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April 1, 2014

Topics in Social Work: DSM Library Now Available!

brain.jpgThe American Psychiatric Association’s 2013 DSM Library, including the updated The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, is now available online. The DSM-5 is a classification and diagnostic tool used by a variety of professionals ranging from psychologists to insurance providers. The text consists of three main sections: DSM-5 basics, Diagnostic Criteria and Codes and Emerging Measures and Models. The third section, Emerging Measures and Models is particularly helpful for social work students who want to stay current with regards to patient assessment measures.

The fifth edition includes important changes like the redefinition of autism to autism spectrum disorder. This umbrella term means that old distinctions like Asperger’s disorder are no longer listed as individual disorders. Learning disorders have also taken the same route. Instead of reading disorder or mathematics disorder, learning disorders are listed under specific learning disorder. Other notable additions include gambling disorder, an expanded substance-related definition as well as impulse-control disorder. The database also offers previous iterations of the resource, allowing students a chance to examine how professional thought on mental disorder has evolved.

dsm-v.jpgThe DSM Library includes the Handbook of Differential Diagnosis, an excellent resource for students. The section entitled Differential Diagnosis Step by Step works as a useful guide for clinicians-in-training, listing the appropriate steps to take in a simple yet comprehensive manner. Differential Diagnosis by the Trees, and Differential Diagnosis by the Table provide a more detailed visual explanation of each disorder and the steps necessary to diagnose it.

DSM-5 Clinical Cases is a practical guide based on the disorders described in the book. This is a great way for students to connect theory with real-world cases. The book’s 19 chapters include sections on anxiety disorders, gender dysphoria and personality disorders complete with the actual case study, a diagnosis, discussion and suggested readings.

For more information on how to use this resource, contact Elaine Lasda Bergman, Social Welfare, Gerontology and Dewey Reference Bibliographer, at elasdabergman@albany.edu or 442-3695.

Blog post created by Mark Seabury

March 18, 2014

Research in Social Welfare: Social Services for Returning Veterans

support_our_veterans.jpgThe social service needs of returning veterans are an area of growing interest and importance for social workers. According to the Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America, approximately 2.5 million vets served in those two conflicts alone. Combat takes its toll on our soldiers, and many face serious issues when they return to civilian life. The following lists provide social work researchers and social workers with resources for understanding and studying the issues faced by our veterans.

Books (print and online)

The Wounded Warrior Handbook : a resource guide for returning veterans, by Janelle Hill, Cheryl Lawhorne, and Don Philpott. (2012). Dewey Library / UB 363 P55 2012

150 Best Jobs for the Military-to-Civilian Transition, by Laurence Shatkin. (2013). Dewey Library/ UB 357 S53 2013

Advances in Social Work Practice with the Military, edited by Joan Beder. (2012). Dewey Library / U 22.3 A36 2012.

Serving America’s Veterans : a reference handbook, by/ Lawrence J. Korb .. [et al.].(2012). Dewey Library / Reference: UB 357 S47 2009.

The Costs of Courage : combat stress, warriors, and family survival / Josephine G. Pryce, David H. Pryce, Kimberly K. Shackelford.(2011) Dewey Library / UB 357 P79 2012.

Life After the Military: A Handbook for Transitioning Veterans, by Janelle Hill. Online.

Resources from the National Association of Social Workers:

The Emerging Needs of Veterans: A Call to Action for the Social Work Profession

Veterans Aided with Transition Struggle

We Have Much to Offer Veterans

Other Websites:

Joint Forces - Federal government website with comprehensive information on services and resources for returning veterans

New York State Division of Veterans’ Affairs - New York State’s website with information on healthcare, housing, employment assistance and more.

Veteran Employment Center - run by Monster.com, this tool provides a “translator” for military skills to aid veteran transitions to civilian employment.

Veterans Job Bank - National Resources Directory provides information on veteran employment across the US.

MyFreeTaxes.com - tax services for low income families and veterans.

If you are interested in researching the issues faced by returning veterans and the services available to them, please contact Elaine Lasda Bergman, our Social Welfare Subject Specialist. She can be reached at elasdabergman@albany.edu.

Blog post created by Mark Seabury and Elaine Lasda Bergman
image credit: http://al291.org/index.php?id=127

February 25, 2014

Drugs and Substance Abuse - New Resources

Drugs, addiction and substance abuse are perennially topics of significant interest to students, particularly at the downtown campus. These topics are often multi-and interdisciplinary, particularly for those studying from a social work or social services perspective. Here are some of the new books on drugs and addiction that may be of interest to social work students and faculty:

emergin perspetives.JPGEmerging Perspectives on Substance Misuse (2013). Willm Mistral, ed.
Dewey Library/HV 4998 E44 2013
This compact volume features a number of essays related to drug use. Topics are related to treatment paradigms and considerations, newer profiles of addictive behaviors and interventions, new screening techniques, policy and legal considerations. The editor states that the volume is meant to provide evidence-based research that moves current thinking about substance abuse treatment and policy forward, rather than relying solely on traditional thinking about this social problem.

parenting and substance.jpgParenting and Substance Abuse (2013).Nancy E. Suchman, et al., eds.
Dewey Library/HV 4999 P37 2013
Focusing on parents who are substance abusers, this work provides essays and articles from a variety of experts on efforts to integrate parenting intervention research with substance abuse treatment research. The first section is dedicated to theory—how does addiction impact the developmental process of parenting? The second section identifies assessment, evaluation, intervention and treatment. The book covers this topic from a variety of perspectives - social services, psychology, biology, genetics, and so forth. The material is comprehensive and evidence-based and should provide students and researchers with a thorough understanding of the issues related to parent-addicts.

key concepts.JPGKey Concepts in Drugs and Society (2013). Ross Coomber, et al., eds.
Dewey Library HV 5801 K49 2013
A general overview of drug use and abuse, this book include brief basics on addiction. Topics include typical drugs that are abused, settings in which drugs are frequently abused, cultural variations in drug use and abuse, drug violence and crime, health hazards of using illicit drugs, addiction prevention, historical issues, and drug testing. The objective of this book is to highlight the key issues in each area, and there are substantial references to help students and researchers to locate information that will help them go more in depth on each topic.

judging addicts.gifJudging Addicts (2013). Rebecca Tiger.
Dewey Library/ KF 3890 T54 2013
The increase in incarceration rates is a collateral issue related to addiction and drug crime. This work provides research on the drug court system, in which persons who commit drug-related crime are sent to drug treatment programs in lieu of prison. The author discusses the issues related to society’s handling of drug abuse from both criminal and medical perspectives, and how these diverging paradigms increase “punitive control” over addicts and do not effectively work to decrease drug related crime in society. The author argues that drug court should be completely separate from the criminal justice system as a first step in improving the handling of social problems related to drug abuse and abusers.

If you would like more information on finding books, articles, statistics or other information related to drug abuse and addiction, please contact Social Welfare Bibliographer, Elaine Lasda Bergman at elasdabergman@albany.edu.

January 28, 2014

Be An Author! Publishing in Social Welfare

Writing is an essential skill for any social welfare scholar. Whether writing for a class, professional writing when you are out in the field, or writing scholarly research, the Dewey Graduate Library has a number of resources to guide you through the writing process. The NASW published an interesting website that shows social workers’ publications are very infrequently mentioned in the media or cited in scholarly literature. They posted an interesting article with an number of tips for social workers who wish to be published. Here are some helpful resources if you are interested in professional writing for the social work field:

American, P. A. (2010). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
Dewey Library / Reference: LB 2369 A62X 2010

Belcher, W. L. (2009). Writing your journal article in 12 weeks: a guide to academic publishing success. Los Angeles, Calif: SAGE Publications.
Dewey Library / Reference: Z 471 B45 2009

Healy, K. (2007). Writing skills for social workers. Los Angeles, CA; London, UK: Sage Publications.
Dewey Library / HV 29.7 H43 2007

Kitchin, R. (2005). The academics’ guide to publishing. London; Thousand Oaks, Calif: SAGE Publications.
Dewey Library / Reference: Z 286 S37 K58 2005

National, A. of S. W. (2009). An author's guide to social work journals (5th ed.). Washington, DC: NASW Press.
Dewey Library / Reference: HV 85 M46 2009

Professional writing for the human services. (1993). Washington, DC: National Association of Social Workers, NASW Press.
Dewey Library / Reference: HV 41 P759 1993

Szuchman, L. T. (2008). Writing with style: APA style for social work (3rd ed.). Australia?; Belmont, CA: Thomson Brooks/Cole.
Dewey Library / Reference: LB 2369 W85X 2008

The Columbia guide to social work writing. (2012). New York: Columbia University Press.
Dewey Library / Reference: HV 29.7 C65 2012

If you have any questions about these resources or other social work topics, please contact Elaine Lasda Bergman our social welfare subject specialist at 442-3695 or elasdabergman@albany.edu

November 14, 2013

Researching Human Trafficking

traffickingservices_cover.jpgHuman trafficking is a grave social issue and one that many social
welfare students and researchers may wish to study. We have all seen the many stories about human trafficking in the news. The Office of Refugee Resettlement (a subunit of the Administration for Children and Families defines human trafficking as “a form of modern day slavery” which can be sex trafficking but also other types of labor exploitation.   The Office of  Health and Human Services has published a resource guide with Services Available to Victims of Human Trafficking that may be of interest to social welfare students as well as social workers in the field.

We have a large number of resources on this topic that may be helpful to you if you are writing a paper or beginning research on the topic of human trafficking. Here are some select books and articles available at the
University Libraries. In addition, we have listed some of the key websites of government, social service, and advocacy organizations which focus on this important social issue.

Books Available at the University Libraries:

Child Exploitation and Trafficking: Examining the Global Challenges and U.S. Responses by Virginia M. Kendall and T. Markus Funk. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, c2012. Dewey Library / KF 9449 K46 2012.

A Girl’s Path to Prostitution: Linking Caregiver Adversity to Child Susceptibility by Joan A. Reid. El Paso: LFB Scholarly Pub., 2012. Dewey Library / HQ 118 R45 2012.

Global Perspectives on Prostitution and Sex Trafficking edited by Rochelle L. Dalla, et al. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, c2011. Dewey Library / HQ 118 G56 2011.

From Human Trafficking to Human Rights: Reframing Contemporary Slavery edited by Alison Brysk and Austin Choi-Fitzpatrick. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, c2012. Dewey Library / HT 867 F676 2012.

Migration, Prostitution, and Human Trafficking: The Voice of Chinese Women by Min Liu.New Brunswick, N.J. : Transaction Publishers, c2011. University Library/ HQ 250 L584X 2011.

Sex Trafficking: Inside the Business of Modern Slavery by Siddharth Kara. New York: Columbia University Press, c2009. University Library/ HQ 281 K37 2009.

Sex Slaves and Serfs: The Dynamics of Human Trafficking in a Small Florida Town by Erin C. Heil. Boulder, CO: FirstForumPress, 2012. Dewey Library / HD 4865 U6 H45 2012.

Sex Trafficking, Human Rights and Social Justice edited by Tiantian Zheng. London ; New York : Routledge, c2010. Dewey Library / HQ 281 S49 2010.

The Slave Next Door: Human Trafficking and Slavery in America Today by Kevin Bales and Ron Soodalter. Berkeley, CA; London: University of California Press, c2009. University Library / HQ 314 B35X 2009.

Smuggling and Trafficking in Human Beings: All Roads Lead to America by Sheldon X. Zhang. Westport, CT: Praeger Publishers, 2007. Dewey Library / HQ 281 Z53 2007.

The Snakehead: An Epic Tale of the Chinatown Underworld and the American Dream by Patrick Radden Keefe. New York: Anchor Books, 2010, c2009. University Library / HQ 281 K44X 2010.

The War on Human Trafficking: U.S. Policy Assessed by Anthony M. DeStefano. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, c2007. Dewey Library / HQ 125 U6 D47 2007.

Select Articles:

Alvarez, M. B., & Alessi, E. J. (2012). Human trafficking is more than sex trafficking and prostitution: Implications for social work. AFFILIA:Journal of Women And Social Work, 27(2), 142-152. 

Androff, D. K. (2011). The problem of contemporary slavery: An international human rights challenge for social work. International Social Work, 54(2), 209-222.

Bjelajac, Z., Spalevic, Z., & Banovic, B. (2013). Psychophysical status of human trafficking victims. Healthmed, 7(4), 1341-1346.

Heinrich, K., & Sreeharsha, K. (2013). The State of State Human-Trafficking Laws. Judges' Journal, 52(1), 28-31.

Kotrla, K. K. (2010). Domestic minor sex trafficking in the United States. Social Work, 55(2), 181-187.

Perdue, T., Prior, M., Williamson, C., & Sherman, S. (2012). Social justice and spiritual healing: Using micro and macro social work practice to reduce domestic minor sex trafficking. Social Work and Christianity, 39(4),449-465.

Palmer, N. (2010). The Essential Role of Social Work in Addressing Victims and Survivors of Trafficking. ILSA Journal of International & Comparative Law, 17(1), 43-56.

