, at 442-3540 or mbrustman@albany.edu.

Blog post created by Cary Gouldin

March 20, 2012

Faculty Spotlight: Graeme Newman, Distinguished Teaching Professor

Professor Newman is a Distinguished Teaching Professor here in the University at Albany’s criminal justice program. Professor Newman has been a consultant to the United Nations Criminal Justice and Crime Prevention Division. He also helped establish the United Nations Crime and Justice Information Network. This network was the first criminal justice presence on the Internet. Professor Newman is also the Associate Director of the Center for Problem Oriented Policing. This organization focuses on how police can better address crime and disorder problems. As Associate Director, Professor Newman contributes and helps manage the website.

Professor Newman has written several books and you can check them out at the University Libraries and online!

Bomb threats in schools. Graeme Newman. Washington, DC: U.S. Dept. of Justice, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, [2005].
Online / GovDoc: J 85 J 36.15/3:32[http://permanent.access.gpo.gov/lps71547/open.pdf]

Check and card fraud. Graeme Newman. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Dept. of Justice, Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, [2004]
Online / GovDoc: J 85 J 36.15/3:21[http://permanent.access.gpo.gov/lps73068/open.pdf]

Comparative deviance: perception and law in six cultures. Graeme Newman. New York: Elsevier Scientific Pub. Co., c1976.
Dewey Library HV 6030 N48

Crime and deviance: a comparative perspective. Edited by Graeme Newman. Beverly Hills: Sage Publications, c1980.
Dewey Library HV 6028 C72

Crime and immigration. Edited by Joshua D. Freilich and Graeme R. Newman. Aldershot, England; Burlington, VT: Ashgate, c2007.
Dewey Library HV 6181 C714 2007

For a full list of books owned by the University Libraries, search for Professor Newman in Minerva! Search Newman, Graeme under Author (last name first). You will find 26 results.

Professor Newman has also written several articles, reports, and book chapters, including:

Newman, G. and Clarke, R. (2007). “The situational prevention of terrorism: some ethical considerations.� Criminal Justice Ethics, 26(1), 2-65.

“Reducing Opportunities for Terrorism� With Ronald V. Clarke. In Werner Stritzke, Stephen Lewandowsky, David Denemark, Frank Morgan and Joe Clare (Eds) Terrorism and Torture: An Interdisciplinary Perspective. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (2008)
Dewey Library HV 6431 T46357 2009

“Situational Crime Prevention and the Control of Terrorism.� With Ronald V. Clarke. In Ozgur Nikbay and Suneyman Hancerli (Eds.) Understanding and Responding to the Terrorism Phenomenon: A Multidimensional perspective. NATO Science for Peace and Security Series, Vol. 21.Washington: IOC Press. 2007.
Dewey Library HV 6431 N3837 2006

“Modifying Criminogenic Products: What Role for Government?� With Ronald V. Clarke. In Clarke and Newman (Eds) Designing out crime from Products and Systems. Crime Prevention Studies, 2005. London: Willan Publishers. Crime Prevention Studies. Vol. 18. (2005).
Dewey Library HV 7431 D468X 2005

For a full list of Professor Newman’s publications, please consult his CV]. If you have any questions, please contact our criminal justice bibliographer, Mary Jane Brustman by phone at 442-3540 or email at mbrustman@albany.edu.

February 21, 2012

New Resource for Criminal Justice Book Reviews

Criminal Law and Criminal Justice Books (CLCJ) is a new online book review journal put out by Rutgers University. This journal offers access to book reviews of significant books in the criminal justice field. These in-depth reviews are written by top criminal justice scholars. There are also shorter reviews written by graduate students and others with experience in the field. Whether you’re studying criminal justice, thinking about entering the field, or already practicing, CLCJ is a valuable resource.

There are no specific guidelines when it comes to the content of a review, although they prefer to publish reviews on books written in the past two years. If you would like to write a review for CLCJ, please contact the editors. This is a great way to build your curriculum vitae if you are a doctoral student! If you’re interested in receiving updates from CLCJ, you can join their listserv .

If you have any questions about the criminal justice collection at the University Libraries, or need research assistance, please contact our criminal justice bibliographer, Mary Jane Brustman, by phone at 442-3540 or by email at mbrustman@albany.edu.

Blog post created by Kathryn Farrell

December 13, 2011

Criminal Justice Faculty Spotlight: Alissa Pollitz Worden, Associate Professor

Get to know your faculty! This is the first in series of spotlights on the research interests and scholarship of the faculty of the School of Criminal Justice.

Dr. Alissa Pollitz Worden’s research focuses on a variety of topics, including the decision making processes of criminal justice actors, agencies and networks; the determinants of criminal justice policy; the connection between political climate and public policy; and public opinion regarding the causes of domestic violence and how domestic violence incidences should be handled. Her current research projects focus on police officer’s attitudes towards race and gender, theory and its relation to the study of criminal justice, and tracking change in domestic violence enforcement policies. Over time her projects have generated more than a million dollars in grant funding from various institutions, including the New York State Police/COPS, the National Institute of Justice, and the New York Office for the Prevention of Domestic Violence.

Dr. Worden earned a PhD in Political Science from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1987 and taught at the University of Georgia and Michigan State University before coming to UAlbany in 1990.

Dr. Worden has written a number of book chapters that can be found at the Libraries:

Alissa Pollitz Worden and Andrew Davies. 2009. “Protecting Due Process Policies in a Punitive Era: An Analysis of Changes in Providing Counsel to the Poor.� In Austin Sarat, editor, Studies in Law, Politics, and Society: Special Issue - New Perspectives on Crime and Criminal Justice. Volume 47: 71-114. (Dewey HV 7431 N48x 2009).

David E. Duffee, Alissa Pollitz Worden, and Edward Maguire. 2007. “Directions for Theory and Theorizing in Criminal Justice.� In David E. Duffee and Edward Maguire, editors, Criminal Justice Theory. New York: Routledge. (Dewey HV 7419 C753 2007).

Alissa Pollitz Worden. 2007. “Courts and Communities: Toward a Theoretical Synthesis.� In David E. Duffee and Edward Maguire, editors, Criminal Justice Theory. New York: Routledge. (Dewey HV 7419 C753 2007).

Several of her recent journal articles and reports can also be found in the Libraries’ collection:

Andrew Davies and Alissa Pollitz Worden. 2009. "State Politics and the Right to Counsel:
A Comparative Analysis"
. Law & Society Review 43(1). Available through Criminal Justice Abstracts with Full Text.

Bonnie E. Carlson and Alissa Pollitz Worden. 2005. “Attitudes and Beliefs about Domestic Violence: Results of a Public Opinion Survey: Definitions of Domestic Violence, Criminal Domestic Violence, and Prevalence.� Journal of Interpersonal Violence 20(10). Available through SAGE Criminology Full Text Collection.

Alissa Pollitz Worden and Bonnie E. Carlson. 2005. “Attitudes and Beliefs about Domestic Violence: Results of a Public Opinion Survey: Beliefs about Causes.� Journal of Interpersonal Violence 20(10). Available through SAGE Criminology Full Text Collection.

Alissa Pollitz Worden. 2000. “The Changing Boundaries of the Criminal Justice System: Redefining the Problem and the Response in Domestic Violence,� in Charles Friel, editor, Boundary Changes in Criminal Justice Organizations: Volume 2, Criminal Justice 2000. National Institute of Justice. (GovDoc J 85 J 28.2:C 86/22/V.2 and ONLINE [http://permanent.access.gpo.gov/lps5244/Vol.%202/02g2.pdf]).


For assistance researching these and other criminal justice topics, contact subject specialist Mary Jane Brustman at mbrustman@albany.edu or 442-3540 or drop by the Reference Desk.

October 11, 2011

Criminal Justice Issues and the Obama Administration

There are a lot of great resources on the Obama administration and its policy positions regarding criminal justice issues. Much of this criminal justice policy information is readily available online on websites and in journals and newspapers. A number of databases are useful for criminal justice policy research. Together these resources will help you gain a better understanding of how this presidential administration has shaped today’s criminal justice system.

The Department of Justice has a comprehensive website with the latest criminal justice information. The DOJ Criminal Division specifically focuses on federal criminal law in the United States. The division implements several programs to educate the public on issues such as human rights, fraud, and child exploitation. The priorities of the Department of Justice can be seen in their strategic plans and budget documents. One priority of the Obama administration is to fight terrorism. There is information on the web with Department of Justice initiatives on terrorism, and Homeland Security Department initiatives.

Attorney General Eric Holder is both a cabinet member and the highest law enforcement officer of the federal government. His actions and decisions influence the criminal justice system and reflect the Obama administration’s positions on policies. Selected publications of the Attorney General can be accessed online. Also available online are President Obama’s speeches. All of his speeches are displayed--the most recent listed first. This is a great way to stay up-to-date on his administration’s most pressing issues.

The University Libraries have a guide which provides a list of United States Government agencies involved in the criminal justice process. Also, the Justice Policy Institute is a non-profit organization that focuses on justice policies and reform. The website has policy news and updates on its front page—for federal, state and local policy.

The University Libraries have extensive resources on the Obama administration and the criminal justice system. Our databases, Criminal Justice Abstracts with Full Text, Criminal Justice Periodicals Index, PAIS (on public policy generally), and Academic Search Complete, provide access to scholarly articles related to the criminal justice system and the Obama administration. Our online access for the New York Times provides articles and analyses on this subject. (The New York Times is available online at their website , but for fuller coverage see LexisNexis database.)