Wolf-Branigin, M., Garza, S., & Smith, M. A. (2010). Reducing demand for human trafficking: A non-linear approach for developing capacity. Social Work and Christianity, 37(4),424-436.

Select Web Resources:

Polaris Project for a World without Slavery
--Information on both sex and labor trafficking
--Includes a section on recognizing signs of trafficking in your community
--Operates the National Human Trafficking Resource Center - 24-hour hotline, training, etc.
--Includes information on resources, groups, laws, stats, etc. by state: New York State Resources

DHS Human Trafficking Page
--Blue Campaign unites DHS components to combat human trafficking through public awareness, training, victim assistance and law enforcement
--Tip hotline for reporting human trafficking incidents
--Information on recognizing trafficking

Bureau of Justice Statistics report: Characteristics of Human Trafficking Incidents, 2008-2010
--Statistical information about human trafficking

FBI Human Trafficking page: 
--Overview of FBI initiatives
--Information on related laws/statutes
--Tip Hotline
--Links to other government agency human trafficking pages

Fact Sheet for Schools 
--Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, US Department of Education
--Information for reporting and identifying victims of human trafficking
--Contains Links to other resources

As always, if you have questions about locating information and resources for your projects related to human trafficking or other social welfare topics, please contact Elaine Lasda Bergman, our Social Welfare Subject Specialist at the Dewey Library. She can be reached at elasdabergman@albany.edu or 442-3695.

Blog post created by Cary Gouldin and Elaine Lasda Bergman

October 29, 2013

Social Welfare Policy Research: Where to Begin

Whether you are interested in healthcare reform, federal housing assistance or the child welfare system, researching topics in social welfare policy requires an interdisciplinary approach, encompassing resources from both the social welfare and public policy fields. Fortunately, the University Libraries has extensive collections in both fields.


As always, our reference collection is an ideal place to start you research. Reference resources provide an overview of a topic, including history, key terms and important events. The International Encyclopedia of Social Policy  contains over 700 entries  on topics in social policy from around the world written by leading specialists, providing authoritative coverage of concepts, policy actors, welfare institutions and services. The Comprehensive Handbook of Social Work and Social Welfare ,a four volume set, provides an overview of the social work field. The fourth volume focuses on social policy and policy practice and provides a substantive overview of the issues.


The Libraries have many books all aspects of social welfare policy, which can be found through Minerva,  our online catalog. Some recent additions to the collection include:


Comprehensive Handbook of Social Work and Social Welfare edited by Karen M. Sowers and Catherine N. Dulmus. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, c2008. Dewey Library / Reference: HV 40 C635 2008.


The Politics of Social Welfare in America by Glenn David Mackin. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2013. Online / HV 95 M254 2013 WWW.


The Politics of Policy Change: Welfare, Medicare, and Social Security Reform in the United States by Daniel Beland and Alex Waddan. Washington, DC: Georgetown University Press, c2012. Dewey Library / HN 65 B423 2012.


The Dilemma of American Social Welfare by William M. Epstein. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers, 2012. Dewey Library / HV 91 E67 2012.

 

Poverty in Common: The Politics of Community Action during the American Century by Alyosha Goldstein. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2012. University Library / HC 110 P63 G6593 2012.

 

Voices for Children: Rhetoric and Public Policy by William T. Gormley, Jr. Washington, DC: Brookings Institution Press, c2012. Dewey Library / HV 741 G645 2012.

 

The Political Economy of European Welfare Capitalism by Colin Hay and Daniel Wincott. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2012. University Library / JC 479 H389 2012.

 

Policy Creation and Evaluation: Understanding Welfare Reform in the United States by Richard Hoefer. New York: Oxford University Press, c2012. Dewey Library / HV 95 H553 2012.

 

Finding journal articles on social welfare policy requires searching databases in both the public policy and social welfare fields, including:

GalleryWatch CRS Reports covers Congressional Research Service reports, which are provided to members of Congress at their request. Each is an objective, nonpartisan analysis on an issue considered by congress.

 

PAIS International provides references to books, journal articles, government documents, and privately published research reports on almost any topic that has a public affairs dimension. It is international in coverage.

 

Social Services Abstracts bibliographic coverage of current research focused on social work, human services, and related areas, including social welfare, social policy, and community development.

 

Social Work Abstracts covers journals and dissertations in social work and related disciplines from the NASW.

 

Contemporary Women’s Issues  offers content from mainstream periodicals, alternative press, hard-to-find newsletters and NGO research reports. It focuses on the critical issues and events that influence women including health, the workplace, parenting, human rights, reproductive rights and legal issues.

 

LexisNexis Academic  provides access to over 10,000 news, business, and legal sources, including national and international newspapers, law review articles, the federal register, federal codes, statutes and regulations. It also provides access to the renowned Shepard's Citations service for all federal and states court cases back to 1789 which tracks all references and treatments of the case as well as if it has been overturned.

 

Popline  provides worldwide coverage of population, family planning, and related health issues, including family planning technology and programs, fertility, and population law and policy. In addition, POPLINE focuses on particular developing-country issues including demography, AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, maternal and child health, primary health care communication, and population and environment.

 

Westlaw Campus provides access to over 800 law reviews and journals, all federal and state cases including U.S. Supreme Court cases, statutes from all 50 states and D.C. and administrative codes from all 44 states, the full body of federal administrative regulations, and over 50,000 pages of current regulatory, administrative, and executive materials generated by key federal entities. It also provides access to newspapers, magazines, newswires and local and nationals broadcast transcripts.

 

More information on researching social welfare policy topics, including finding statistics, analysis, think tanks and advocacy groups, can be found on the Social Welfare LibGuides and the Public Administration and Policy LibGuides.

 

Blog post created by Cary Gouldin

September 24, 2013

Topics in Social Welfare: Impaired Social Workers

Social work is a challenging and, at times, stressful profession. Finding successful and healthy ways to manage stress can be challenging, and, unfortunately, something that not all professionals are able to do. Add to that the stress of personal issues like family and money, and the result can be a professional who is suffering from a mental illness or addiction.

The National Association of Social Workers’ (NASW) Code of Ethics states that “Social workers should not allow their own personal problems, psychosocial distress, legal problems, substance abuse, or mental health difficulties to interfere with their professional judgment and performance or to jeopardize the best interests of people for whom they have a professional responsibility.” It also makes professionals aware of a colleague’s impairment responsible for assisting the colleague where possible and reporting him or her when necessary. Violators are subject to the NASW professional review process.

Given the personal embarrassment those suffering from addiction and mental illness often feel and the potential effect this impairment can have on a social worker’s profession, many are reluctant to discuss their condition, especially with others on the field. As a result, finding research on this topic can also be challenging. Fortunately, the University Libraries have some resources and databases that can help.

A good place to start your research is Chapter 20 of The Social Worker’s Desk Reference, which provides an overview of the topic, including ethical issues, causes of and responses to impairment, and a look at how the profession can improve its handling of such cases. The chapter also includes a handy list of resources on the topic to help you expand your search.

The Libraries have a few books on addiction and social work professionals:

Robert Holman Coombs. Drug-Impaired Professionals. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1997. Science Library / RC 564.5 P76 C66 1997.

Edgar P. Nace. Achievement and Addiction: A Guide to the Treatment of Professionals. New York: Brunner/Mazel, c1995. Dewey Library / RC 564.5 P76 N33 1995.

We also have many articles on the topic. Articles can be found in databases like PsychINFO, PubMed and Social Services Abstracts using the following search terms: “impaired professional”, “personal therapy”, and “impaired social worker”. Here is a selected list of articles:

Culbreth, J. R. (2000). Substance abuse counselors with and without a personal history of chemical dependency: A review of the literature. Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly, 18(2), 67-82.

Reamer, F. G. (1992). The impaired social worker. Social Work, 37(2), 165-170. Social Services Abstracts.

Pooler, David K., Darcy Siebert, Anna Faul, and Ruth Huber. (2008). Personal history and professional impairment: implications for social workers and their employers. Administration in Social Work 32:69-85. Criminal Justice Periodicals Index.

Sonnenstuhl, William. (1989). Reaching the impaired professional: Applying findings from organizational and occupational research. Journal of Drug Issues 19:533-539.

For more information on resources in this or other Social Welfare topics, contact subject specialist Elaine Lasda Bergman at 442-3695 or elasdabergman@albany.edu.

Blog post created by Cary Gouldin.


August 27, 2013

What is the Social Work Information Literacy Requirement?

The School of Social Welfare's MSW program has an information literacy component consisting of two library seminars. Many students have questions about which seminars are most appropriate for their course of study

All Social Welfare students must take the Social Welfare Research Seminar. This seminar is required within your first 15 credit hours in the program. You will learn about basic library services and resources that are particularly helpful for social welfare research, including databases, encyclopedias, internet resources. This class will provide you with a general orientation to beginning social welfare research using materials in the library, and teach you some advanced database searching strategies.

Once you take the Social Welfare Research Seminar, you have your choice of topics for the advanced seminar. 
The topic may differ, depending on your academic concentration. Here is some assistance in making this choice:

General classes recommended for all students:

*Introduction to Research Databases: learn how to effectively search for articles using databases
Conducting Research Online : an overview of research resources that can be accessed from outside the libraries
Using EndNote: EndNote software helps organize sources and produce bibliographies

Recommended for direct practice students:

Library Resources for Evidence-Based Practice: learn how to find and evaluate research information for clinical social work practice

Recommended for MACRO students:

Introduction to Federal Public Policy Research: resources for finding the legal authority for polices, constructing a legislative history and evaluating federal public policies
Introduction to Westlaw Campus: how to find statutes, regulations, cases, and other legal information
Non-Profit Organizations: Information Sources: print, online and Internet sources for information regarding non-profit organizations

If you have other questions about this requirement, please contact Elaine Lasda Bergman, the library subject specialist for Social Welfare. She can be reached by email (elasdabergman@albany.edu) or phone 442-3695. You can register for a class by calling 442-3691, by stopping by the Reference Desk or use our online registration form

July 10, 2013

Career Resources for Social Work Students

It’s never too early to prepare yourself to enter the job market; get a head start by acquainting yourself with resources that can help you find a career in social work upon graduation.

Visit the Career and Education Resources section of our Social Welfare LibGuide; check out the section on professional development to access different professional organization sites with valuable career resources and job postings. Specific association job sites we recommend are the Clinical Social Work Association’s Job Board section and the National Association of Social WorkersSocial Work Career Center. If you want to stay local, check out NASW’s New York State Chapter.

Also, to help you prepare for the licensing exam, Dewey Library has three Reserve copies of: 
Study Guide: A Guide for Candidates Preparing for the ASWB Social Work Examination
Dewey Library / HV 11.5 S78X 2007
Two of these circulate for 2 days at a time, one is a 3-hour reserve item.

The following resources at the Dewey Library will help you find a career in social work:

Social Work in Health Care: Its Past and Future.
Dhooper, Surjit Singh.   Social work in health care :   its past and future /   Surjit Singh Dhooper.   Thousand Oaks, Calif. : SAGE, c2012.
Dewey Library / HV 687 D482 2012

Working in social work :   the real world guide to practice settings
Rosenberg, Jessica(Jessica Millet)   Working in social work :   the real world guide to practice settings /   Jessica Rosenberg ; foreword by Terry Mizrahi.   New York : Routledge, c2009.
Dewey Library / HV 10.5 R67 2009

Getting and finding social workers jobs :   the ultimate guide for job seekers and recruiters
Andrews, Brad.   Getting and finding social workers jobs :   the ultimate guide for job seekers and recruiters /   [Brad Andrews].   [Qld., Australia : Emereo Pty Ltd., 2009?]
Dewey Library / Reference: HV 10.5 A547X 2009


101 Careers in Social Work
.
Ritter, Jessica A.   101 careers in social work /   Jessica A. Ritter, Halaevalu F.O. Vakalahi, Mary Kiernan-Stern.   New York : Springer Pub. Co., c2009.
Dewey Library Reference / HV 10.5 R58 2009


Resumes for social service careers
Resumes for social service careers /   the editors of McGraw-Hill.   New York : McGraw-Hill, c2007.
Dewey Library / Reference: HV 10.5 V49 2007

Many paths, one purpose: Career paths for social work and human services majors. Many paths, one purpose :   career paths for social work and human services majors /   edited by Tuyen D. Nguyen.   Lanham, Md. : University Press of America, c2006.
Dewey Library / HV 10.5 M36X 2006


Social work career development: A handbook for job hunting and career planning
.
Doelling, Carol Nesslein.   Social work career development :   a handbook for job hunting and career planning /   by Carol Nesslein Doelling.   Washington, DC : NASW Press, [2004?]
Dewey Library / HV 10.5 D63 2004

 

If you have any questions on Social Work careers, please contact our Social Welfare bibliographer, Elaine Lasda Bergman by email at elasdabergman@albany.edu or phone at 442-3695

 

Blog post updated by Laurie Buckley 6/30/13
Blog post created by Kathryn Farrell

July 3, 2013

Pioneers in Social Work

Summer is a great time to do some professional reading that is not classwork oriented.  Are you curious about the people who contributed to the creation of the social welfare profession as it exists today? Read about some pioneering social workers below:

---
Jane Addams
(1860-1935), was the 1931 Nobel Peace Prize recipient who established Hull House and the American settlement house movement in 1889 on Chicago’s Westside.  Settlement houses were meant to rectify gross injustices in the availability of opportunities to different social classes; Addams lived among the people she helped and sought innovative ways to better understand how to help the less fortunate.  Without the efforts of Jane Addams, Social Work would not be the same.

To start, check out:
Knight, Louise W. Jane Addams : Spirit In Action / Louise W. Knight. n.p.: New York : W.W. Norton, c2010., 2010. Dewey Library / HV 28 A35 K65 2010

---

Frances Perkins (1880 - 1965) witnessed the Triangle Shirtwaiste Company fire of 1911, and fought tirelessly for labor reform.  She was the first woman to serve on the New York State Industrial Commission; by the time she was appointed Secretary of Labor by F.D.R., she was able to bring three decades of experience in social reform to the position.  In office, she fought for a minimum wage law, and helped draft the National Labor Relations Act, the Fair Labor Standards Act, & the Social Security Act.  Perkins was the first female Presidential Cabinet member, and was also the first woman to enter the Presidential line of succession.  She was inducted into both the Women's Hall of Fame and the Labor Hall of Fame; in 1980 the Department of Labor’s Headquarters were named after her.

Check out:
Downey, Kirstin. The Woman Behind The New Deal : The Life And Legacy Of Frances Perkins, Social Security, Unemployment Insurance, And The Minimum Wage / Kirstin Downey. n.p.: New York : Anchor Books, 2010., 2010. University Library / HD 8073 P38 D69X 2010

---

Eugene Kinckle Jones (1885-1954) became the first Executive Secretary of the National Urban League in 1918. The League, under his guidance, significantly expanded its campaign to help break the barriers keeping African Americans from employment at the time.  Jones implemented boycotts against racist companies with unfair practices, and pressured schools to offer equal vocational opportunities to children of all races.  In Washington, he fought for black workers to be considered assets to New Deal recovery programs, and for the desegregation of specific labor unions.  Jones was a member of F.D.R.’s Black Cabinet, an informal advisory group of African American, public policy experts.

Check out:
Armfield, Felix L. Eugene Kinckle Jones : The National Urban League And Black Social Work, 1910-1940 / Felix L. Armfield. n.p.: Urbana : University of Illinois Press, c2012., 2012. Dewey Library / HN 64 A76 2012

---

Grace and Edith Abbott were sisters-- both reformers born to civic-minded parents; Edith Abbott (1876-1957) was born first and throughout her career she emphasized the importance of public welfare administration and the need for a more humane social welfare system.  Edith Abbott helped establish the Cook County Bureau of Public Welfare in 1926, and assisted in drafting the Social Security Act of 1935.  She later became President of the National Conference of Social Work and the American Association of Schools of Social Work.  A frequently published scholar, Edith helped to found the Social Service Review.  Her sister Grace Abbott (1878 - 1939) was a high school teacher and in 1908 she was appointed to serve on Chicago Immigrants' Protective League.  She wrote, lobbied, and testified before Congress in support of the rights of immigrants.  She also took responsibility for administering and enforcing the controversial Sheppard Towner Act, which ensured the establishment of healthcare for kids and prenatal women.  Like her sister, Grace was also instrumental in the passing of the Social Security Act.

Check out:
Costin, Lela B. Two Sisters For Social Justice : A Biography Of Grace And Edith Abbott / Lela B. Costin. n.p.: Urbana : University of Illinois Press, c1983., 1983 Dewey Library / HV 27 C67 1983

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Mary Ellen Richmond (1861-1928) delivered an historic speech at the 1897 National Conference of Charities and Correction, calling for schools to train professional social workers and for standardized professionalization of the profession.  Her most influential book, Social Diagnosis, was based on her lectures and wide range of interdisciplinary knowledge of history, law, logic, medical social work, psychology, and psychiatry.

Agnew, Elizabeth N. From Charity To Social Work : Mary E. Richmond And The Creation Of An American Profession / Elizabeth N. Agnew. n.p.: Urbana, [Ill.] : University of Illinois Press, c2004., 2004. Dewey Library / HV 40.32 R55 A36 2004

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Former UAlbany Professors Honored with the National Association of Social Workers Foundation Recognition Award:

Willliam J. Reid (1928 - 2003) was a professor here at the University of Albany , where he chaired the Social Welfare doctoral program beginning in 1985. He was a Social Work scholar and founding Editor of the NASW Press Journal of Social Work Research.   He was well-known for developing the task-centered practice model, which is widely used today as a basis for delivering, managing, & evaluating social work services.  He received many awards and much recognition throughout his career, including the NASW Presidential Award for Excellence in Research & the Distinguished Achievement Award from the Society for Social Work and Research.  Reid also authored or co-authored 14 books and more than 120 articles and book chapters.

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Max Siporin (1917 - 2010) was an Army veteran and font of knowledge of social policy.  Siporin earned his DSW from the University of Pittsburgh School of Social Work in 1959 and taught at various different campuses before spending the last twenty years of his active professional career at the School of Social Welfare here at SUNY Albany; he retired in 1989, but remained active in the field. He played a large, active role in the development of an MSW program at Texas Pan American University—which came to fruition in 2003 and honored Siporin with a Fund in his name. 

For more information on these and other pioneers in the field of Social Work, visit the National Association of Social Workers Foundation or contact our Social Welfare Bibliographer, Elaine Lasda Bergman

Blog created by Laurie Buckley
Website Consulted: http://www.naswfoundation.org/

More books about pioneers in social work: 

Continue reading "Pioneers in Social Work" »

June 3, 2013

Meet Your Library Subject Specialist: Elaine Lasda Bergman

Librarians at the Dewey Graduate Library are a friendly bunch with expertise about library research that they are happy to share. For the next few weeks we will offer the opportunity for you to get to know your subject specialist through a brief question and answer session. The first subject specialist is Elaine Lasda Bergman.

elaine photos 002.jpg
What is your position in the Dewey Library?

My official title is the Bibliographer for Social Welfare, Gerontology, and Dewey Reference. This means I am the liaison to the School of Social Welfare, which includes the Institute of Gerontology . In that capacity I order and keep track of the materials purchased in support of the social welfare and gerontology programs and research here on the downtown campus. In addition, I maintain our collection of reference books here at Dewey, which includes reference books on topics in all disciplines taught on the downtown campus. In addition to those responsibilities, I teach the Social Welfare Research Seminar and the Resources for Evidence Based Practice seminar 6-7 times per semester. Finally, I am responsible for oversight of this blog and other outreach efforts of the Dewey Library
.

What does a typical day look like for you in your position?

During the academic year, I spend a lot of time working with the social work students, teaching classes, answering student and faculty emails, working at the reference desk, and so forth. In addition, I assign research for blog posts to our student assistants and edit and upload the posts when they are complete. I also manage any special projects - for example, this semester we created a video tour of the Dewey Library which should be on YouTube very soon. Other time is spent working on online research guides and work for professional librarian associations. Summer is the time for research projects.


How do you choose which resources to acquire for the collection? How do you manage your collections budget?
I take a look at the School of Social Welfare’s Research Guide to learn the areas in which social welfare faculty are conducting their research. In addition, I pay keen attention to the topics about which the students are asking so I can make sure our collection of books reflects their interest too. In addition, I scan an ordering database, oodles and oodles of book reviews, and publisher catalogs. Some purchases are “no-brainers,” affordable and on a relevant, and timely topic. I manage the budget by limiting purchases of textbooks, and saving information on items of interest all year but placing orders over the several months of our ordering period - usually August or so, through March in a given year.

What is typically included in the library seminars you teach?

I have recently switched to a hands-on , team or group based technique for helping students understand where to find the best articles and books for their topic as well as how to evaluate the information they find for quality and accuracy. This has been very successful and the students seem to get a better handle on how to locate journal articles, determine the scholarly nature of a document, find books and evaluate web documents for quality, validity and authority.

How do you manage your time and competing priorities? Do you use any tools or technology to keep yourself organized and on track?

I do certainly have competing priorities and many responsibilities, just like the rest of the librarians at the University Libraries. Luckily, I am fairly organized while still maintaining enough flexibility if something changes. As far as technology goes, every night before I leave work, I make a to-do list for the next day. I use Workflowy www.workflowy.com to manage both short-term and long-term to-do lists. I also am extremely diligent about putting appointments, classes, meetings, into my Outlook Calendar and blocking off time for in-depth projects when needed.

What is the most rewarding part of being a librarian? What is most challenging?

Far and away the most rewarding part of being a librarian is seeing that ‘ah-ha!’ moment in a student’s eyes, when they finally “get” how to locate the resources they need from the library. Also, because I work with social welfare students, I get to work with many individuals who are passionate about helping people - someone once told me that the help I gave him could lead someday to reducing the abuse rate of disabled children. Knowing that the students I work with are someday going out there in the field and working to better the lives of others is inspiring, and I am proud to be able to help them reach their goals.
The challenging parts are always about money. Budget cuts lead to reduced staff and less money for resources. We have been very good at “doing more with less,” but this remains an eternal struggle on a campus such as ours. Luckily, the people I work with, be they the other librarians, faculty, staff or students are all great and make the challenges worth the effort.

If you would like to contact Elaine Lasda Bergman please email her at elasdabergman@albany.edu or call 442-3695.

May 31, 2013

Social Welfare Research Seminar Summer Sessions

Advanced Standing social welfare students: the first of the required library seminars are offered through most of June. Here is the schedule:
  • Monday June 3, 10:30AM
  • Wednesday June 5, 10:30AM
  • Monday June 17, 10:30AM
  • Wednesday June, 19 9:30AM
  • Monday June 23, 10:00AM
  • Wednesday June 26, 10:00AM
  • Monday July 1, 10:30AM
  • Wednesday July 3, 10:30AM
To register, drop by the Dewey Library Reference Desk, Call 442-3691, or register online. If you have questions about the library requirements for social welfare students, please contact Elaine Lasda Bergman, the library's social welfare subject specialist, elasdabergman@albany.edu.

May 14, 2013

Social Work Licensure Information

In New York State in order to become a “Licensed Master Social Worker” you must meet the age, education, training, and examination requirements. With graduation fast approaching many social welfare students may be preparing themselves for the examination portion of the licensure process. The licensing exam is administered by the Association of Social Work Boards (ASWB). Luckily there are a lot of resources to help you prepare!

NYSED.gov has a LMSW License Requirements page that explains the general requirements, fees, and other practical information. In order to take the examination, Forms 1 and 2 must be completed, a fee of $294 must be paid to the New York State Education Department, education and application materials must be approved.

To actually take the exam you must register directly with the ASWB. The ASWB provides information on the content of the exam and it is possible to purchase exam study guides, online practice exams, and group review practice exams . The New York State Chapter of the National Association of Social Workers also has information on the licensing exam. Their YouTube channel has four videos on social work licensure and practice in New York.

The University at Albany’s School of Social Welfare (SSW) regularly invites the NYSED Secretary for the State Board to SSW to present directly to students on licensing requirements. Information on these presentations can be found on the MSW listserv and in the SSW Student Lounge (Richardson 003). There are also several resources available at the Dewey Library to help you prepare for the exam.

Check out the following items!
Masters social work licensing examination: Study guide. Association of Social Work Boards. Culpeper, VA: ASWB, c2010.
Dewey Library Reserves HV 40.52 M37X 2010. Please note that this is a 72 hour loan.

This is your passbook for social worker: Test preparation study guide: Questions & answers. Syosset, N.Y.: National Learning Corp., c2009.
Dewey Library Reserves HV 11.5 T55X 2009. Please note that this is a 72 hour loan.

Study guide: A guide for candidates preparing for the ASWB social work examination. Association of Social Work Boards. Culpeper, VA: ASWB, c2007.
Dewey Library Reserves HV 11.5 S78X 2007. There are three copies of this material. One is a three hour loan and the other two loan for 48 hours.

If you need more help locating resources on the licensing exam please contact our social welfare bibliographer Elaine Lasda Bergman by phone at 442-3695 or email: elasdabergman@albany.edu.

Blog post created by Kathryn Farrell

April 23, 2013

Check out the New Social Welfare Guide: Locating Tests and Measures!

If you are a social welfare student, chances are you will need to find tests and measures. Sound confusing? Luckily, there is now a library guide that will tell you all you need to know!

Locating Tests and Measures provides tips, information on searching in the databases, and useful print and online resources.

The TIPS section of the guide will help you search for tests and measures by topic or by specific name. This section also provides information on tests and measures that can be found on the internet.

The database searching section will help you search for tests and measures in Mental Measures Yearbook , PsycINFO, ERIC, CINAHL, and Dissertations and Theses .

The final section, Books and Websites provides selected books and websites with tests and measures.

Still have questions? Please contact our social welfare bibliographer Elaine Lasda Bergman by phone at 442-3695 or email .