When searching databases the subject headings criminal justice and criminal justice administration both generate relevant results. Consider narrower terms like drug policy or sentencing and combine them with Obama for more targeted searches. Dick Irving, the Public Affairs subject specialist at Dewey Library, created a nice Guide to Federal Public Policy Research. Here he lists publications like CQ Researcher and National Journal that specialize in policy articles.

Questions? Come to the Dewey Library reference desk or contact our criminal justice librarian, Mary Jane Brustman, by email: mbrustman@albany.edu or call 442-3540.

Blog post created by Katherine Farrell

September 8, 2011

Resarching 9/11 and the War on Terror

The terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 mark one of the most devastating points in our nation’s history. These attacks changed the way we look at the world and ushered in a new age of national security, and high tech warfare. In the aftermath of September 11th the United States went to war against those who perpetrated the attacks, what we now know as The War on Terror. These attacks also spawned literature and discourse on terrorism and armed conflict, along with bringing a better national awareness to the inner workings of government, and in particular the Federal Bureau of Investigations. With the tenth anniversary of September 11th upon us, it is important to stay aware of the resources available to you concerning terrorism, armed conflict, and national security. This post should inform you on these topics and where to find further information for your scholarly research or personal interests.

Here are a few book resources regarding the September 11th attacks, the War on Terror and the FBI.
•The Rhetoric of Terror: Reflections on 9/11 and the War on Terror by Marc Redfield (Dewey Library HV 6432.7 R435 2009)

•Touching History: The Untold Story of the Drama that Unfolded in the Skies Over America on 9/11 by Lynn Spencer
(Dewey Library HV 6432.7 S687 2008)

•Spying Blind: The CIA, The FBI, and the Origins of 9/11 by Amy B. Zegart (University Library JK 468 I6 Z42 2007)

•The FBI: Past, Present, and Future edited by Edward V. Peykar (Dewey Library HV 8144 F43 F29 2005)

The library also subscribes to a few journals related to terrorism that would contain pertinent information on the War on Terror as well as national security and the September 11th attacks. Here are a few of these journals, they can be found by searching the Journals tab in Minerva.
•Journal of National Security Law & Policy [electronic resource]
•Intelligence and National Security [electronic resource]
•Terrorism & Political Violence [electronic resource]
•FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin [print/electronic]

If you are looking for a more broad view of the literature, there are databases you can search that will have information on this topic. Find these by going to the library website and clicking on the Databases tab on the left. Then click the “Criminal Justice��? link in the list, here are a few of the key databases on this topic.

•Criminal Justice Abstracts with Full Text
•Academic Search Complete
•Criminal Justice Periodicals Index

Subject headings are a great way to see all of the items in our collection related to a certain topic. Anytime you find a book or resource you are interested in, make sure to click on the “View Full Record��? link, and you will see subject heading links within the record that will lead you to other items on the same topic. You can search subject headings in Minerva[http://libms1.albany.edu:8991/F/] by selecting the “Subject begins with…��? option on the menu to the left and entering a few terms. Here are a few subject headings to get you started on this topic.

•September 11 --Terrorist Attacks -- 2001
•United States -- Federal Bureau of Investigation
•Terrorism -- Government policy -- United States

Hopefully this has been a helpful walk through on the important resources on this topic. If you need further information or help on this topic make sure to contact our bibliographer for Criminal Justice, Mary Jane Brustman. You can email her at mbrustman@albany.edu or call her at (518) 442-3540. While it can be a very hard subject to research, it is important to be aware of the changes that the September 11th attacks made to our nation and the impact it still has ten years later.


blog post created by Ben Knowles

July 22, 2011

Timely Titles in Criminal Justice Reference

Here at the Dewey Library we try and have the most up to date reference collection for use by the campus community. Every once in a while we try to highlight a few of the newest books in our collection to make sure students, faculty and staff are aware of the fresh material available to them at the library. Criminal justice students may be interested in these new additions to the reference collection. Here are the books, along with their location in the library, and a brief synopsis to make it easier to decide which to use first!

New York Code of Criminal Justice: A Practical Guide by Kenneth Del Vecchio, Heather Byrne, and Mohamed H. Nabulsi. (DEWEY REF KFN 6100 A3 2009)
This publication serves to clarify New York’s criminal statutes, and assist those trying to apply these statutes in the real world. This book is designed to be used by all types of criminal justice practitioners from students all the way up to lawyers and judges. In short it is designed to transform the penal codes to be understandable as well as educational, and hopefully even interesting.

Public Safety and Law Enforcement by A.S. Forbes (DEWEY REF HV9950 F65 2010)
This book is part of the “Filed Guides to Finding a Career� series and is designed to outline various public safety careers. The book is broken down into specific careers and each chapter explains the career and the necessary training as well as expertise necessary to gain employment in the given career. Each chapter follows this same format and employs helpful diagrams and pictures to make sure the career is explained thoroughly.

Prentice Hall's Dictionary of American Criminal Justice, Criminology, and Criminal Law by David N. Falcone (DEWEY REF KF 9223 A68 F35 2010)
This dictionary was created to encompass all relevant words and phrases related to the study of criminal justice. Though the dictionary was designed for criminal justice students specifically, it is also accessible enough for practitioners as well as lay persons. The reference book also contains a list of major criminal appellate cases as well as brief biographical segments about the U.S. Supreme Court Justices.

Encyclopedia of Victimology and Crime Prevention edited by Bonnie S. Fisher and Steven P. Lab (DEWEY REF HV 6250.3 U5 E55 2010 V. 1 and V. 2)
This encyclopedia is dedicated to the study of victimology and crime prevention specifically in how these two relate to criminal law. The encyclopedia offers a Reader’s Guide to help navigate the numerous heading and subjects contained within the two volumes of this work. Entries are broken up in to anchor essays and headword entries, the essays drawing out a topic with the headword entries condensing much of the information known about a specific topic.

These four books represent some of the newest items we own at the Dewey Library in the area of Criminal Justice. They are certainly not all of the new materials, but they give a broad look at some key areas in the field as a whole. If you have any other questions about new materials or simply want a recommendation for further reading make sure to contact the Criminal Justice Bibliographer, Mary Jane Brustman. Her office is located on the Uptown Campus, her email address is mbrustman@uamail.albany.edu and her phone number is (518) 442-3540, do not hesitate to contact her with any questions or comments.


Blog post created by Benjamin Knowles

June 6, 2011

Criminal Justice Students: Wondering What to Read this Summer?

We consulted some UAlbany criminal justice faculty and here’s what they suggest:

Frankie Bailey recommends reading Crime, Punishment, and Mental Illness. (Erickson, Patricia E. and Steven K. Erickson, Rutgers University Press, 2008). She says that reading this and watching the Frontline documentary, “The New Asylums,� is an especially thought-provoking experience. Book at Dewey Library RA 1151 E72 2008. Video available free on YouTube.com. (Just search YouTube by title. The video is split into 5 segments.)

Jamie Fader recommends Robert Garot’s new book, Who You Claim: Performing Gang Identity in School and on the Streets (New York University Press, 2010). Find it at Dewey Library HV 6439 U5 G384 2010

David McDowell recommends A History of Murder: Personal Violence in Europe from the Middle Ages to the Present, by Pieter Spierenburg. (Polity Press, 2008.) Due to arrive at Dewey Library on approximately June 3.

Also, check out these new 2011 books at Dewey Library:

David Garland, Randall McGowen and Michael Meranza. America’s death penalty: between past and present. Subject of a recent, interesting on-campus presentation by David Garland and a panel of UAlbany criminal justice faculty. Dewey Library HV8699.U5 A745 2011 (New Books shelf)

Jay Albanese. Transnational Crime and the 21st century. Dewey Library HV 6252 A43 2011 (New Books shelf)

Sheldon Krimsky and Tania Simoncelli. Genetic justice: DNA data banks, criminal investigations and civil liberties. Dewey Library HV 8073 K668 2011

Jerome Miller. Search and destroy: African-American males in the criminal justice system. Dewey Library HV 9950 M55 2011

John Sloan and Bonnie Fisher. The dark side of the ivory tower: campus crime as a social problem. Dewey Library HV 6250.4 S78 S55 2011 (New Books shelf)

James Q. Wilson and Joan Petersilia. Crime and public policy. Dewey Library HV 9950 C743156X 2011 (on New Books shelf)

Heather Hamill. The hoods: crime and punishment in Belfast. Dewey Library HV 6949 N67 H36 2011 (New Books shelf)

and many more….. Check out our New Books shelf or search Minerva, our online catalog (hint: use Advanced Search and limit by date for recent books.)

Blog post created by Mary Jane Brustman

April 12, 2011

New and Improved: Criminal Justice Abstracts with Full Text

Attention Criminal Justice students! There is a brand new database available to you through the University Libraries website. It is called Criminal Justice Abstracts with Full Text; it is powered by the popular EBSCO family of databases. Ebsco has purchased the Criminal Justice Abstracts database, formerly hosted by SAGE, and added full text capabilities. This improved database has many more features than its predecessor and now you have the unique opportunity to use this website for all of your future research and assignments.

One of the most impressive aspects of this database is the wide variety of topics within Criminal Justice that it covers; here are some of those topics:
• Criminology
• Criminal Justice
• Corrections and Prisons
• Criminal Investigation
• Forensic Sciences & Investigation
• Substance Abuse & Addiction
• Probation & Parole

The database houses over 300,000 records from all of these categories along with bibliographic records and of course full text. There are over 500 titles with cover to cover full text, allowing for easy access and searching. This new database even allows for searchable references. The database also contains resources from countries all over the world to highlight the globalization of Criminal Justice and the ground breaking research being done all over the world. The database includes records that are compiled from over 200 publications. Of these 200 publications there are over 180 peer reviewed journals included within the database. The database even houses full text books and monographs!

One of the best parts of this database is that it is run by EBSCO, one of the most comprehensive and well known publishers in the world of academic research. Many of you are probably familiar with the EBSCO interface so searching within this new database should take little to no adjustment on your part. You will find all of the same features you are used to with other EBSCO databases. There is still the same search options that allow you to assign a field to each search term as well as link search terms with the Boolean operators AND, OR, as well as NOT. The interface allows you to limit your search to full text as well as limit it to publication type and whether it is peer reviewed or not.

With all of the new features of this database along with the user friendly EBSCO interface you should have no problem using this database to its fullest potential. It will be a huge help to you as you research and compile information for papers and assignment, so get out there and check it out, you will not be disappointed!

If you have questions about criminal justice research, please contact Mary Jane Brustman, our criminal justice bibliographer. She can be reached at 442-3540 or by email at mbrustman@uamail.albany.edu.

blog post created by Benjamin Knowles

March 1, 2011

Obama, what have you done for me lately? Researching Current Criminal Justice issues

Books are wonderful resources, but when researching current events periodicals like journals and newspapers are often going to be your best bet. Picking up journals and newspapers at random usually isn’t a very efficient way of researching a specific topic, so let’s look at some UAlbany databases that would be helpful. As an example, we’ll try to find out what major laws, bills, and initiatives Obama has undertaken that affect the criminal justice field.

Start by visiting the UA Libraries website, then click Research by Subject from the left. For this topic, both the Criminal Justice and Public Administration and Policy pages might be useful. You can select the link under Databases / Electronic Resources in either of these categories to view the relevant resources, but we’ll go ahead and use the one located on the Criminal Justice page.

LexisNexis Academic and Westlaw Campus are both great resources for viewing legal and newspaper documents. For this topic, the “Search the News� and “Look Up a Legal Case� sections of LexisNexis are going to be the most useful. I started by doing a search for “Obama and criminal justice� in the Search the News box. That’s a pretty general search, so I retrieved a very large number of results. To narrow down my search I clicked on the Subject link at the left. I could use this to get a more specific focus for my research (like “torture,� which had only 23 results, or “criminal law,� which had 258). At the top of the results, I can also choose to sort by relevance or by date; once we’ve narrowed down our search, sorting by date will help us start with the most recent news first.

Let’s check out Westlaw Campus next. You can click on either tab at the very top of the page – “News & Business� or “Law� – to decide whether you want to look for legal cases and proceedings or news periodicals. I repeated my search by typing “Obama� in the first box, and then typing “criminal justice� into the second box. If you click the drop-down button next to the second search box, you will see options for AND and OR – these are called operators, and help you narrow (AND) or broaden (OR) your search. We’re using the AND operator to include both “Obama� and “criminal justice� in our searches, just like we did in LexisNexis, but this time we’re using two search boxes and the operator AND is being provided for us. Under categories, I would also recommend clicking the box by Legal & Justice to narrow the search on this first page.

Try these searches for yourself. What options do you see in each database to narrow down your topic? Do you find one database easier to use than the other?

If you have questions about these or any other databases, please stop by the reference desk. For special assistance with your criminal justice topic, you can make an appointment with the Criminal Justice Bibliographer, Mary Jane Brustman, by emailing her at mbrustman@uamail.albany.edu or calling (518) 442-3540.

Blog post created by Lauren Stern

February 1, 2011

Terrorism: New Additions to the Dewey Collection

The color-coded terrorist threat warning system implemented during the Bush administration will soon become extinct, but unfortunately it’s not because terrorism has followed the path of the dinosaurs. Terrorism continues to be a concern for many in the US, including UAlbany students.

A wide variety of recent criminal justice and political science books are available at the UA Libraries, including a 2010 publication by faculty member David Bayley, The Police in War: Fighting Insurgency, Terrorism, and Violent Crime . Professor Bayley’s book examines terrorism from a criminal justice perspective, examining the role of police and police training in Iraq, Afghanistan, Somalia, Haiti, and other countries.

From a theoretical discussion of imagery that compares terrorism with cloning (Cloning Terror: The War of Images, 9/11 to the Present by W. J. T. Mitchell to an examination of the ethics of governmental response to terrorism (Because it is Wrong: Torture, Privacy and Presidential Power in the Age of Terror by Charles and Gregory Fried to a case study about a 1997 NYPD raid that prevented a potentially catastrophic suicide bombing (Seven Shots: An NYPD Raid on a Terrorist Cell and its Aftermath by Jennifer C. Hunt )you’ll find a wide variety of resources to help you dig a little deeper into the criminal, political, ethical, and theoretical issues surrounding terrorist actions and government reactions.

To view all of the books on terrorism available at Dewey that have been published since 2009, you can visit this list of terrorism materials created on January 30th using the Minerva catalog.

If you are interested in researching the various aspects and implications of terrorism, you may wish to make an appointment with our Criminal Justice Bibliographer, Mary Jane Brustman. You can call her at 442-3540 or email her at mbrustman@uamail.albany.edu.

Blog post created by Lauren Stern

November 23, 2010

Excellence in Criminal Justice Research

Looking for a selection of the best writing in criminal justice? Take a look at the American Society of Criminology (ASC) and Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences (ACJS) book award winners.

The ASC award is named for Michael J. Hindelang, late professor from our School of Criminal Justice and one of the founders of the Michael J. Hidelang Criminal Justice Research Center located in Draper Hall here on the Downtown Campus. The Michael J. Hindelang Award is given for a book which makes an "outstanding contribution to research in criminology." The book must be written by an ASC member and published no more than three years ago. The University Libraries own all of the award winning books, and most of them are located here at Dewey (check the library catalog, Minerva, for more information).

Two of the award winning works were written by researchers associated with the University at Albany:

Maruna, Shadd . (2001) Making good : how ex-convicts reform and rebuild their lives. Washington DC: American Psychological Association. Dewey Library / HV 9276 M37X 2001

Thornberry, Terrence P., Krohn, Marvin D., Lizotte, Alan J., Smith, Carolyn A., Tobin, Kimberly . (2003). Gangs and delinquency in developmental perspective. NY:Cambridge University Press. Dewey Library / HV 6439 U52 N74 2003

The Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences likewise offers an Outstanding Book Award each year. The 1992-2009 winners are all owned by the University Libraries, and again, most of them are located here at Dewey (check Minerva for details)

You may also be interested to learn that both ASC and ACJS also give awards for other categories, such as best article and best student paper. You may wish to look at the ASC awards page or the ACJS awards page for more information.

If you are looking to locate the highest quality of Criminal Justice research possible, you may wish to contact Mary Jane Brustman, who is our library subject specialist for criminal justice. Contact Mary Jane by email (mbrustman@uamail.albany.edu) or phone (442-3540).

Blog post created by Mary Jane Brustman and Elaine Bergman

October 26, 2010

Researching Police and Law Enforcement Administration

Criminal justice research can be overwhelming due to the abundance of available resources. It can also be difficult to assess the best resources for your information needs. The purpose of this blog is to assist in selecting the best resources for Police and Law Enforcement Administration.

A great place to start your research, especially for background information on your topic, is with reference materials. While they probably won’t be prominent resources cited in your paper, reference materials, such as subject encyclopedias and dictionaries, can be extremely helpful in providing foundation information on a given topic. The following are just a sampling of the reference materials available that cover our topic.

Newton, Michael. The encyclopedia of American law enforcement. New York: Facts On File, 2007. Dewey Library / Reference HV 8133 N492X 2007

Greene, Jack R. The encyclopedia of police science. New York: Routledge, 2007. Dewey Library / Reference HV 7901 E53 2007

Wakefield, Alison & Fleming, Jenny. The Sage dictionary of policing. London: SAGE, 2009. Dewey Library / Reference HV 7901 S34X 2009

Similar to reference materials, websites can be a great source of background information on a given topic. There are several quality websites that focus on police and law enforcement administration. POLICE Magazine provides police news, safety tips, and an interactive online community. Another potential source of information is a series of podcasts posted to the site which feature conversations with people in the law enforcement field.

If your research is focused on New York State, the New York State Division of State Police is a useful resource. This site provides crime prevention and safety publications that can be downloaded and viewed for free.

For more websites, check out the library's Criminal Justice Research Guide .

Once you have a firm grasp on your research topic, a search for books in the Minerva Catalog will likely be your next source of information. While you can search the catalog using general keyword search terms and likely find some success, a better search strategy would be to search using various subject headings. Every book in the catalog is tagged with one or more subject headings. If you can find the subject heading that best categorizes your research topic, the quality of the search results will be far greater as opposed to using a general keyword search. Try using the following subject headings in Minerva:

Police administration
Law enforcement
United States. Law Enforcement Assistance Administration
Criminal justice, Administration of

If it is articles that you are after, then you will want to begin your search in the Criminal Justice Periodicals Index . You can get to this database by searching for it by title in the search box on the Databases and Indexes] page, then clicking on its title. CJPI is a subject specific database, meaning that is only indexes journals that pertain to the study of criminal justice. A majority of the articles indexed in CJPI range from 1981 to present, with a few articles included that date as far back as the 1970s. Roughly one third of the journals indexed in CJPI are available full text, ranging from 1988 to present. CJPI is constantly updated on a weekly basis, so you know that you are searching the most recent and up-to-date criminal justice scholarship. For detailed information and a walkthrough on how best to search the CJPI database, please visit the Guide to Criminal Justice Periodicals Index.