Blog post created by Kathryn Farrell

April 2, 2013

SSW Lecturer and SOGI Director Lev Wins Award

arlene lev award.jpgWe would like to congratulate School of Social Welfare lecturer, Arlene Lev, on receiving the Innovative Contribution to Family Therapy Award from the American Family Therapy Academy. This award recognizes innovative contributions to family therapy theory and practice. Recipients are pioneers in the field who enhance clinical approaches, social action efforts.

Professor Lev has been a lecturer at the University of Albany for 25 years, and of late is the Project Director for The Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity (SOGI) Project here on campus. This innovative project enhances competencies for social work students who are entering into clinical practice with LGBTQ clients and their families, and at the same time promotes LGBTQ education and access for any student at UAlbany interested in the field. This project includes the development of specialized coursework and field placements for social work students in partnership with the Pride Center of the Capital Region .

Professor Lev’s innovative work has been acknowledged through the receipt of many campus awards as well, including:

• Departmental Diversity Award, for the School of Social Welfare, University at Albany for the Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Project, Lavender Graduation, 2011.
• Unsung Hero Award from the University at Albany, Lavender Graduation, 2010.
• Community Service Award, Capital District Gay and Lesbian Community Council, 2010.

You can find Professor Lev’s publications at the Dewey Library!

The complete lesbian & gay parenting guide. Arlene Istar Lev. New York: Berkley Books, c2004.
Dewey Library HQ 75.28 U6 L48 2004

Transgender emergence: Therapeutic guidelines for working with gender-variant people and their families. Arlene Istar Lev. New York: The Haworth Clinical Practice Press, c2004.
Dewey Library RC 560 G45 L48 2004

Professor Lev also has written chapters in these books at the Dewey Library:

LGBT-parent families : innovations in research and implications for practice. Abbie E. Goldberg, Katherine R. Allen, editors. New York:Springer, c2013.
Dewey Library HQ 75.27 L43X 2013

Handbook of LGBT-affirmative couple and family therapy. Jerry J. Bigner, Joseph L. Wetchler,editors. NY: Taylor and Francis, c2012.
Dewey Library RC 488.5 H3345 2012

Encyclopedia of domestic violence. Nicky Ali Jackson, editor.NY:Routledge, c2007.
Dewey Library Reference: HV 6626 E534 2007

Sexual orientation and gender expression in social work practice : working with gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people. edited by Deana F. Morrow and Lori Messinger. NY: Columbia UP, c2006.
Dewey Library HV 1449 S49 2006

There are also many of Professor Lev’s articles available through our databases, here are a selection:

Rachlin, K. & Lev, A.I. (2011). Challenging Cases for Experienced Therapists Journal of Gay & Lesbian Mental Health, 15:180-199.

Lev, A., Winters, K., Alie, L., Ansara, Y., Deutsch, M., Dickey, L., Ehrbar, R., Ehrensaft, D., Green, J., Meier, S., Richmond, K., Samons, S., Susset, F., (2010). “Response to Proposed DSM-5 Diagnostic Criteria,” Professionals Concerned with Gender Diagnoses in the DSM.

Lev, A.I. (2010). How queer - the development of gender identity and sexual orientation in LGBTQ-headed families. Family Process, 49 (2), 268-290.

Lev, A.I. (2009). The ten tasks of the mental health provider: Recommendations for revision of the World Professional Association for Transgender Health's Standards of Care. International Journal of Transgenderism, 11 (2), 74-99.

If you see Professor Lev, congratulate her on receiving the prestigious Innovative Contribution to Family Therapy Award!


Blog post created by Kathryn Farrell and Elaine Lasda Bergman

March 6, 2013

Celebrate Social Work Month 2013!


March is Social Work Month [] and this year’s theme is “Weaving Threads of Resilience and Advocacy.” In celebration of Social Work Month, the Dewey Library display is based on this year’s theme. Materials relating to advocacy and resilience are showcased and available for check out. There is also a handout with relevant books, websites, and journals that you can take with you.

Social Work Month has been celebrated every March since 1965 with a different theme every year. Since its inception, its goal has been to celebrate the profession and be a voice for all social workers. Show your support and stop by the display which is located by the front entrance of the Dewey Library!

Blog post created by Kathryn Farrell

February 26, 2013

New Guide to Assist with Evidence Based Practice in Social Work


Heirarchy.gifWe are pleased to announce a great new resource for Social Welfare students: the Evidence Based Social Work Practice LibGuide! Bibliographer Elaine Lasda Bergman has pulled together resources from the Libraries’ collection and the internet to help you understand and implement evidence based practice.

Using the best evidence to determine appropriate treatments, interventions, and social care is a critical skill for social work students and those in the field. In addition, completing social welfare research assignments here at UAlbany often requires a student to locate and evaluate evidence based research and make assessments about the validity and efficacy of treatments and interventions based on evaluating published research. This guide helps provide users with an understanding of basic precepts about evidence based practice, how to locate evidence, and how to evaluate research for quality and validity.

To get you started, the guide highlights the “Hierarchy of Evidence” to help you understand and evaluate research done by others as well as design your own study. The “Basic Resources” tab has a list of both print and online reference resources that will help you understand research methodology and medical and psychological terminology, including Dictionary of Statistics and Methodology and SAGE Handbook of Mixed Methods in Social and Behavioral Research.

Need help finding journal articles for your project or paper? Check out the “PsycInfo Search Tips” tab for information on performing effective searches in the PsycInfo database. This page covers issues such as how to use the database thesaurus and searching by methodology type. The guide also has a page listing free web resources, including search engines like SUMsearch and Trip Database, research clearinghouses and practice guidelines from organizations like the National Association of Social Workers and the American Psychiatric Association.

The guide’s “Evaluating the Evidence” tab has a list of critical appraisal tools to help you evaluate a research study, a key part of evidence based practice. Covering both general and subject specific tools from leading journals and websites, this tab is an essential resource for practitioners.

For more information on this guide and evidence based social work practice, contact Elaine Lasda Bergman (442-3695; elasdabergman@albany.edu) or stop by the reference desk.

Blog post created by Cary Gould

November 20, 2012

Faculty Profile - Social Welfare

The Dewey Library would like to congratulate Dr. Philip McCallion on being unanimously selected to receive the AGE-SW Career Achievement Award for his work in gerontology! This award is given annually to a faculty member with outstanding career achievements in social work education and aging. The award will be presented to Dr. McCallion at the Gerontological Society of America meeting in mid-November.

Dr. McCallion is a professor in the School of Social Welfare and is director of UAlbany’s Center for Excellence in Aging Services. His research is focused on caregiving issues and has been supported by grants and awards from a number of organizations including the U.S. Administration on Aging, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, and the John A. Hartford Foundation. Dr.McCallion has over 70 publications and many can be found at the Dewey Library!

Books:
Social work practice research for the twenty-first century. Edited by Anne E. Fortune, Philip McCallion, and Katharine Briar-Lawson. New York: Columbia University Press, 2010.
Dewey Library HV 11 S5886 2010

Total quality management in the social services: theory and practice
. Edited by Burton Gummer and Philip McCallion. [Albany, N.Y.]: Professional Development Program of Rockefeller College, 1995.
Dewey Library HD 62.15 T785X 1995

Articles:
Dennis, C., McCallion, P., & Ferretti, L. (2012) Understanding implementation of best practices for working with the older homeless through the lens of Self-Determination Theory. Journal of Gerontological Social Work. 55(4), 352-366.
Online / Periodical: HQ 1060 J58X WWW

Chao, S., McCallion, P., & Nickle, T. (2011). Factorial Validity and Consistency of the Maslach Burnout Inventory among Staff Working with Persons with Intellectual Disability and Dementia. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research. (55)5, 529-536.
Online / Periodical: RC 321 J78 WWW

Mezey, M., Mitty, E., Cortes, T., Burger, S., Clark, E., & McCallion, P. (2011). Education and Training: A Competency-Based Approach to Developing the Elder Care Workforce. Generations, 34(4), 53-60.
Online / Periodical: HQ 1060 G355 WWW

Easterly, L., & McCallion, P. (2010). Applying Corporate Citizenship Theory to the Operation of Affirmative Businesses. Journal of Policy and Practice in Intellectual Disabilities (7)4, 261-268.
Online / Periodical: HV 3004 J68X WWW

More publications by Dr. McCallion can be found in Minerva and our databases. If you have any questions, please stop by the reference desk, email us [], or call 442-3691. And if you see Dr. McCallion, congratulate him on his outstanding achievement!


Blog post created by Kathryn Farrell

November 6, 2012

Options for the Social Welfare Research Seminar

So, it is the middle of the semester and you have contacted the library to register for the Social Welfare Research Seminar, only to learn that the remaining sessions are all at capacity and closed to new registrants. Luckily, the Dewey Library offers a few options for MSW students who must take this required seminar.

1) You can request that the library offer an additional session of the Social Welfare Research Seminar. Contact Elaine Lasda Bergman (elasdabergman@albany.edu), the Social Welfare librarian, and work out a mutually available date and time. You must provide the email addresses of four people who can absolutely, positively guarantee that they will show up for the class. You can request that the class be scheduled during the evening or on the weekend if need be.

2) There is an online version of the class, but to complete it you must pass 6 quizzes and a longer assignment to get credit. The class is accessible through the Blackboard learning system. Please contact Elaine Lasda Bergman (elasdabergman@albany.edu)to get set up with access to the online workshop.

3) If you are not graduating in December, you can take the workshop in the spring. The spring schedule will come out in mid-January. Keep checking this blog to see when it is available. For your convenience you can register online as well as by phone (518) 442-3691, or in person at the reference desk.

If you have any questions about the Social Welfare Research Seminar or other library workshops and seminars, please contact the Dewey Reference Desk at 442-3691 or dewclass@albany.edu.

October 16, 2012

Faculty Profile: Ricky Fortune

Ricky_Fortune_inside.jpgAnne (Ricky) Fortune, Ph.D. is a professor and Associate Dean for the School of Social Welfare. She teaches at both the undergraduate and graduate levels, focusing her research on task-centered practice, termination of social work treatment, aging, and the field education.

The Dewey Library has several books authored and edited by Dr. Fortune. Check out any of the following books if you’d like to learn more about Dr. Fortune’s research!

Social work practice research for the twenty-first century. Edited by Anne E. Fortune, Philip McCallion, and Katharine Briar-Lawson. New York: Columbia University Press, 2010. Dewey Library HV 11 S5886 2010
This volume builds on the research of William J. Reid who changed how social work research was conducted. Focusing on empirical research and Evidence-Based Practice models, this volume provides up-to-date information on current social work research methods.

Aging and social work: the changing landscapes. Edited by Sharon M. Keigher, Anne E. Fortune, and Stanley L Witkin. Washington, D.C.: NASW Press, c2000. Dewey Library HV 1451 A32 2000
With 31 articles on social work research and the aging, this volume uses the United Nations Principles for Older Persons to address the issues in the social work profession.

Research in social work
. Anne E. Fortune, William J. Reid. New York: Columbia University Press, 1999.
Dewey Library HV 11 F678 1999
This book provides broad coverage of research in social work and can be used in many social welfare classes.

Task strategies: an empirical approach to clinical social work. William J. Reid; with contributions by Julie S. Abramson, Anne E. Fortune, Norma Wasko. New York: Columbia University Press, 1992. Dewey Library HV 43 R383 1992
Social work intervention strategies are detailed in this volume.

Task-centered practice with families and groups
. Anne E. Fortune with contributors. New York: Springer Pub. Co., c1985. Dewey Library HV 45 T37 1985

Dr. Fortune is the past editor of The Journal of Social Work Education. This is a refereed professional journal focusing on education in social work and social welfare. Trends and issues at all levels of social work education are published in peer-reviewed articles.

Dr. Fortune is the current editor of Social Work Research, a professional journal with primary research articles in social work and social welfare. This is a highly regarded journal in the field.

If you have questions about the social welfare resources at the Dewey Library, please contact our social welfare bibliographer Elaine Lasda Bergman by email or phone at 442-3695.

September 11, 2012

Faculty Profile: Katharine H. Briar-Lawson, Dean and Professor, School of Social Welfare

Briar-Lawson.jpgKatharine Briar-Lawson is dean and professor in UAlbany’s School of Social Welfare. She is a national expert on family focused practice and child and family policy. She co-chairs the Gerontological Task Force for the National Association for Deans and Directors and served as a past president. In addition, she is a Co-PI of the National Child Welfare Workforce Institute. Her research interests include child and family welfare, poverty and unemployment, community collaboration, and service integration. She has written and edited several books that are in the Libraries’ collection, including:

Globalization, Social Justice, and the Helping Professions
, edited by William Roth and Katharine Briar-Lawson. Albany: State University of New York Press, c2011. Dewey Library / HM 831 G56 2011.

Social Work Practice Research for the Twenty-First Century, edited by Anne E. Fortune, Philip McCallion, and Katharine Briar-Lawson. New York: Columbia University Press, 2010. Dewey Library / HV 11 S5886 2010

Charting the Impacts of University-Child Welfare Collaboration, edited by Katharine Briar-Lawson and Joan Levy Zlotnik. New York: Haworth Social Work Practice Press, c2003. Dewey Library / HV 715 C48 2003.

Evaluation Research in Child Welfare: Improving Outcomes through University-Public Agency Partnerships, edited by Katharine Briar-Lawson, Joan Levy Zlotnik. New York: Haworth Press, c2002. Dewey Library / HV 713 E83 2002.

Family-Centered Policies and Practices: International Implications, by Katharine Briar-Lawson, Charles B. Hennon, Hal A. Lawson and Alan R. Jones. New York: Columbia University Press, c2001. Dewey Library / HV 697 F353 2001.

Innovative Practices with Vulnerable Children and Families, edited by Alvin L. Sallee, Hal A. Lawson and Katharine Briar-Lawson. Peosta, Iowa: Eddie Bowers Pub., c2001. Dewey Library / HV 699 I49 2001.

Social Work and the Unemployed, by Katharine H. Briar. Silver Spring, MD: National Association of Social Workers, c1988. Dewey Library / HV 699 B73 1988.

The Effect of Long-Term Unemployment on Workers and Their Families, by Katharine H. Briar. San Francisco: R & E Research Associates, 1978. Storage - CCBED / HD 5726 S485 B73.

In addition, Briar-Lawson has authored numerous scholarly articles that can also be found at the Libraries:

Child Welfare, the Media, and Capacity Building ,”by Briar-Lawson, Katharine, Kelly Martinson, Jen Briar-Bonpane, and Kathryn Zox. Journal of Public Child Welfare, 5.2/3 (2011): 185-199. doi:10.1080/15548732.2011.566754.

A Qualitative Examination of Power between Child Welfare Workers and Parents,” by Kimberly Bundy-Fazioli, Katharine Briar-Lawson and Eric R. Hardiman. The British Journal of Social Work 39.8 (2009): 1447-1464. doi: 10.1093/bjsw/bcn038.

Child Welfare Design Teams: An Intervention to Improve Workforce Retention and Facilitate Organizational Development,” by James C. Caringi, Jessica Strolin-Goltzman, Hal A. Lawson, Mary McCarthy, Katharine Briar-Lawson, et al. Research on Social Work Practice 18.6 (2008): 565-574. doi: 10.1177/1049731507309837.

Exploring Strategies to Advance Public-Sector Funding in Geriatric Social Work Education,” by Gary Behrman, Michael Mancini, Katharine Briar-Lawson, Victoria M. Rizzo, Frank Baskind, et al. Journal of Social Work Education 42.1 (2006): 37-48.

Charting the Impacts of University-Child Welfare Collaboration, ” by Nancy S. Dickinson and Katharine Briar-Lawson. Children and Youth Services Review 27.5 (2005): 567-569.

Family-Centered Policies and Practices: International Implications,” by Mary Hood and Katharine Briar-Lawson. Australian Social Work 54.4 (2001): 97-98.

Capacity Building for Integrated Family-Centered Practice,” by Katharine Briar-Lawson. Social Work 43.6 (1998): 539-550.

School-Linked Comprehensive Services: Promising Beginnings, Lessons Learned, and Future Challenges ,” by Katharine Briar-Lawson, Hal A. Lawson, Connie Collier and Alfred Joseph. Social Work in Education 19.3 (1997): 136-148.

For more information on these and other resources in social welfare, contact subject specialist Elaine Lasda Bergman at 442-3695 or elasdabergman@albany.edu.

Blog post created by Cary Gouldin

June 18, 2012

Social Welfare Summer Reading

Summer Reading List: Social Welfare


With the first day of summer just around the corner, it’s time to kick back and relax at the beach with a good book. The Dewey Library’s social welfare collection is chock-full of fascinating and thought-provoking books that are perfect for beach reading. Why not intersperse a few among the who-done-its, vampire romances and literary classics that make up your summer reading list? Here are a few suggestions to get you started:

Call to Social Work-1.jpgThe Call to Social Work: Life Stories by Craig Winston LeCroy. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE, c2012. Dewey Library / HV 40 L38 2012.

This collection of stories by social workers working in various parts of the field offers a useful overview of the field as a whole and gives the reader insight into the issues and concerns that those working in the field face on a day to day basis. It can be a valuable resource in selecting a career path within the profession.


The Home: A Memoir of Growing Up in an Orphanage by Richard McKenzie. New York: Basic Books, c1996. Dewey Library / HV 990 N8 M35 1996.

Richard McKenzie was 10 years old when he and his brother were dropped off at an orphanage in North Carolina. Their mother had committed suicide and their alcoholic and abusive father could not care for them. The Home, as everyone called it, provided the children with the stability they needed to build character and self-respect. Some were orphans, but most were victims of poverty and neglect, and the home provided them with a safe shelter. McKenzie stayed until he finished high school and went on to college, as did most of the orphans. He is a professor of economics and the author of twenty-five books. Remarkably most of his friends at The Home have had similar successes. Today, our foster care system is strained beyond capacity; countless children languish in broken families with insufficient means. McKenzie shines a refreshing clear light on the ongoing debate about the proper fate of these children. His story reminds us that institutional care can be the best choice for children trapped in horrible circumstances.


Chasing the High.jpgChasing the High: A Firsthand Account of One Young Person’s Experience with Substance Abuse by Kyle Keegan, with Howard B. Moss. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, c2008. Dewey Library / HV 5805 K42 A3 2008.

This memoir traces Kyle Keegan’s descent from teenage experimentation with drugs and alcohol to an overpowering addiction to heroin that led him to homelessness and a life of crime. Drawing on these experiences, he offers guidance to other teens who may be struggling with addiction. Keegan, with help from psychiatrist Howard Moss, MD, goes on to discuss the neurobiology of addiction in teens, how to get help, treatment options and how to talk to friends and family members about addiction. Written specifically for young adults, this book is both moving memoir and how to manual for seeking help.

Hands to Work: Three Women Navigate the New World of Welfare Deadlines and Work Rules by LynNell Hancock. New York: HarperCollins Publishers, 2003. Dewey Library / HV 99 N59 H36 2002.

In this examination of national welfare policy, reporter and writer LynNell Hancock offers an intimate and heart-wrenching portrait of three women and their families as they struggle to find their way through the new rules and regulations of the public assistance system. Hands to Work takes the reader on a journey within the day-to-day struggles of these women, describing their hopes, regrets, and deepest dreams. Hancock demystifies contemporary misconceptions of poverty and illustrates how welfare policy and reform have been conceived, offering a thought-provoking look at the most divisive questions about America's neediest citizens.

Cover.Committed.PB-1.jpgCommitted: A Skeptic Makes Peace with Marriage by Elizabeth Gilbert. New York: Viking, 2010. Dewey Library / HQ 834 G48 2010.

Having sworn off marriage in the wake of a painful divorce, author Elizabeth Gilbert is shocked to learn that the only way her Brazilian boyfriend can live with her in the States is for them to marry. In an effort to reconcile herself to this necessity, she embarks on a year-long examination of the history, meaning and cultural variations of marriage in the US and Southeast Asia.


Rachel and her Children: Homeless Families in America
by Jonathan Kozol. New York: Crown Publishers, 1988. Dewey Library / HV 4505 K69 1988.

Based on the months the author spent among America’s homeless, Rachel and Her Children is an unforgettable record of the desperate voices of men, women, and especially children caught up in a nightmarish situation that tears at the hearts of readers. With record numbers of homeless children and adults flooding the nation’s shelters, Rachel and Her Children offers a look at homelessness that resonates even louder today.

Eugene Knickle Jones-1.jpgEugene Kinckle Jones: The National Urban League and Black Social Work, 1910-1940 by Felix L. Armfield. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, c2012. Dewey Library / HN 64 A76 2012.

One of the leading African American intellectuals of the early 20th Century, Eugene Knickle Jones, as executive director of the National Urban League, was a tireless advocate against racial discrimination and was instrumental in professionalizing black social work in America. He campaigned for equal hiring practices, inclusion of African Americans in labor unions, vocational training for blacks and social workers from the black community. Drawing from the papers of Jones’ family, associates and the National Urban League, this book examines his legacy and its effects on the social welfare profession.

Myth of the Welfare Queen: A Pulitzer Prize-Winning Journalist’s Portrait of Women on the Line by David Zucchino. New York: Scribner, c1997. Dewey Library / HV 91 Z85 1997.

Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter David Zucchino spent a year sharing the lives of Odessa Williams and Cheri Honkala -- two "welfare mothers" in Philadelphia -- to gain an intimate look at their day-to-day existence. Odessa, supporting an extended family, exhibits almost superhuman strength and resolve. Cheri, a single mother, is a tireless advocate for the homeless. Zucchino beautifully portrays them as figures of profound courage and quiet perseverance, systematically shattering all misconceptions and stereotypes about these women and so many others like them.


Jane Addams-1.jpg

Jane Addams: Spirit in Action by Louise W. Knight. New York: W.W. Norton, c2010. Dewey Library / HV 28 A35 K65 2010.

Jane Addams (1860-1935) was a leading statesperson in an era when few imagined such possibilities for women. In this fresh interpretation, Louise W. Knight shows Addams's boldness, creativity, and tenacity as she sought ways to put the ideals of democracy into action. Starting in Chicago as a co-founder of the nation's first settlement house, Hull House—a community center where people of all classes and ethnicities could gather—Addams became a grassroots organizer and a partner of trade unionists, women, immigrants, and African Americans seeking social justice. In time she emerged as a progressive political force; an advocate for women's suffrage; an advisor to presidents; a co-founder of civil rights organizations, including the NAACP; and a leader for international peace. Written as a fast-paced narrative, Jane Addams traces how one woman worked with others to make a difference in the world.


Nickel and Dimed: On (not) Getting by in America
by Barbara Ehrenreich. New York: Henry Holt & Co., c2008. University Library Reserves / HD 4918 E375 2008.

Millions of Americans work full time, year round, for poverty-level wages. In 1998, Barbara Ehrenreich decided to join them. She was inspired in part by the rhetoric surrounding welfare reform, which promised that a job - any job - can be the ticket to a better life. But how does anyone survive, let alone prosper, on $6 an hour? To find out, Ehrenreich left her home, took the cheapest lodgings she could find and accepted whatever jobs she was offered. Moving from Florida to Maine to Minnesota, she worked as a waitress, a hotel maid, a cleaning woman, a nursing-home aide, and a Wal-Mart sales clerk. She lived in trailer parks and crumbling residential motels. Very quickly, she discovered that no job is truly "unskilled," that even the lowliest occupations require exhausting mental and muscular effort. She also learned that one job is not enough; you need at least two if you intend to live indoors. Nickel and Dimed reveals low-rent America in all its tenacity, anxiety, and surprising generosity - a land of Big Boxes, fast food, and a thousand desperate stratagems for survival.

Lifting Our Voices.jpgLifting our Voices: The Journeys into Family Caregiving of Professional Social Workers edited by Joyce O. Beckett. New York: Columbia University Press, c2008. Dewey Library / HV 40.3 L49 2008.

Lifting Our Voices explores the dual roles of professional social workers who are also family caregivers. After discussing the relevant literature, Lifting Our Voices vividly and sensitively presents the caregiving experiences of ten professional social workers. Using professional and theoretical knowledge and skills, each contributor draws implications for various levels of social work and human service interventions. These poignant descriptions and analyses recount both the frustrations and barriers of negotiating social service agencies and other institutions and the joys and triumphs of family caregiving. Lifting Our Voices frankly discusses how a professional education either prepares or fails to equip an individual with the skills for successful intervention on behalf of a loved one. Contributors hail from rich and varied backgrounds, revealing the importance of age, ethnicity, gender, marital status, and gerontological expertise in the practice of family caregiving.

These essays explore situations rarely reported on in the literature, such as caregivers and care recipients who represent the lifespan from preschool to retirement. Lifting Our Voices graphically describes types of caregiving that are seldom discussed, including simultaneous caregiving to multiple family members and reciprocal and sequential caregiving, thus broadening and refining the very concepts of "caregiving" and "family."

Ordinary Resurrections: Children in the Years of Hope by Jonathan Kozol. New York: Crown Publishers, c2000. University Library / HQ 792 U5 K69 2000.

Education advocate Jonathan Kozol returns to the South Bronx neighborhood of Mott Haven, the subject of two previous books, to spend another four years with the children of one of the poorest sections of New York City. A fascinating narrative of daily urban life seen through the eyes of children, Ordinary Resurrections gives the human face to Northern segregation and provides a stirring testimony to the courage and resilience of the young.


Tender Mercies: Inside the World of a Child Abuse Investigator
by Keith N. Richards. Washington, D.C.: CWLA Press, c1998. Dewey Library / HV 40.32 R53 A3 1998.

This first-person, emotional account of a child protection service worker in New York State gives the reader an intimate look at all aspects of handling child abuse cases: interviewing parents who have been accused of abusing their children, talking to abused children removed from their parents' guardianship, working with an uncaring system ironically designed with the best of intentions, and keeping up with the mounds of paperwork each case generates. Lucid and disturbing, eloquent and passionate, Tender Mercies is a must-read for professionals and laypeople alike.

Unhitched: Love, Marriage, and Family Values from West Hollywood to Western China
by Judith Stacey. New York: New York University Press, c2011. Dewey Library / HQ 75.27 S73 2011.