For topics related to police and law enforcement, your second choice database will be Criminal Justice Abstracts . Criminal Justice Abstracts is the most comprehensive database for criminal justice and criminology generally.

NCJRS Abstracts Database (CSA version), your third choice, has many state and local studies on law enforcement. (After you graduate you may want to use the free government version of this database.)

If you have any questions or need help with research on a criminal justice topic, please contact Mary Jane Brustman, who is our bibliographer for criminal justice. She can be reached by sending an email to mbrustman@uamail.albany.edu or by calling 442-3540.

Blog post created by Katie Farrell

September 7, 2010

Beginning Criminal Justice Research

If you are a new Criminal Justice student, or a returning student who needs a refresher on criminal justice research, here are a few tips for getting started.

The University at Albany Libraries have extensive collections of criminal justice books, journals, reports and databases, and it can be challenging to know exactly where to start the research process. We’ve created a research guide for just this purpose. To find it, go to the Research by Subject tab on the left side of the University Libraries’ main web page, and select Criminal Justice. Here are some of the features of the Criminal Justice Research guide:

  1. Databases / Electronic Resources
    • Connect to Databases for Criminal Justice -- When you want to do a keyword or subject search to find journal articles and reports, these are your best resource.
    • Database Descriptions -- If you’re not sure which of our many databases is the best one for your topic, this section provides more in depth descriptions of useful databases for criminal justice.

  2. Research Guides
    • Criminal Justice; Finding Information -- This is a general guide to information for criminal justice, with tips on how to start your research – basic reference sources are included for a variety of subtopics.
    • Criminal Justice Statistics -- This guide specifically focuses on finding statistical materials, and includes UAlbany’s own Sourcebook of Criminal Justice Statistics.
    • Topics in Criminal Justice -- Finding reliable information on the web can be trickier than it seems. This page provides vetted, authoritative Internet resources on various criminal justice topics.

  3. Collections at the University at Albany
    • About the Criminal Justice Collection -- This section gives an overview of what types of materials we purchase for the collection here at UAlbany.
    • Special Collection: Criminal Justice & Prisons -- Get some basic information on our archival material about organizations and people key to criminal justice history and policy.
    • Special Collection: National Death Penalty Archive – Get some basic information on ournationally recognized archive of primary source materials on the death penalty.

  4. Other Useful Resources
    • Dewey Blog Entries for Criminal Justice – Then Dewey Library blog provides regular updates on various topics of interest to Dewey Library patrons and the Downtown Campus community. This link provides just the blog entries on our resources for criminal justice, including many pointers for doing criminal justice research.

    Be sure to check out the Criminal Justice Research Tutorial to test your knowledge on Criminal Justice research.

    For help and additional information, contact the Criminal Justice Bibliographer Mary Jane Brustman at 442-3540 or email her at mbrustman@uamail.albany.edu.

August 16, 2010

Summer Reading List: Crime Fiction

Summer time is a good to take a break from the pages and pages of academic materials we read all year long. Crime Fiction is one of the most popular genres of fiction today. From Victorian novels to graphic novels, crime fiction appeals to many different audiences. Crimeculture provides information on many different crime fiction novels as well as publishes articles on the crime fiction genre. This is a great website for those just beginning to experience crime fiction novels or long-time fans. If you want to learn more about crime fiction authors and characters MysteryNet.com is a place where you can learn about authors such as Agatha Christie and Edgar Allen Poe and characters like Sherlock Holmes and Nancy Drew. There is also a section on TV and movies such as Law & Order.

When UAlbany professor Frankie Bailey isn’t teaching classes in criminal justice she is writing crime fiction. Some of her books include:

You Should Have Died on Monday, a story about Lizzie Stewart searching for information on her mother’s past.

A Dead Man’s Honor, another Lizzie Stewart story but this time she visits the town where a city physician was murdered years before. Check this book out at the University Library / PS 3552 A375X D434 2001

Death’s Favorite Child , in this book Lizzie Stewart visits Cornwall where someone dies and a mystery ensues. Check this book out at the University Library / PS 3552 A375X D43 2000

Other books by Frankie Bailey at the University Libraries are:

Out of the woodpile : black characters in crime and detective fiction. University Library / PS 374 D4 B34 1991

Popular culture, crime, and justice. University Library / HV 6789 B25 1998
Old Murders. University Library / PS 3552 A368 O54X 2003

Books about crime fiction at the University Libraries include:

Knight, Stephen. Crime fiction since 1800: detection, death, diversity. Basingstoke [England] ; New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2010. University Library / PR 830 D4 K59X 2010

Anderson, Patrick. The triumph of the thriller : how cops, crooks, and cannibals captured popular fiction. New York : Random House, c2007. University Library / PS 374 D4 A56 2007

Carrabine, Eamonn. Crime, culture and the media. Cambridge, UK ; Malden, MA : Polity, 2008. Dewey Library / P 96 C74 C37X 2008

If you have any other questions about crime fiction and the media, please contact our criminal justice librarian, Mary Jane Brustman, at mbrustman@uamail.albany.edu or 442-3540.

Blog post created by Katie Farrell

July 5, 2010

What's In Special Collections? Criminal Justice

There are many useful archival collections in our Special Collections department that may be of interest to researchers on the downtown campus. The National Death Penalty Archive is one of several collections that Criminal Justice researchers may find useful.

The National Death Penalty Archive (NDPA) is a partnership between the University at Albany Libraries and the University's School of Criminal Justice to establish and maintain a collection of archival materials documenting the important history of capital punishment, and to provide resources for historical scholarship. In 2000, The M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections & Archives began acquiring the records that document the history and historical debate over capital punishment including the records from National Coalition to Abolish the Death Penalty, the Hugo Bedau Papers, and the Execution Files of M. Watt Espy. Nore listings and descriptions are available on the Special Collections website.

Here are some examples of items from the National Death Penalty Archive:

For more information about the resources in Special Collections and Archives, contact Brian Keough at bkeough@uamail.albany.edu or 437-3931.

Blog post and images courtesy of Brian Keough and Special Collections

June 16, 2010

Job Searching: Criminal Justice

If you a Criminal Justice student who is interested in learning more about what you can do with your degree, look no further. With a degree in criminal justice you can work in a number of different occupations. Some occupations require additional studying. A few are as follows:


  • Law Enforcement Administration

  • Correctional Administration

  • Research and Teaching

  • Lawyer

  • Paralegal

  • Corrections Officer

  • Judge

  • Police, Detective, FBI, DEA, U.S. Marshal, INS, Customs Inspector

  • Private Detective, Investigator

  • Probation Officer

  • Court Reporter

Professional associations are very good places to look for information about different careers. There are many different associations for the various criminal justice careers. There is a comprehensive list of criminal justice associations on the library’s Criminal Justice research guide.

Both the University Library and Dewey Library have a number of excellent reference books that might provide you with some helpful career guidance:

Criminal Justice and Criminology : a career guide to local, state, federal and academic positions by James F. Anderson, Nancie Jean Mangels, and Laronistine Dyson – Dewey Library / HV 9950 A54X 2003

Federal Law Enforcement Careers : profiles of 250 high-powered positions and tactics for getting hired by Thomas H. Ackerman – University Library / Reference: HF 5381 A3544X 2006

FBI Careers : the ultimate guide to landing a job as one of America’s finest by Thomas H. Ackerman – University Library / Reference: HF 5381 A354X 2006

Opportunities in Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice Careers by James Stinchcomb – University Library / Reference: HF 5381 S86X 2003

Great Jobs for Criminal Justice Majors by Stephen Lambert and Debra Regan – University Library / Reference: HF 5381 L2537X 2001

Career Opportunities in Forensic Science by Susan Echaore-McDavid and Richard A. McDavid – University Library / Reference: HF 5381 E62X 2008

For more information about Criminal Justice careers, see the School of Criminal Justice’s Careers in Criminal Justice web page. When you are ready to begin searching for a job in a particular field,don't forget to look at their job search strategies.

If you have any questions about researching Criminal Justice careers, you can also contact Mary Jane Brustman, our subject specialist for Criminal Justice. Feel free to contact her at mbrustman@uamail.albany.edu, or by phone at 442-3540.

May 12, 2010

Quality Resources for Correctional or Prison Administration Research

When conducting scholarly research, knowing which resources to utilize is oftentimes the biggest hurdle to writing a quality research paper. Many subject areas, including Criminal Justice, have such a depth and breadth of resources to search through that it can seem daunting to pick out the ones that are best suited for your information need. The purpose of this blog is to help demystify the resource selection process for Criminal Justice research in general, and more specifically for Correctional or Prison Administration research. Hopefully, by the end of this blog, you too will be able to pick out the best resources to use while you conduct your research.

A great place to start your research, especially for background information on your topic, is with reference materials. While they probably won’t be prominent resources cited in your paper, reference materials such as subject encyclopedias and dictionaries can be extremely helpful in providing foundation information on a given topic. The following are just a sampling of the reference materials available that cover our topic.

Bosworth, Mary.Encyclopedia of Prisons & Correctional Facilities. Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Sage Publications, 2005.
Dewey Library / Reference HV 9471 B675 2005


Levinson, David. Encyclopedia of Crime and Punishment. Thousand Oaks, Ca.: Sage Publications, 2002.
Dewey Library / Reference HV 6017 E524 2002

Sifakis, Carl. The Encyclopedia of American Prisons. New York: Facts on File, 2003.
Dewey Library / Oversized HV 9471 S54 2003

Similar to reference materials, websites can be a great source of background information on a given topic. There are several quality websites that focus on corrections and administration. One such site is the Corrections Connections Network . In addition to offering current news articles from across the nation, this site also has a searchable archive all the news articles that have been featured on the site from 2000 to present. They also have the past three years of their online magazine, Corrections Connection, readily available to read. Another potential source of information is a series of podcasts posted to the site. Each show features an interview with a prominent member in the field of criminal justice on a unique topic. One of their recent shows featured an interview with Dr. William Sondervan, Chair of the Department of Criminal Justice and Associate Professor Ben Stevenson, both of the University of Maryland-University College. They discussed how correctional administrators are dealing with the considerable budget cuts that occur in most correctional systems around the country.

If your research is focused on New York State, the New York State Department of Correctional Services should be the first resource consulted. The Department of Correctional Services produces many research reports concerning the inmate population and other aspects of the operations of the Department. These research reports and publications are all available, full-text, through their Research Reports and Publications) Annotated Listing.

They also have the DOCS Newsroom, which is a collection of official press releases issued by DOCS, Fact Sheets that offer summary of key points on timely topics, News Links that contain news and press releases related to DOCS, and DOCS/TODAY, which is their quarterly newsletter.

Once you have a firm grasp on your research topic, a search of the Minerva Catalog will likely be your next source of information. While you can search the catalog using general keyword search terms and likely find some success, a better search strategy would be to search using various subject headings. Every book in the catalog is grouped together via a subject heading. If you can find the subject heading that best categorizes your research topic, the quality of the search results will be far greater as opposed to using a general keyword search. Try using the following subject headings in Minerva:

Prison Administration – United States
Correctional Institutions – United States – Administration
Jails – United States – Administration
Prisons – United States – Officials and Employees
Correctional Personnel – United States
Jails – United States – Management
Corrections – United States – Administration
Correctional Institutions – Personnel Management – United States

If it is articles that you are after, then you will definitely want to conduct your search in the Criminal Justice Periodicals Index database. You can get to this database by searching for it by title in the search box on the Databases and Indexes page, then clicking on its title. CJPI is a subject specific database, meaning that is only indexes journals that pertain to the study of criminal justice. Corrections is one of the several areas of specialization that CJPI focuses on, which makes it a great database to search for articles on correctional and prison administration. A majority of the articles indexed in CJPI range from 1981 to present, with a few articles included that date as far back as the 1970’s. Roughly one third of the journals indexed in CJPI are available full text, ranging from 1988 to present. CJPI is constantly updated on a weekly basis, so you know that you are searching the most recent and up-to-date criminal justice scholarship. For detailed information and a walkthrough on how best to search the CJPI database, please visit the Guide to Criminal Justice Periodicals Index.

For a comprehensive search, please note that we have two other major criminal justice databases, Criminal Justice Abstracts and NCJRS Abstracts Database (both a web version and an easier interface from CSA

If you have any questions or need help with research on a criminal justice topic, please contact Mary Jane Brustman, who is our Bibliographer for Criminal Justice. She can be reached by sending an email to mbrustman@uamail.albany.edu or by calling 442-3540.

Blog post created by Matthew Laudicina

March 23, 2010

School of Criminal Justice Appoints New Dean

As you may or may not be aware, President George M. Phillip recently announced the appointment of Dr. Alan J. Lizotte as the new Dean of UAlbany’s School of Criminal Justice. Dr. Lizotte has served as the interim dean of the School since last July. Additionally, Dr. Lizotte has been the executive director of the School’s Hindelang Criminal Justice Research Center since 2003, and has been a member of the Center’s board since 1986.

Dr. Lizotte is a nationally recognized leading authority on gun use and violence, criminology, and juvenile delinquency. His areas of specialization focus on Statistics and Quantitative Research Methods, Patterns of Firearms Ownership and Use, Juvenile Delinquency, and Victimization. He received his master's degree and Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Illinois and his bachelor's in sociology from Brown University.

As a founding member and co-principal investigator of the Rochester Youth Development Study, Dr. Lizotte’s work produced over $25 million in grants over the past twenty years. In 2003 he received the American Society of Criminology's Michael J. Hindelang Award for the Most Outstanding Contribution to Research in Criminology, and in 2009, received UAlbany's President's Award for Excellence in Research and UAlbany's Graduate Student Association's Faculty Award for Excellence in Graduate Student Development.

Dr. Lizotte served from 2004 to 2007 as an executive counselor of the American Society of Criminology. Locally, he is currently a member of the City of Albany's selection committee, and is involved in its search for a new chief of police.

Dr. Lizotte has written several books and numerous journal articles and book chapters throughout his illustrious career, many of which are owned by the UA Libraries:

Lizotte, Alan J, et al. Gangs and Delinquency in Developmental Perspective. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003
Dewey Library / HV 6439 U52 N74 2003

Krohn, Marvin D., Alan J. Lizotte, and Gina Penly. Hall. Handbook on Crime and Deviance. Dordrecht: Springer, 2009
Dewey Library / HV 6025 H278X 2009

Lizotte, Alan J., Trudy L. Bonsell, David McDowall, Marvin D. Krohn, and Terence P. Thornberry. “Carrying guns and involvement in crime.� In Crime and Justice at the Millennium: Essays by and in Honor of Marvin E. Wolfgang. Robert A. Silverman, Terence P. Thornberry, Bernard Cohen, and Barry Krisberg (eds.), Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers, pp. 145-158.
Dewey Library / HV 6025 C69 2002

McCluskey, Cynthia Perez, Marvin D. Krohn, Alan J. Lizotte and Monica L. Rodriguez. “Early substance use and school achievement: An examination of Latino, White, and African American Youth.� Journal of Drug Issues, Vol. 32, pp. 921-944. Full-Text available through the Academic Search Complete database.

Beth Bjerregaard and Alan J. Lizotte. "Gun ownership and gang membership." Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology, Vol. 86, No. 1, (Fall), pp. 37-58. Full-Text available through the Academic Search Complete database.

Alan J. Lizotte, Marvin D. Krohn, James C. Howell, Kimberly Tobin, and Gregory J. Howard. “Factors influencing gun carrying among urban males over the adolescent-young adult life course.� Criminology, Vol. 38, No. 3, August, pp. 811-834. Full-Text available through the ProQuest Criminal Justice Periodicals Index database.

If you would like more information about Dr. Alan J. Lizotte and his appointment as the new Dean of the School of Criminal Justice, you can visit the homepage for the School of Criminal Justice, the Official News Release announcing his appointment, and the Alan Lizotte Profile within the website for the School of Criminal Justice.

Blog post created by Matthew Laudicina

February 16, 2010

Resources for New York State Criminal Justice Statistics

Having trouble finding quality resources for New York State Criminal Justice statistics? Not anymore you’re not! There are a multitude of resources, available online, that are both reputable and comprehensive in compiling and reporting statistical information for Criminal Justice. The following are just a handful of the many resources currently available.

The New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services contains a wealth of statistics pertinent to the study of Criminal Justice. The department is authorized to gather crime and criminal justice processing data from law enforcement, prosecution, courts, and corrections agencies throughout New York State. Included on the site are numerous charts, tables, and indexes of statistics covering a broad range of topics. Among the many charts and tables offered by the NYS DCJS is a table of Law Enforcement Personne organized by county. There is also an index of violent and property crimes reported to law enforcement, which can be viewed by Region, County Totals, or by Agency. Additionally, there is a chart of Crime Rates and Counts by County, a table of Hate Crime Incidents by reporting agency over the last five years, and a series of tables of Juvenile Arrests / Criminal Activity.

In addition to the New York State Division of Criminal Justice Services, there are also national resources that incorporate statistics at the state level. First there is the Sourcebook of Criminal Justice Statistics, which brings together data from more than 100 sources about many aspects of criminal justice in the United States. Another great resource is Crime in the United States, which is published by the Federal Bureau of Investigation Uniform Crime Reports. This is an annual publication in which the FBI compiles volume and rate of criminal offenses for the nation, the states, and individual agencies. Lastly, we have the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data . According to their website, the NACJD provides users with criminological and criminal justice data collections on specific topics, custom subsetting of selected data files through their online Survey Documentation and Analysis, and assistance with the retrieval and use of files obtained from the archive.

If you have any questions or need help finding Criminal Justice statistics, please contact our Bibliographer for Criminal Justice, Mary Jane Brustman. You can contact her by email at mbrustman@uamail.albany.edu, or by phone at 442-3540.

Blog post created by Matthew Laudicina

December 8, 2009

Research on the New York State Court System

Research Problem: How do you begin to find quality, relevant information on New York State courts?

The New York State Unified Court System is an intricate network of courts. The Court system's website does a great job of illustrating the relationships between the courts – from the lowest courts, all the way up to the New York State Court of Appeals. Many different types of courts are described here – Supreme Courts and County Courts where felonies are heard, New York City Criminal Courts, Family Couts, Appellate Divisions, various problem-solving courts, etc. Researching such a complex system, or even part of it, can seem like a daunting task. Here are some tips to get you started.