Built on bracing original research that spans gay men’s intimacies and parenting in this country to plural and non-marital forms of family in South Africa and China, Unhitched decouples the taken for granted relationships between love, marriage, and parenthood. Countering the one-size-fits-all vision of family values, Stacey offers readers a lively, in-person introduction to these less familiar varieties of intimacy and family and to the social, political, and economic conditions that buttress and batter them. Through compelling stories of real families navigating inescapable personal and political trade-offs between desire and domesticity, the book undermines popular convictions about family, gender, and sexuality held on the left, right, and center.


Blog post created by Cary Gouldin

May 15, 2012

Career Resources for Social Work Students

If you’re a social welfare student, chances are you’ll be looking for jobs in the near future. Even if it’s your first semester, it’s never too early to see what resources can help you find a career in social work. In this post, we’ll talk about different avenues you can take when it comes to finding a job. The Dewey Library, professional associations, and other internet resources have information on different kinds of social work jobs, how to find a job, and actual job postings.

The following resources at the Dewey Library will help you find a career in social work:

101 Careers in Social Work. Jessica A. Ritter, Halaevalu F.O. Vakalahi, & Mary Kiernan-Stern. New York: Springer Pub. Co., c2009.
Dewey Library Reference HV 10.5 R58 2009

Many paths, one purpose: Career paths for social work and human services majors. Edited by Tuyen D. Nguyen. Lanham, Md.: University Press of America, c2006.
Dewey Library HV 10.5 M36X 2006

Social work career development: A handbook for job hunting and career planning
. Carol Nesslein Doelling. Washington, DC: NASW Press, [2004?]
Dewey Library HV 10.5 D63 2004

Careers in social work. Leon H. Ginsberg. Boston: Allyn and Bacon, c1998.
Dewey Library HV 10.5 G55 1998

To prepare for the licensing exam, you may want to use a study guide. The Dewey Library has three copies on reserve of Study Guide: A Guide for Candidates Preparing for the ASWB Social Work Examination. Ask for this at the circulation desk!

You may also want to check out the Career and Education Resources section of Getting Started in Social Welfare Research. From here, you can find more information on licensing and accreditation, job resources, and professional associations. You may also want to check out the section on professional development. Professional development and continuing education are vital aspects of being a social worker. This site connects you with valuable resources.

Professional associations are a great way to get your foot in the door and learn about job opportunities. The Clinical Social Work Association (CSWA) is a national social work organization. The Job Board section provides resources for both job seekers and employers.

The National Association of Social Workers is another professional association you will want to be familiar with. NASW is the largest member social work organization in the world. Here, you can learn about recent publications in the field, access information on professional development, and advocate for meaningful causes. Their Social Work Career Center lists current job openings. If you want to stay local, you will want to check out NASW’s New York State Chapter.

If you have any questions on social work careers, please contact our social welfare bibliographer, Elaine Lasda Bergman by email at elasdabergman@albany.edu or phone at 442-3695.

Blog post created by Kathryn Farrell

April 24, 2012

How to Make the Most of Your Social Work Field Placement

Your time here as a social welfare student involves attending class and participating in field placements. Field placements provide opportunities to work in the social work profession under the supervision of those experienced in the field. This is a valuable part of your education here at the University at Albany. To enhance your knowledge and experience regarding to field placements, the Dewey Library has several relevant books and journals. There are also many useful online sources relating to field placements in the social work profession.

Here at the Dewey Library you may want to check out:

In the field: a guide for the social work practicum. William A. Danowski. Boston: Pearson, c2012.
Dewey Library HV 11 D357 2012

Contemporary field social work: integrating field and classroom experience. Mark Doel, Steven M. Shardlow, & Paul G. Johnson. Thousand Oaks, Calif.: SAGE Publications, c2011.
Dewey Library HV 11 D635 2011

The practicum companion for social work: integrating class and field work. Julie Birkenmaier &Marla Berg-Weger. Boston, MA: Pearson A and B, c2007.
Dewey Library HV 11 B44 2007

Educational supervision in social work: a task-centered model for field instruction and staff development. Jonathan Caspi & William J. Reid. New York: Columbia University Press, c2002.
Dewey Library HV 11 C335 2002

The University Libraries also subscribes to journals that provide more information on field placement. These are all available online:

Journal of Social Work Education
Online / Periodical: HV 11 J664X WWW

Social Work Education
Online / Periodical: WWW

Journal of Teaching Social Work
Online / Periodical: HV 11 J664X WWW

In addition to online journal subscriptions, there are also several online sources:

Here at the University at Albany, you are required to complete two field placements. The School of Social Welfare has detailed information on field placementsfor MSW and BSW students. In addition you can learn details about the requirements you will need to fulfill while pursuing your social work degree.

For general information on field work placements, mswprograms.com is a good place to look. Here, you will understand the basics of field placement, general school requirements, and the differences between your first and second year placements.

The OCFS Graduate Student Training Program through the New York State Social Education Consortium provides field placement opportunities to social welfare students. Tuition support for those already working in child welfare services is available as well as stipends for interns.

The Office of Mental Health provides a list of evidence-based practice in mental health field placement sites in New York State. The sites listed are all EBP approved sites for field placement. This is a great resource for those of you interested in EBP and mental health.

Once you’ve graduated, you may want to become a licensed clinical social worker. The New York State Office of the Professions has information on how to obtain your clinical license. Keep this information stored away until you need it! It can be a confusing process but the Office of the Professions helps break down the information into something manageable.

If you have any more questions on field placement resources, please contact our social welfare bibliographer, Elaine Lasda Bergman by email at elasdabergman@albany.edu or phone at 442-3695.

Blog post created by Kathryn Farrell

March 27, 2012

Tricks for Locating Tests and Measures

If you're a social welfare student, you will eventually need to find tests, measures, and assessment scales. If you're not sure how to find these, this post is for you! Here we will discuss how to find tests and measurements in ERIC and PsycInfo as well as other relevant resources here at the library.

In ERIC, it is possible to limit to Tests/Questionnaires under Publication Type. This is one way to find tests and measurements but is not always consistent. The best way to find what you need is to enter your search terms in the search box and add append* in the second search box. This tells the database to search for different endings of the word such as append, appendix, and appended. Articles with appended tests will be found this way, and is the most accurate way to find tests and measurements in ERIC.

The interface is different, but the approach is similar in PsycInfo. It is possible under All Fields to limit to Tests & Measures but the best way is to search append* in addition to your own search terms (like in ERIC). For the best results, keep your search general. If you cannot find the full text version in PycInfo, click on the Find It button to see if it's available in another database. If not, you can check in Minerva to see if we have it available in print.

The Dewey Library also has extensive print holdings dealing with tests and measures. Here are a few of the newest texts owned by the library:

Handbook of child sexual abuse: identification, assessment, and treatment. Edited by Paris Goodyear-Brown. Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons, c2012.
Dewey Library

Handbook of multicultural measures
. Glenn C. Gamst, Christopher T.H. Liang, & Aghop Der-Karabetian. Thousand Oaks, Calif.: SAGE Publications, c2011.
Dewey Library HM 1271 G36 2011

Child & family assessment in social work practice. Sally Holland. London; Los Angeles, CA: SAGE, 2011.
Dewey Library

Handbook of psychological assessment. Gary Groth-Marnat. Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons, Inc., c2009.
Dewey Library BF 176 G76 2009

Tests: a comprehensive reference for assessments in psychology, education, and business. Edited by Taddy Maddox. Austin, Tex.: Pro-Ed, c2008.
Dewey Library Reference BF 176 T43 2008

Measures for clinical practice and research>. Joel Fischer, Kevin Corcoran. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, 2007.
Dewey Reference BF 176 C66 2007

Also check out the database Mental Measurements Yearbook with Tests in Print. This is an EBSCO database and has the same interface as ERIC. Our Test and Measurements section of Internet Resources in Social Welfare also has relevant information.

The University at Albany also has its own School of Education Test Library(from the Division of Educational Psychology and Methodology). This website lists tests, books, hours for the library and more. The Test Library is located in Education B-11 on the Uptown Campus.

If you have any questions about locating tests and measures, please contact Elaine Bergman, the Social Welfare bibliographer. She can be reached by email (elasdabergman@albany.edu) or by phone (442-3695).

Blog post created by Kathryn Farrell

February 28, 2012

The Debate on Social Work Research

Social work, like most academic professions, has a research component. However, many say that social work research is not rigorous enough and does not adhere to the same standards as other disciplines. Still, there are others that say there are efforts being made to improve the rigor of social work research. What do you think?

According to LeCroy in “Knowledge Building and Social Work Research: A Critical Perspective,� in order to build social work knowledge, a critical perspective must be applied. However, LeCroy does not believe that this perspective has been understood or applied in the field of social work, weakening social work research. In “Reflections and the Need for Social Work Research,� Howard states that there is a need for applied social work research but it is currently limited, limiting the quality of research. Pardeck and Meinert are also critics of social work research. In Lindsey’s article “Ensuring Standards in Social Work Research,� a study done by Pardeck and Meinert found that the journal Social Work had an inadequate peer-review process. Since Social Work is the profession’s main journal, this finding is unsettling for proponents of social work research.

There are those who find social work research inadequate, but others believe it is on the right track. Although Howard said that there is a need for more applied social work research, it is also stated in “Reflections and the Need for Social Work Research� that applied social work research is increasing in quality and quantity. In “Social Work Research: Debating the Boundaries,� McDermott states that there are three foci within social work research. “A focus on the individual in relation to the social, a commitment to social change, and a concern with the poor and oppressed,� are all prominent in today’s social work research and must remain so in order for the research to be effective. In a study done by Holosko in “What types of designs are we using in social work research and evaluation?� 329 social work articles from top journals were analyzed. It was found that social work research and evaluation is based on non-research studies. However, instead of this being a hindrance to the quality of research, Holosko states that researchers must better understand the context of social work research and stop “apologizing for the designs used, and how one can and should strengthen designs to offset concerns.� These arguments state that although social work research is different than other disciplines’ studies, it does not make it less rigorous, only different.

Do you agree with LeCroy, Howard, and Lindsey and think social work research is inadequate? Or do you think it has many valuable components and is unique because the profession is unique like Holosko and McDermott? Read the full articles available online through our databases:

Holosko, M.J. (2010). What types of designs are we using in social work research and evaluation?. Research on Social Work Practice, 20(6), 665-673.

Howard, M. (2009). Reflections and the need for social work research. Social Work Research, 33(1), 3-4.

Lindsey, D. (1999). Ensuring standards in social work research. Research on Social Work Practice, 9(1), 115-120.

McDermott, F. (1996). Social work research: debating the boundaries. Australian Social Work, 9(1), 5-10.

LeCroy, C. (2010). Knowledge building and social work research: a critical perspective. Research on Social Work Practice, 20(3), 321-324.

There are also several research methods materials available at the Dewey Library. Check out the following and form your own opinion on the standards of social work research:

Research and research methods for youth practitioners. Edited by Simon Bradford and Fin Cullen. New York: Routledge, 2012.
Dewey Library HV 1421 R458 2012 / New Books Display

Adventures in social research: data analysis using IBM SPSS statistics. Earl Babbie...[et al.]. Los Angeles: Pine Forge Press, c2011.
Dewey Library HA 32 A386X 2011

The handbook of social work research methods. Editor, Bruce Thyer. Los Angeles, CA: SAGE, c2010.
Dewey Library HV 11 H342 2010

Sage handbook of mixed methods in social & behavioral research
. Edited by Abbas Tashakkori & Charles Teddlie. Los Angeles: SAGE Publications, c2010.
Dewey Library Reference H 62 T244 2010

The SAGE handbook of applied social research methods
. Edited by Leonard Bickman & Debra J. Rog. Los Angeles : SAGE, c2009.
Dewey Library H 62 H24534 2009

The University Libraries also subscribe to many relevant journals. Check out Journal of Evidence-Based Social Work: Advances in Practice; Programming, Research, and Policy; Social Work Research; and Research on Social Work Practice. These journals all offer valuable and relevant material on social work research.

If you have any questions regarding social work research, please contact our social welfare bibliographer Elaine Lasda Bergman by phone at 442-3695 or email at elasdabergman@albany.edu.

January 24, 2012

Loan Forgiveness Programs for Social Workers

Many of you are finishing up your MSW programs this summer and are thinking about where to apply once you graduate. At the same time, you may be facing varying amounts of debt in the form of student loans that will need to be repaid upon graduation. Fortunately, there are some state and federal programs that offer loan forgiveness to social workers, usually for working in underserved locations or critical specialties. This is a great way to get a break on your loans while at the same time receiving some great work experience in the field.

NYS Licensed Social Worker Loan Forgiveness Program
The NYS Licensed Social Worker Loan Forgiveness Program offers assistance in paying back graduate school loans to licensed social workers working in critical human service areas in fields such as health, mental health, substance abuse, aging, HIV/AIDS and child welfare or in communities with multilingual needs. Qualifying social workers receive up to $26,000 in aid to be paid out in annual disbursements of up to $6,500. To be eligible for the program, you must be a U.S. citizen or qualifying non-citizen who has been a legal resident of New York State for at least one year and be professionally licensed to practice in the state. You must have an outstanding balance on an eligible student loan and have at least one year of full-time employment as a licensed social worker in a critical human service area. More information and the application can be found on the Higher Education Services Corporation website. Keep in mind the due date for applying for this program is March 15, 2012.

Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program
The Federal Department of Education offers forgiveness of qualifying federal loans to full-time employees of public service organizations. Public service organizations include all federal, state and local government organizations and agencies and a broad range of non-profit organizations. Under the terms of the program, you may qualify for forgiveness of the remaining balance of your loan after you have made 120 qualifying payments. Non-defaulted loans made under the Direct Loan Program are eligible for this program, including Federal Direct Stafford Loans, Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loans, Federal Direct PLUS Loans and Federal Direct Consolidation Loans. Loans made under other federal programs can qualify if they are consolidated under a Direct Consolidation Loan. More information and the steps to take in order to obtain this benefit can be found on the Federal Student Aid website.

National Health Services Corp Loan Repayment Program

The NHSC’s loan repayment program offers aid to primary medical, dental and mental and behavioral health providers working in communities in need. Participants commit to a two-year term of service at a NHSC-approved site, after which, they will receive a loan payment. Payment amounts are based on a site’s HPSA sore and the number of hours worked, among other things. After the initial two-year term has been completed, participants can apply to continue their service and receive additional loan payments. Qualified applicants must be licensed to practice in a NHSC-eligible discipline, work at a NHSC-approved site and have outstanding, qualifying educational loans. More information and NHSC-approved job posting can be found on the NHSC [http://nhsc.hrsa.gov/loanrepayment/index.html] website. The application period for this program runs from December 13, 2011 through May 15, 2012.

Blog post created by Cary Gouldin

December 20, 2011

Stay Up-To-Date with a Social Welfare Blog

For most students, Intersession is a time for recovering from finals and final projects, celebrating the holidays, and perhaps earning some extra money at work. However, the spring semester is just around the corner and it’s always a good idea over break to have some mental awareness of what is going on in your field of study. For social welfare students, following a couple of social welfare blogs will keep you up-to-date and alert on social welfare issues during your time off from classes.

Internet Resources in Social Welfare
is a great online resource for social welfare students. Here there are many useful links to online social welfare resources including some relevant blogs. An RSS feed on relevant blogs from the National Association of Social Workers is included on the General tab of Internet Resources in Social Welfare. This feed comes from the website Social Work Blog. Recent articles from social welfare blogs are featured on the feed and they change on a regular basis. From the Social Work Blog main page it is possible to search blogs by category such as advocacy, international social work, and practice and professional development.

In addition to the National Association of Social Workers, there are several other associations and organizations with valuable blogs. Alliance for Children and Families produces the blog The Social Innovators . This blog focuses on the Obama administration’s solutions on issues such as poverty and how they affect non-profit organizations.

Your Mind Your Body is a blog produced by the American Psychological Association. This blog offers insights on healthy living and behaviors. A list of social welfare associations is available on Internet Resources in Social Welfare.

Several schools with social welfare programs also produce relevant blogs. Check out the following:

School of Social Work blog: From the University of Michigan this blog posts information on job opportunities and scholarships.

Social Work Immigration Alliance
is a blog from the University of Washington that focuses on immigrant rights and reform. Students, faculty, and community members are contributors.

India Study Abroad Trip Blog: This blog highlights the experiences of social welfare students from the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill on a trip to India. Social differences are explored and documented.

MSW @ USC Blog: Produced by the University of Southern California, this blog has everything from writing tips, to information on elder abuse, to discussions on discrimination.

Social Work Library @ Boston College: This blog is produced by the library at Boston College and touches on current events in the profession.

There are also several individual social welfare students blogging about their experiences in the field:

The Fat Social Worker
:Michelle is a social work student at NYU whose objective is to address issues regarding fat identity and other social welfare matters.

Michigan Girl’s Café: “A graduate student’s reflections on academics, careers, and social justice.�

The Nudge Patrole: A social work student at UCLA, Laura writes about her experiences as a master’s student.

Also check out The Social Betterment Blog and its Top 50 Blogs by Social Work Professionalshttp://mastersofsocialwork.org/top-50-blogs-by-social-work-professionals.html. Other good resources for finding Social Work blogs include Social-work.org], MSWprograms.com], and Onlineschools.org].

To stay up-to-date on your favorite blogs you might want to subscribe to RSS feeds. What’s an RSS feed? An RSS feed allows you to receive the latest content from a website. It is possible to subscribe to the RSS feeds of many of the blogs mentioned. Whenever a new post is added, you will be alerted. The University at Albany has a brief explanation of RSS feeds and a list of feeds you can subscribe to at this institution.

If you have any further questions about social welfare blogs, please contact our social welfare bibliographer Elaine Lasda Bergman at ebergman@albany.edu or phone at 442-3695.

Blog post created by Katie Farrell

December 7, 2011

Library Help During the End of Semester

As another semester comes to a close it is again time to buckle down and begin to finish up all of your projects, and start to get ready for your finals. So don’t go it alone, the library can be helpful in all aspects of your end of semester school plans. From reference help, to document delivery, we have you covered. So don’t stress (even though it may seem impossible) and find out how the library can help you with projects and finals this semester.

As you begin to finish up end of the semester papers and projects there’s a good chance you will be doing some pretty in depth research. In that case make sure to check out the various ways to acquire those hard hitting articles and books that will be vital to your finals period. Don’t worry if there is an item at another library or even another campus. Our UA Delivery service allows you to request books from the uptown campus to be delivered to the Dewey Library, saving you a gas guzzling trip. Also, if we have a journal article that is only in print, you don't need to come to the library to photocopy it. Make a UA Delivery request for the article and we will scan the article and email it to you in PDF form. Beware procrastinators, if you make these requests late at night, they will be filled the next day!

Sometimes as the semester wraps up you need a little push in the right direction, in that case give our bibliographers a call and get a little help. If you feel you are having trouble or just need a good place to start these people are experts in their respective fields and can help you! They all have years of experience and trust me they are very nice people and are always willing to help. Here is the information for all of the subject bibliographers:

Elaine M. Lasda Bergman
Bibliographer for Dewey Reference, Social Welfare, and Gerontology
(518) 442-3695 (phone)
elasdabergman@albany.edu

Mary Jane Brustman
Bibliographer for Criminal Justice
(518)-442-3540
mbrustman@al;bany.edu

Deborah Bernnard
Bibliographer for Information Studies
(518) 442-3699
dbernnard@albany.edu

Richard Irving
Bibliographer for Political Science, Public Administration & Policy, and Law
(518) 442-3698
rirving@albany.edu

So, do not hesitate to call or email them and set up an appointment to get help for your most final projects or assignments. They are here to help and are happy to sit down and work through a problem with you.

There are tons of ways to contact the reference desk at the Dewey Library to get help, and there will always be a person just a call or click away. There is the old fashioned visit to the reference desk: consult the web page listing the hours for reference service. For you new age users here are a few of the other ways to contact us. Give us a call at 442-3691, send us an email through the Ask-A-Librarian service, instant message with a librarian, even text us a question at 265010 and make sure to start your message with ualibraries: (don't forget the colon!). So give us a call, an IM, a text, the possibilities are endless!

We know as the semester wraps up, everyone tends to get a little stressed out. Well stress certainly will not help you get your work done, so here are a few tips to help relieve stress and prepare for a successful finals period.

•Organization is a key to reducing your stress level. Make sure you have all of your assignments in order and that you have all of the materials necessary to complete them. Keeping all of your notes, assignments, and other materials in one place can help to minimize the search for them later on.
•Make use of the library study areas for you or your group to get together and enjoy a quiet study session. There are some rooms available for reservation in the Main and Science libraries.
•Beginning with a positive attitude is the first step to having a stress free middle of the term. Instead of starting of your midterm worrying about all your assignments, begin by getting organized and process your assignments one by one.
•Leisure activities or hobbies are proven stress relievers and in the process you have fun and do something you enjoy. Whatever you do as far as hobbies or activities, make sure to schedule time to continue to do these things in the midst of your midterm studies.

Finally, as you prepare for your finals and projects you may want to spend a large amount of time in the library. For a complete list of library hours visit the library webpage to see the list of hours for all of the University libraries. Note that only the main library will have extended hours and Dewey and the Science libraries will not. You will see that for finals the main library will have 24 hour access from December 12-16. So check out all of the hours and plan accordingly. Good Luck, you can do it!

Blog post created by Benjamin Knowles

November 15, 2011

Getting Started on Social Welfare Policy Research

Research in social welfare policy requires a multi-disciplinary approach that draws sources from both the social welfare and Public Policy fields. Fortunately, Dewey Library has a plethora of materials in both.

Reference materials are always a good place to start your research because they give you a quick overview of a topic and help you find keywords that can be used during your search process. The Encyclopedia of Social Work (Dewey Reference HV 12 E53 2008 and also online) is a four volume encyclopedia that provides an overview of more than 400 social welfare topics and definitions. Each article details a topic’s background, scope and issues and includes a useful bibliography. The Comprehensive Handbook of Social Work and Social Welfare (Call Number: Dewey Library Reference HV 40 C635 2008), also a four volume set, provides an overview of the social work field. The fourth volume focuses on social policy and policy practice and provides a substantive overview of the issues.

A number of books on social welfare policy have recently been added to the Libraries’ collection, including:

• Welfare, by Mary Daly (Call Number: Dewey HV 51 D36 2011)

• Gender and Welfare in Mexico: The Consolidation of a Postrevolutionary State, by Nichole Sanders (Call Number: University Library HN 117 S26 2011)

• Social Policy for Children and Families: A Risk and Resilience Perspective, edited by Jeffrey M. Jenson and Mark W. Fraser (Call Number: Dewey HV 741 S623 2011)

• Analyzing Social Policy: Multiple Perspectives for Critically Understanding and Evaluating Policy, by Mary Katherine O’Connor and F. Ellen Netting (Call Number: Dewey HN 17.5 O26 2011)

More books can be found by searching Minerva our online catalog.

Once you have an overview of your topic, you can search for journal articles, research reports, statues and regulations in the Libraries’ extensive collection of databases. Some of the most useful databases for social welfare policy research are listed below.

•Westlaw provides access to over 800 law reviews and journals, all federal and state cases including U.S. Supreme Court cases, statutes from all 50 states and D.C. and administrative codes from all 44 states, the full body of federal administrative regulations, and over 50,000 pages of current regulatory, administrative, and executive materials generated by key federal entities. It also provides access to newspapers, magazines, newswires and local and nationals broadcast transcripts.

• LexisNexis Academic provides access to over 10,000 news, business, and legal sources, including national and international newspapers, law review articles, the federal register, federal codes, statutes and regulations. It also provides access to the renowned Shepard's Citations service for all federal and states court cases back to 1789 which tracks all references and treatments of the case as well as if it has been overturned.

•ProQuest Congressional provides access to a comprehensive collection of historic and current congressional information, including the full text of congressional publications, finding aids, a bill tracking service, and the full text of public laws and other research materials.

•PAIS International provides references to books, journal articles, government documents, and privately published research reports on almost any topic that has a public affairs dimension both in the US and internationally. Coverage begins with 1972 but the PAIS Archive extends coverage back to 1915.

•Social Work Abstracts provides bibliographic coverage of current research focused on social work, human services, and related areas, including social welfare, social policy, and community development.

There are a variety of internet resources that are of use to the social work policy researcher. The websites of federal agencies National Institute on the Aging, the Department of Health and Human Services, and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration offer a wealth of information.

The website regulations.gov[ has a searchable database of regulations from almost 300 federal agencies, including the Administration for Children and Families, the Department of Veterans Affairs and the Federal Prisons Bureau. Through the site, users can comment on a regulation, set up email alerts or an RSS feed by agency, and submit an application, petition or adjudication document.

The Social Work Policy Institute (SWPI), a think tank established within the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Foundation, researches a variety of issues relating to social work and policy. The Maxwell School Center for Policy and Research at Syracuse University conducts a broad range of interdisciplinary related to public policy, including social welfare. The Center publishes a variety of working papers and policy briefs on their website.

More information on resources in social welfare can be found on the Social Welfare LibGuides . Public Policy research resources and tips can be found on the Public Administration and Policy LibGuides . In addition, you can stop by the Reference Desk for some one-on-one assistance.

October 25, 2011

Resources for Evidence Based Social Work Practice

Evidence-based practice is a prominent philosophy and process in today’s social work profession. The Dewey Library has several resources on evidence-based practice for social work that will be useful to social welfare students. These resources explain the concepts and theories related to evidence-based practice and the field of social work.

The second volume of the Encyclopedia of Social Work (Dewey Library Reference HV 45 E53 2009) has an extensive overview of evidence-based practice for social work. For evaluations examining the effectiveness of certain practices, check out the Campbell Collaboration and the Cochrane Collaboration . The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA is another resource for evidence-based practice. SAMHSA lists effective programs and treatment regimens in the National Registry of Evidence-Based Programs and Practices. The Encyclopedia of Social Work also highlights the findings in Developing Practice Guidelines for Social Work Intervention: Issues, Methods, and Research Agenda by Rosen and Proctor (Dewey Library Reserves HV 40.35 D48 2003). In this book, Rosen and Proctor develop guidelines that bring together knowledge in the social work field and empirically based practice.