For example, suppose you are interested in one of the problem solving jurisdictions such as the, Domestic Violence (IDV) Courts:

These courts are dedicated to cases that involve criminal, family, and matrimonial disputes where the primary issue is domestic violence. The IDV Courts are unique in that they adhere to the “one family – one judge� model. This particular model attaches a single judge to a single family dealing with domestic violence. By connecting one judge with a single family, the goal of the IDV Courts is to provide more informed judicial decision-making and greater consistency in court orders, while at the same time reducing the number of court appearances for families. This system also enables the IDV Courts to provide enhanced services to victims and helps to ensure offender accountability.

Another example of problem-solving courts in the NYS Unified Court Systems are the Drug Treatment Courts:

These courts are proactive in their involvement with individuals that find themselves in the Drug Treatment Court System, specifically with the cooperation of an entire team including the prosecution, defense, education, treatment, and law enforcement. Suitable non-violent addicted offenders are given the option of entering voluntarily into court-supervised treatment in return for the promise of a reduced sentence. The defendant, defense attorney, district attorney, and the court all enter into a contract that specifically details the rules and conditions of the defendant’s participation into the program.

How do you find articles and books?

Beyond the basic information provided on the courts website, you will want to seek out relevant articles and books. As with other subject areas, database searching is key to finding quality research and policy resources (particularly articles) on the New York State Court System. When looking for information on the New York State Court System, be sure to search in the following databases:

  • Academic Search Complete

  • Westlaw Campus

  • PAIS International / PAIS Archive

  • Index to Legal Periodicals and Books

  • LexisNexis Academic
  • To access these databases, go to Databases and Indexes on the library home page and click on the first letter of the name of the database.

    In addition to the database resources, there are books located at Dewey Library that can provide information on the New York State Court of Appeals. (From the Libraries webpage (), select Minerva. The following are just a small sample of what is available:

    Donnino, William C. New York Court of Appeals on criminal law. New York: West Group. 1997. Dewey Library / Law KFN 6100 D66 1997

    Karger, Arthur. Powers of the New York Court of Appeals. Rochester, N.Y: Lawyers Cooperative Publication, 1997. Dewey Library / KFN 5960 C63 1997

    Meyer, Bernard S., Burton C. Agata and Seth H. Agata. History of the New York Court of Appeals, 1932-2003. New York: Columbia University Press, 2006. Dewey Library / KFN 5960 B47 2006

    Or on a particular topic, such as sentencing:

    Brennan, Pauline K. Women sentenced to jail in New York City. New York: LFB Scholarly Publishing, 2002. Dewey Library/ KFN 6172 B74 2002.

    For detailed information on how to select and use databases to find articles, books, and reports, consult our Criminal Justice Research Tutorial. And feel free to contact Criminal Justice Bibliographer Mary Jane Brustman by email at mbrustman@uamail.albany.edu or by calling 442-3540.

    Blog post created by Matthew Laudicina

November 10, 2009

Need Help Finding Book Reviews on Criminal Justice Topics?

Locating book reviews from any field of study can prove to be a challenge. Finding reviews of books written on a Criminal Justice topic are no exception. Equipped with the proper information, the process of finding and acquiring reviews of books written on Criminal Justice can become a manageable task.

The first step in the process is to identify the author, title, and date of publication for the book being reviewed. If any of this information first try Minerva, our online catalog. If it's not included in our catalgo, your best bet would be to search the If any of this information is missing, your best bet would be to search the WorldCat database with the information you already have to locate the necessary information.

Once you have identified the book whose reviews you are interested, you will need to know the proper databases to search for reviews.

Book Review Digest Retrospective, which covers 1905-1982, and Book Review Digest Plus, which covers 1983-Present.

Criminal Justice Abstracts covers 1968 - present and has a limited selection of criminal justice book reviews.

Sociological Abstracts covers 1952 - present indexes reviews for sociology, criminal jusice and other subjects.

Important: Be sure to select a database that provides coverage when the book and the subsequent book reviews were published. If the full text of the reviews are not available directly through the database, print out or copy the complete citation of each review, including the journal title, volume number, and page numbers.

Once you have the citation information for the desired reviews, search the journal title in the Journal Finder, to determine if it is owned by the University Libraries (go to the libraries' main website and click "Journal Finder" on the left) . If you discover that the University Libraries do not own the review source, take a moment to fill out an Interlibrary Loan request. Within a short period of time, usually a week or less, the full text of the review will be sent to your email account.

Criminal Justice journals subscribed to by Dewey Library that feature book reviews include:
Criminal Law Bulletin: Dewey Library / Periodicals K 3 R5
Criminal Justice Ethics: Dewey Library / Periodicals HV 7231 C75
Justice Quarterly: Dewey Library / Periodicals HV 7231 J88X

For more information or assistance in finding book reviews for Criminal Justice topics, please contact our Bibliographer for Criminal Justice, Mary Jane Brustman. She can be reached by email at mbrustman@uamail.albany.edu or by calling 442-3517.

Blog post created by Matthew Laudicina

October 27, 2009

Hindelang Research Center

Nationally recognized – and fascinating-- research in criminal justice takes place in…..DRAPER HALL!! The School of Criminal Justice is home to the Hindelang Criminal Justice Research Center. The center was founded in 1972 by Professor Michael Hindelang of the University at Albany's School of Criminal Justice. In 1982, after his untimely death, it was renamed the Hindelang Criminal Justice Research Center.

Major projects at the center focus on incarceration and life outcomes, juries in capital cases, the Capital Punishment Research Initiative (with associated archives at the University Libraries), adolescent work and crime, reintegrating institutionalized youth, intergenerational transmission of antisocial behavior, collaborative crime analysis with New York State cities and localities, information for evidence based practice with youth and their families, and utilization of criminal justice statistics. The last project produces the Sourcebook Online, the key national source for criminal justice statistics. In the past 30 years, the center has provided the opportunity for more than 100 graduate students to participate in research and has awarded fellowships to doctoral students.

Research from the Hindelang center may be used directly in policy decision-making or disseminated through publications and colloquia. Many of these publications are available at Dewey Library (Hint: Ask for assistance at the Reference Desk).

If you are interested in more help with Criminal Justice Research, contact Mary Jane Brustman, our Criminal Justice Bibliographer. She can be contacted by email at mbrustman@uamail.albany.edu, or by phone 442-3540.

Blog post created by Matthew Laudicina

September 22, 2009

Getting Started with Criminal Justice Research

For some helpful pointers on doing criminal justice research, go to the My Research Subject on the left side of the University Libraries’ main web page. Selecting “Criminal Justice� will display some useful places to start your research.
•To search for journal articles, check out the list of Criminal Justice databases by clicking on Databases and Other Electronic Resources.
•Looking for websites with authority and high quality information? Check out Internet Resources for Criminal Justice.
•Criminal Justice: A Guide to Information Sources is a guide to help you find information resources for definitions, encyclopedias, legal research, statistics, and research guides.
•Resources for statistics can be found both in print at Dewey and online. Some great print resources include the Statistical Abstract of the United States, Statistical Handbook on Violence in America, and Crime State Rankings. The Criminal Justice Guide to Information Sources – Finding Statistics page provides call numbers for these and other print resources, as well as links to online resources.
•Check out the Criminal Justice Research Tutorial to test your knowledge on Criminal Justice research.

You may also be interested in archival and rare materials in our Special Collections department which provide criminal justice and prisons information. Also in Special Collections is the National Death Penalty Archive.

For help and additional information, contact the Criminal Justice Bibliographer Mary Jane Brustman at 442-3540 or email her: mbrustman@uamail.albany.edu.

Blog post created by Matthew Laudicina

July 14, 2009

TV Crime Shows: How Real Are They?

If you enjoy watching TV shows such as CSI, Law and Order and Cold Case, may we suggest the following book:
Round Up the Usual Suspects: Criminal Investigation in Law & Order, Cold Case and CSI/ by Raymond Ruble [ Dewey HV8073 R79 2009]

Ruble’s book explores these three television series, as well as Boomtown and Without a Trace, and the differences in how they get the answer to those crucial crime questions: Who did it, why and how? Law and Order follows a more legal structure in solving a crime case while CSI introduces the viewing audience to forensic science, a cocktail of biology, chemistry and physics lab investigating. Ruble takes each show and analyzes their different crime-solving tactics, emphasizing these shows capture audiences for several seasons. Crime shows have always been radically successful on American television and Ruble demonstrates how viewers are even more hooked on today’s television crime shows than ever.

Interested in reading this title? Find it at the Dewey library on the New Books shelf, located to the right of the color printer.

April 21, 2009

What exactly are Criminal Justice Faculty Researching?

Criminal Justice students interested in the research your faculty are doing, should check out the Hindelang Criminal Justice Research Center . Here you can find out about all of the current research center projects, independent research projects, and completed research center projects as well as a link to display the School of Criminal Justice alumni dissertations.

Some of the current projects are accomplishing notable work. For example, the Capital Punishment Research Initiative (National Death Penalty Archive) with James Acker and Charles Lanier as Project Co-Directors, and the Rochester Youth Development Study with Terence Thornberry as Project Director and Marvin Krohn, Alan Lizotte, and Shawn Bushway as Project Co-Directors are two high profile projects with national recognition.

To learn more about publications of a Hindelang Criminal Justice Research Center project— for example, the Rochester Youth Development Study:

Select the appropriate link on the Hidelang Criminal Justice Research Center page. In this case, http://www.albany.edu/hindelang/youth_study.html. The page appears containing the names of the Project Director and Project Co-Directors, a brief summary describing the work that they do, the projects and sponsoring agencies, a link to their publications, a list of the staff and office locations as well as appropriate contact information.

To read about the work this project has accomplished so far, select the “Publications� link in the middle of the page. The Rochester Youth Development Study (RYDS) Publication page appears. This page contains a list of the books, articles and chapters written by members of the RYDS project displayed by year of publication.

To see if we have a copy in our library of the following article, for example:
Ireland, T. O., Smith, C. A., and Thornberry, T. P. (2002). Developmental issues in the impact of child maltreatment on later delinquency and drug use. Criminology, 40(2), 359-399.

First we need to see if we have the journal Criminology in our library. From the library’s main web page , in the left hand column select “Minerva – Library Catalog�. On the “Basic Search page� select the “Journals� tab in the middle of the page. Enter Criminology in the field in the middle of the screen. “Search Type:� field will default to “Title begins with… (drop initial article)�. On the results page, select the second link to display our record for this journal. To see if we have the year, volume, and issue of this journal that we need, select the “Availability� link. You will see that we have Volume 40, Issue 2 for this journal in both print and online.

To find books you will want to search “Full Catalog� in Minerva. Note that if you are searching by title you will have to select “Title begins with….�

A search of “Databases & Indexes� can be used to bring up newer articles or other articles on the topic. Note that there is a specific list of recommended databases for criminal justice when you go to http://library.albany.edu/ and mouseover on “Databases & Indexes.� Generally you will want to start with the database Criminal Justice Abstracts, when looking for articles, or NCJRS Abstracts Database when looking for reports. When looking for very recent articles EBSCO Academic Premier Database is often an excellent supplement to the major criminal justice databases. Our search retrieved one very recent article on RYDS: Krohn, M.D., Hall, G.P. and Lizotte (2009), A.J. Family transitions and later delinquency and drug use. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 38(3), 466-480.

For detailed information on how to select and use databases to find articles, books, and reports consult our Criminal Justice Research Tutorial . And feel free to contact Criminal Justice Bibliographer Mary Jane Brustman by email mbrustman@uamail.albany.edu or by phone 442-3540.


Blog post created by Judith Mueller

March 24, 2009

Criminal Justice Careers

If you a Criminal Justice student who is interested in learning more about what you can do with your degree, look no further. With a degree in criminal justice you can work in a number of different occupations. Some occupations require additional studying. A few are as follows:

  • Law Enforcement Administration

  • Correctional Administration

  • Research and Teaching

  • Lawyer

  • Paralegal

  • Corrections Officer

  • Judge

  • Police, Detective, FBI, DEA, U.S. Marshal, INS, Customs Inspector

  • Private Detective, Investigator

  • Probation Officer

  • Court Reporter

Professional associations are very good places to look for information about different careers. There are many different associations for the various criminal justice careers. A few associations are as follows:

For a list of other associations, see the Criminal Justice Library Subject pages.

Both the University Library and Dewey Library have a number of excellent reference books that might provide you with some helpful career guidance:

  • Criminal Justice and Criminology : a career guide to local, state, federal and academic positions by James F. Anderson, Nancie Jean Mangels, and Laronistine Dyson – Dewey Library / HV 9950 A54X 2003

  • Federal Law Enforcement Careers : profiles of 250 high-powered positions and tactics for getting hired by Thomas H. Ackerman – University Library / Reference: HF 5381 A3544X 2006

  • FBI Careers : the ultimate guide to landing a job as one of America’s finest by Thomas H. Ackerman – University Library / Reference: HF 5381 A354X 2006

  • Opportunities in Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice Careers by James Stinchcomb – University Library / Reference: HF 5381 S86X 2003

  • Great Jobs for Criminal Justice Majors by Stephen Lambert and Debra Regan – University Library / Reference: HF 5381 L2537X 2001

  • Career Opportunities in Forensic Science by Susan Echaore-McDavid and Richard A. McDavid – University Library / Reference: HF 5381 E62X 2008

For more information about Criminal Justice careers, see the School of Criminal Justice’s web page Careers in Criminal Justice. When you are ready to begin searching for a job in a particular field, see the School of Criminal Justice’s don't forget to look at their job search strategies.

If you have any questions about researching Criminal Justice careers, you can also contact Mary Jane Brustman, our subject specialist for Criminal Justice. Feel free to contact her at mbrustman@uamail.albany.edu, or by phone at 442-3517.

Blog post created by Judith Mueller

February 24, 2009

Criminal Justice Students doing Research look no Further!

If you are doing research in criminal justice, you might want to check out the Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR) database . This database “is the world’s largest archive of digital social science data.� It is a part of the University of Michigan’s Institute for Social Research.. ICPSR’s mission is to acquire, preserve, and distribute original data as well as to provide training in its analysis. Since the University at Albany is a member of ICPSR, most of the files in the archive are free to download. This data is in a form that can be used with statistical software such as SAS, SPSS, and Stata. If you are a researcher willing to let others access your data, you can contribute your data to ICPSR as well. ICPSR also contains data in the fields of sociology, political science, demography, history, economics, gerontology, public health, education, and international relations.

You can access the ICPSR database from the Databases & Indexes page by either typing in “ICPSR� in the “Find a database� field or by selecting the letter “I� in the “Browse by database title� field.
The data from ICPSR can also be accessed from National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD) which is also sponsored by the University at Michigan. This database is funded by ICPSR, as well as the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the U.S. Department of Justice, and the National Institute of Justice.

To access the data of interest to criminal justice students, on the ICPSR home page display the “Our Research� menu at the top of the screen and select : Research Projects. Then display the menu in the “Show me all items related to : field and select “Criminology and Criminal Justice� and select the “Go� button.

The following projects are displayed:
• CrimeStat –is a spatial statistics program for the analysis of crime incident locations.( http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/CRIMESTAT/)
• Minority Data Resource Center (MDRC) – is an archive that provides data resources for the comparative analysis of issues affecting racial and ethnic minority populations in the United States. (http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/MDRC/)
• National Archive of Criminal Justice Data (NACJD) – contains over 700 data collections related to criminal justice. (http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/NACJD/)
• Project on Human Development in Chicago Neighborhoods (PHDCN) – is a large scale, interdisciplinary study of how families, schools, and neighborhoods affect child and adolescent development.( http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/PHDCN/)
• Terrorism & Preparedness Data Resource Center (TPDRC) – archives and distributes data collected by government agencies, non-governmental agencies, and researchers about the nature of domestic and international terrorism incidents, organizations, perpetrators, and victims. (http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/TPDRC/)

The ICPSR contact here at the University at Albany Libraries is the librarian Lorre Smith. Earlier this month she held two classes that gave a brief introduction to ICPSR, how to search the archives, and how to download data. If you missed these classes and would like some help with learning more about ICPSR, feel free to contact Lorre Smith in the Science Library by phone (437-3946) or by email (lsmith@uamail.albany.edu).

Blog post created by Judith Mueller

January 27, 2009

Did you know that our Science Library maintains the ONLY National Death Penalty Archive?

The University at Albany’s libraries and the Capital Punishment Research Initiative, part of our School of Criminal Justice, jointly established the National Death Penalty Archive (NDPA) in August of 2005. This collection is housed in the M. E. Grenander Department of Special Collections and Archives located in the Science Library. This archive is the first of its kind in the nation that is exclusively dedicated to the history of the death penalty in the United States. The archive specializes in collecting primary source documents (letters, reports, unpublished writings, personal papers, and other related materials) written and/or owned by anyone touched by the death penalty (death penalty activists, lawyers, family members, etc.) The archive also includes interviews featuring death penalty activists and professionals involved in death penalty abolition efforts and related work.

In the University Libraries we have other sources of information on the death penalty with the Library of Congress subject heading of the Death Penalty. We also have access to any available government documents electronically through the NCJRS (National Criminal Justice Reference Service) Abstracts database and the Bureau of Justice Statistics website.

Included in our collection are books written by a few of the leading death penalty experts. These experts and their books include:


  • Wounds That do not Bind: Victim-Based Perspectives on the Death Penalty edited by our own CPRI Professor James Acker along with David R. Karp and Jarrett B. Warshaw can be found at Dewey Library / HV 8694 W68 2006

  • America’s Experiment with Capital Punishment: Reflections on the Past, Present, and Future of the Ultimate Penal Sanction by our own James Acker and Hindeland Center volunteer staff associate Charles Lanier, and Robert M. Bohm can be found at Dewey Library / HV 8699 U5 A746 1998

  • Killing as Punishment: Reflection on the Death Penalty in America by Hugo Adam Bedau can be found at Dewey Library / HV 8699 U5 B43 2004

  • Capital Punishment Clemency Petitions by William Bowers can be found in the Special Collections/ Archives manuscript collection MSS APAP-214

  • Condemned : Inside the Sing Sing Death House by Scott Christianson can be found at Dewey Library / HV 8699 U5 C4 2000

  • The Death Penalty: An American History by Stuart Banner can be found at Dewey Library / HV 8699 U 5 B367 2002

  • Deathquest II: An Introduction to the Theory and Practice of Capital Punishment in the United States by Robert M. Bohm can be found at Dewey Library / HV 8699 U5 B65 2003

  • America without the Death Penalty: States Leading the Way by John F. Galliher can be found at Dewey Library / HV 8699 U5 G35 2002

  • Dead Man Walking by Helen Prejean can be found at Dewey Library / HV 8699 U5 P74 1993

  • The Abolition of the Death Penalty in International Law by William A. Schabas can be found at Dewey Library / K 5104 S33 2002

  • A Comparative Analysis of Capital Punishment: Statues, Policies, Frequencies and Public Attitudes the World Over by Rita J. Simon and Dagny A. Blaskowich can be found at Dewey Library / HV 8699 S55 2002

  • The Hangman’s Knot: Lynching, Legal Execution, and America’s Struggle with the Death Penalty by Eliza Steelwater can be found at Dewey Library / HV 8699 U5 S72 2003

  • The Contradictions of American Capital Punishment by Franklin E. Zimring can be found at Dewey Library / HV 8699 U5 Z563 2003

If you are interested in research on the death penalty or other criminal justice topics, please make an appointment with Mary Jane Brustman, our Bibliographer for Criminal Justice. She can be reached at 442-3517 or by e-mail at mbrustman@uamail.albany.edu.

Blog post created by Judith Mueller

November 18, 2008

Key Criminal Justice Resources

When starting a new research project it helps to get ideas for a topic or to find definitions and summary information on this topic when beginning your research. Good places to look for this information are subject-specific dictionaries and encyclopedias. Encyclopedias are also good places to find out about the major scholars in a particular field as well as any major writings on the subjects. Luckily for those studying criminal justice, Dewey Library has two exceptional encyclopedias on the subject: the Encyclopedia of Crime and Justice and the Encyclopedia of Crime and Punishment.

The current edition of the Encyclopedia of Crime and Justice is the second edition. This edition has been largely rewritten from the first edition. The essays were written by respected scholars and include a list of related topics as well as a bibliography. Many of the essays also include a list of leading court cases. Although the focus is on the United States there are a number of essays that deal with international issues. This encyclopedia also includes a glossary, a legal index containing a table of cases and other cited legal documents, as well as a general index for all four volumes.

The Encyclopedia of Crime and Justice can be found with the reference books upstairs in Dewey Library at Reference HV 6017 E52 2002. It also can be found online.

The Encyclopedia of Crime and Punishment is a new reference source. This encyclopedia comes in four volumes with 430 signed essays. Each essay also includes a list of related topics as well as a section suggesting sources for further reading. This reference source is written in a manner that makes it easy to browse and useful for the beginning student of criminal justice.

Another useful aspect to this reference source is that each volume has its own appendix. The topics contained in these four appendices are: 'Careers in Criminal Justice', 'Web Resources', 'Professional and Scholarly Organizations', and a 'Selected Bibliography'. The fourth volume also contains a chronology of events in criminal justice from 1795 B.C.E. to the present.

In summary, the Encyclopedia of Crime and Justice is focused more on criminology (the study of crime as a social phenomenon) while the Encyclopedia of Crime and Punishment is more focused on criminal justice (the study of all crime and societies reaction to it). As such, the Encyclopedia of Crime and Punishment is more practical and useful for the beginning student while the Encyclopedia of Crime and Justice is more theoretical and useful for the advanced student.

So, when searching for ideas or for a place to start your research in criminal justice, make your first stop be one or both of the above encyclopedias.


Blog post created by Judith Mueller

October 21, 2008

Doing Criminal Justice Research?

The University at Albany Libraries subscribe to the National Criminal Justice Reference Service (NCJRS). NCJRS provides a comprehensive bibliographic database that is federally funded and contains justice and abuse information from many different government agencies and organizations. This database contains summaries of the more than 200,000 criminal justice, juvenile justice, and substance abuse resources that make up the NCJRS Library collection.

You can access this database by first going to the library’s Databases & Indexes page and selecting ‘N’. From here you can choose to use NCJRS using either the Cambridge Scientific Abstracts (CSA) interface or by going directly to the US Department of Justice web site. Either way, you have access to many resources including federal, state, and local government reports, books, research reports, journal articles, and unpublished research produced since 1975.

If you need more help with Criminal Justice research, stop by the reference desk or contact Mary Jane Brustman (mbrustman@uamail.albany.edu) to set up an appointment.

Blog post created by Judith Mueller

September 23, 2008

Getting Started with Criminal Justice Research

For some helpful pointers on doing criminal justice research, go to the My Research Subject…field on the right hand side of the library’s main web page. Select Criminal Justice to display some useful places to start your research.

April 1, 2008

New Interface for National Criminal Justice Reference Service

The National Criminal Justice Reference Service (NCJRS) is a comprehensive bibliographic database funded by the federal government. The University at Albany Libraries now subscribes to this database through the Cambridge Scientific Abstracts (CSA) platform.

This resource covers roughly 197,000 criminal justice publications. The most robust aspect of NCJRS is its collection of reports from federal, state, and local governments and organizations. The database coverage runs from 1972 to the present.

NCJRS access is available from the library Databases and Indexes page. If you use NCJRS, let us know your thoughts about the CSA platform. We welcome your comments –whether made on this blog or directly to a librarian.

Are you looking for tips to search more effectively? Do you have other research questions? You can contact the Reference Desk (stop by, phone 442-3691, send an e-mail). For questions specific to Criminal Justice Research, contact Mary Jane Brustman to set up an appointment.

February 5, 2008

New Look and Features to Social Welfare and Criminal Justice Subject Guides

LIbrarians who are Subject Specialsts here at UAlbany have created online guides, to help you get the "lay of the land" with regard to key library resources for your academic discipline. These guides are found on the sidebar of our Dewey pages, under the heading: My Research Subject . You will also find them in the pull-down menu of the UA Libraries' main page .

Bibliographer (also the Head of Dewey) Mary Jane Brustman has updated the Subject Guides for Social Welfare and Criminal Justice.

The guides now include information about resources relevant resources in our Special Collections Department. For example, Special Collections has an archive of materials from Neighborhood and Community Associations, which may be useful for Social Welfare researchers; and The National Death Penalty Archive, of interest to some Criminal Justice researchers.

In addition to a slightly redesigned format (e.g., the guides now display an image of a recently published work by departmental faculty), the Social Welfare and Criminal Justice Subject Guides also have a "mini-update" at the bottom listing upcoming classes and library events that pertain to the subject.

We hope you'll take a look at the Subject Guides and provide us wiith feedback -- how helpful are these guides? What can we do to make them more useful? Our purpose is to make the library easier for you to use, so we welcome your opinions.

June 28, 2007

Dewey Librarians Contribute Criminal Justice Expertise to Noted Reference Resource

Mary Jane Brustman and Richard Irving were contributors to the recently published reference series Resources for College Libraries. This seven-volume set offers a core collection of hand-selected titles in 58 curriculum-specific subject areas. The purpose of this reference is to assist academic librarians with the selection of materials in their subject areas. Dick served as a bibliographer for the Criminal Justice section (i.e., he selected which resources would be included) and Mary Jane was the editor of that chapter.

If you are interested in perusing Resources for College Libraries, it may be found in the Dewey Reference section, call number REF Z 1039 C65 R35X 2006.

November 29, 2006

More Criminal Justice Journals Now Available Online

Criminal Justice Abstracts now contains fulltext articles from 17 major research journals.

With the University Libraries’ subscription to Criminology:a Sage Full-Text Collection, articles from Crime and Delinquency, Homicide Studies, Police Quarterly, Theoretical Criminology, and other journals published by Sage Publications are available as PDF files within the Criminal Justice Abstracts database.

Access to Criminal Justice Abstracts is available through the Database Finder.

For assistance with searching this database, or other criminal justice research, contact Mary Jane Brustman.

October 19, 2006

Reference Resource: Punishment In America: A Reference Handbook

Title: Punishment in America: A Reference Handbook.
Author: Cyndi Banks
Publication information: (2005) Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-Clio, Inc.
Dewey Location: REF HV 9466 B35 2005

The idea of punishing people in our society raises many questions. Our first Reference Resource begins to answer such questions as:

“Why should offenders be punished at all? How did punishment originate, and what should be its purpose? Howe does society decide what are the most appropriate ways to punish and how have these methods of punishment changed over time and why? Do we punish because we believe in retribution, or do we just think it is better to lock up all criminals and incapacitate them so they cannot reoffend? �

The book is organized into several sections. The first is a section titled: “The History of Punishment in America,� which discusses: the use of corporal punishment, the growth of the penitentiary, reformatories, and the movement toward rehabilitation and community service. Another section, “Problems, Controversies and Solutions,� discusses major policy issues surrounding punishment, such as: gender issues, capital punishment, white collar crime, and privatization of prisons. The global perspective is touched upon, and a chronology of major events in the history of punishment is provided. Very brief, one paragraph biographical sketches of notables who influenced our concept of punishment in America include: John Augustus, Alexis de Tocqueville, Thomas Eddy and others. A “Facts and Data� section gives information on the prison population, number of sex offenders, incarceration rates, and death penalty statistics. In addition, there is a section providing agencies and organizations that deal with this topic, as well as a bibliography of print and non-print resources.

The heart and soul of this book is the section providing the history of punishment in America, and it is a good resource to get the “big picture� on this important topic. This background information may be helpful to provide the context for an issue that is being researched or possibly help a researcher focus from a broad concept to a research thesis.

You will find this book in the Reference Section of the Dewey Library.