The third volume of the Comprehensive Handbook of Social Work and Social Welfare (Dewey Library Reference HV 40 C635 2008) is another resource that has useful references on evidence-based practice. What Works in Child Welfare by Kluger, Alexander, and Curtis (Dewey Library HV 741 W383 2000) highlights evidence-based practice regarding child welfare. In the Journal of Social Work Education (Dewey Library Periodical HV 11 J66 V.39:2003 or online) the a rticle “Evidence-Based Practice: Sea Change of the Emperor's New Clothes� by Gambrill focuses on how evidence-based practice is an alternative to authority-based practice. These sources and many more are explained in the Comprehensive Handbook of Social Work and Social Welfare, making it a great starting point for research on evidence-based practice.

In addition to the resources mentioned, there are several more books on evidence-based practice for social work. Check out the following titles at the Dewey Library:

Social work research and evaluation: foundations of evidence-based practice. Richard M. Grinnell, Jr. and Yvonne A. Unrau. New York: Oxford University Press, 2011.
Dewey Library HV 11 S589 2011

Evidence-based practice in educating deaf and hard-of-hearing students. Patricia Elizabeth Spencer. New York: Oxford University Press, 2010.
Dewey Library HV 2430 S68 2010

Evidence-based practice in the field of substance abuse: a book of readings. Katherine van Wormer. Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Sage, c2010.
Dewey Library HV 4998 E95 2010

A beginner’s guide to evidence based practice in health and social care professions. Helen Aveyard. New York, NY: Open University Press, 2009.
Dewey Library R 723.7 A94X 2009

Evidence-based practice of cognitive-behavioral therapy. Deborah Dobson. New York: Guilford Press, c2009.
Dewey Library RC 489 C63 D63 2009

To find up-to-date journal articles on evidence-based practice, check out our databases . Click on "Social Welfare," and then select the subtopic "Evidence Based Practice" on the right. Evidence based practice as a subject heading in PsycInfo yields several results and Medline via PubMed is also has severa generall articles on evidence-based practice. Other relevant databases include CINAHL and Health Reference Center.

If you have any questions about evidence-based practice for social work, please contact our social welfare bibliographer Elaine Lasda Bergman by email [elasdabergman@albany.edu] or phone 442-3695.

September 27, 2011

Resources for School Social Work Research

If you’re interested in becoming a school social worker then check out these resources! The Dewey Library has a lot of relevant materials that will help you with your studies here at the University at Albany.

Journals

School social work journal. Dewey Library Periodical LB 3013.4 S36.
-This is a refereed journal specifically for school social workers. This publication provides original research, comprehensive reviews, and much more.

Journal of school psychology. Online Periodical: LB 3013.6 J6 WWW.
-Original articles and critical reviews related to psychology in a school setting can be found in this scholarly publication.

Preventing school failure
. Online Periodical: LB 3050 P74X WWW.
-A peer-reviewed academic journal that examines emerging and evidence-based practices for youths in educational settings.

Journal of psychoeducational assessment
. Online Periodical: LB 3051 J69X WWW.
-This refereed and scholarly journal provides the latest information on psychological and educational assessment practices.

Books


Social work services in schools. Paula Allen-Meares. Boston, MA : Allyn & Bacon, c2010.
Dewey Library LB 3013.4 A45 2010.
-Guide to developing the best social work practices in the fast-paced school environment.

The domains and demands of school social work practice : a guide to working effectively with students, families, and schools. Michael S. Kelly. Oxford, UK ; New York : Oxford University Press, c2008.
Dewey Library LB 3430 R35 2008.
-This book addresses the key roles social workers must play while in a school setting and how to be effective in these roles.

Suicide, self-injury, and violence in the schools :assessment, prevention, and intervention strategies. Gerald A. Juhnke. Hoboken, N.J. : John Wiley, c2011. Dewey Library HV 6545.8 J55 2011.
-Publication on working with suicidal students in school.

The school services sourcebook: a guide for school-based professionals.
edited by Cynthia Franklin. New York : Oxford University Press, 2006. Dewey Library Reserves LB 3013.4 S372 2006.
-Comprehensive sourcebook on evidence-based practice.

Professional Associations

School Social Work Association of America: Promotes the professional development of school social workers.

National Association of Social Workers: Has a special section of resources on school social work.

If you have any questions about these or any school social work titles at the Dewey Library, please stop by the reference desk or contact our reference bibliographer Elaine Lasda Bergman by email at elasdabergman@albany.edu, or phone 442-3695.

August 31, 2011

School of Social Welfare Computer/Information Literacy Requirements

It’s hard to believe that the fall 2011 semester is already here! In addition to attending classes, those of you in the Social Welfare program must also fulfill information literacy requirements here at the Dewey Library. All Social Welfare students must take the Social Welfare Research Seminar and one additional class. The Social Welfare Research Seminar will provide you with a general overview of using social welfare materials in the library. You will learn about basic library services and resources that will save you a lot time while conducting social welfare research in the future. This seminar is required within your first 15 credit hours in the program. Once you take the Social Welfare Research Seminar, you must attend another class within the first 31 credit hours. You have your choice of topics for the advanced seminar but the librarians at Dewey recommend certain classes for certain concentrations.

MACRO Concentration:
Introduction to Federal Public Policy Research: You will become familiar with finding the legal authority for a policy, sources for legislative history, and sources evaluating federal public policies.

Nonprofit Organizations-Information Sources: Learn about print, online, and internet sources related to nonprofit organizations

Direct Practice Concentration:
Introduction to Research Databases: Learn the basics on how to effectively search our databases.

Evidence Based Practice: You will learn how to find and evaluate resources of clinical social work
practice.

Introduction to Information Resources for Gerontology: Overview of key resources related to
gerontological social work and relevant reference works and databases will be covered.

All students can benefit from Introduction to Research Databases. This workshop will give you a well-rounded knowledge base of the available library resources. Attending this class will improve your researching skills, making you a better student here at the University at Albany.

If you have any questions, please contact our Social Welfare bibliographer, Elaine Lasda Bergman by email or phone 442-3695.

Blog post created by Katie Farrell

July 13, 2011

What is in Special Collections? Social Welfare Resources

The Libraries' Special Collections Department has a wide variety of resources that may be of interest to social welfare researchers. Here are brief summaries of some of the more relevant archives:

CAPITAL AREA COUNCIL OF CHURCHES
Records, 1941–2002, 9 cubic ft. (APAP–129)
The Capital Area Council of Churches (CACC) was founded in 1941. The majority of records in this collection are board minutes (with organizational constitutions, Director's Reports, and some committee minutes) reports, newsletters, administrative files, subject files, and some correspondence. There is also a collection of clippings from local newspapers. Meeting minutes and other documents show the origins of this organization. Many of the records show the degree to which the organization was concerned and involved with issues and events of local, national and international concern including World War II, the anti-Communist fervor, the Civil Rights Movement, the Abortion debate, the evolution of the State University of New York system, urban blight, and fair housing.

Sample records:
A photograph depicting the bestowing of the 1947 annual Christian Citizenship Awards from the Capital Area Council of Churches. The organization selected the awardees, including Mary Ellen Tellian (second from left), a student at the New York State College for Teachers (now the University at Albany, SUNY), for their leadership, community service, and inter-church activities.

An undated brochure from the Capital Area Council of Churches describing the organization's mission and member services.

MENTAL HEALTH ASSOCIATION IN NEW YORK STATE
Records, 1879-2001 (APAP-131)
The Mental Health Association in New York State, Inc. (MHANYS) was formed in 1960 as a statewide network of community based Mental Health Associations. MHANYS is an affiliate of the National Mental Health Association. The purposes of MHANYS are to promote mental health, to improve care and treatment of persons with mental disabilities, and to help prevent mental illness. MHANYS seeks to fulfill these goals through public education and citizen advocacy. The collection includes records of MHANYS's predecessor organizations, board files, administrative files, publications, project files, and related material.

Sample records
The summer 1996 issue of the Families Together! newsletter. Designed for families with children with special emotional, social, and behavioral needs, it was published by the Parent Support Network, a project of the Mental Health Association in New York State.

A 1999 photograph of a rally on the New York State Capitol steps in Albany for increased mental health services.

NEW YORK PUBLIC WELFARE ASSOCIATION
Records, 1928-2000, 10 cubic ft. (APAP-126)
The New York Public Welfare Association, founded in 1870, is a non-profit organization acting as an agency of the public welfare districts of the state in order to establish ways for obtaining the most economical and efficient administration of public assistance. To achieve this goal, the New York Public Welfare Association studies issues of public welfare administration, provides its members with an opportunity to exchange ideas and to benefit by the advice of experts in the field and suggests and develops better ways of providing for those individuals who need public welfare services. From the 1930s through the 1990s, committee meetings were always a focal point and numerous correspondence, minutes of meetings and meeting agendas are maintained which clearly illustrate the evolving nature of public welfare in New York State. The annual conference was crucial to the success of the organization for it allowed public welfare officials the opportunity to meet, share ideas, and collaborate collectively on important issues. As the 1960s and 1970s progressed, issues such as Medicaid, Medicare, and Social Security were often discussed in correspondence, meetings, and agendas. In the 1980s and 1990s, correspondence, meetings, and agendas often reflected such topics as welfare fraud, managed care, child support, and related issues.

Sample record:
The New York Public Welfare Association's Medical Assistance Committee's 1992 annual report highlighting its work on long-term care, trust laws, and the issue of Medicaid cost containment.

(more collections after the break...)

Continue reading "What is in Special Collections? Social Welfare Resources" »

July 11, 2011

Researching Disaster Relief Services

In recent months the United States has seen some of the worst natural disasters in our nation’s history. Most notable are the floods that plague North Dakota, and the tornado that has caused serious damage in Joplin, Missouri. The flooding in North Dakota has caused over 10,000 people to be evacuated from their homes and has left relief workers scrambling to save what is left of the towns affected. The tornado in Joplin Missouri has caused the deaths of over 116 people making it the most deadly tornado in Missouri history. These disasters highlight the need to be well informed on natural disasters and what can be done to prepare, manage, and rebuild in response to these events.

The need for social services in the aftermath of a disaster is vitally important, but those of us unaffected by the disaster only see news reports concerned with the damage and the death toll. Often outsiders are caught up in the media blitz after a disaster, and requests for financial help. This does not mean that there is no need to highlight social services and their role in disaster relief, rather outside observers should become aware of the need for these services and how they impact the lives of those directly affected by natural disasters. Below is a list of UAlbany resources and outside resources related to disaster relief. Use these resources to get a broader perspective on the role of social services, especially related to natural disasters.

Journals We Subscribe to (check Minerva for print and online access):


  • Disaster Prevention and Management

  • Disasters

  • Disasters, Preparedness and Mitigation in the Americas

Books at the Dewey Library:


  • When Their World Falls Apart : Helping Families and Children Manage the Effects of Disasters by Lawrence B. Rosenfeld (Dewey Library / HV 553 W48 2010)

  • Helping Families and Communities Recover from Disaster : Lessons Learned from Hurricane Katrina and its Aftermath edited by Ryan P. Kilmer (Dewey Library / HV 551.4 G85 H45 2010)

  • Creating Spiritual and Psychological Resilience : Integrating Care in Disaster Relief Work edited by Grant H. Brenner, Daniel H. Bush, Joshua Moses (Dewey Library / HV 553 C74 2010)

  • Disasters and Public Health: Planning and Responseby Bruce W. Clements (Dewey Library / RA 645.5 C527 2009)

  • Disasters and Democracy: The Politics of Extreme Natural Events by Rutherford H. Platt (Dewey Library / HV 555 U6 P53 1999)
  • Disaster Relief Blogs:

    If you have any further questions about disaster relief services or any other social welfare topic, contact Elaine M. Lasda Bergman, Social Welfare Bibliographer at: (518) 442-3695 or ebergman@uamail.albany.edu.

    Blog post created by Benjamin Knowles

June 1, 2011

Library Seminar for Advanced Standing Social Welfare Students

Students in the Advanced Standing program in the School of Social Welfare may wish to complete their first Inforamation Literacy requirement by taking the Social Welfare Research Seminar this summer. Students who complete this seminar will then have to take an elective library seminar in the fall or spring. Here are the dates and times for the summer sections of the Social Welfare Seminar (say that five times fast!):

  • Mon. June 6, 10:30 am

  • Wed. June 8, 9:30 am

  • Mon. June 20,10:00 am

  • Wed. June 22 ,11:00 am

  • Fri. June 24, 3:30 pm

Details about the Social Welfare Information Literacy requirement can be found on the Dewey Library Information Literacy Workshops page. You can register for this course from that link, by calling 442-3691, or dropping by the Reference Desk. If you are an Advanced Standing student and you are not able to take the seminar this summer, please check the Information Literacy Workshops page in August for the Fall schedule.

May 10, 2011

Congratulations, Social Welfare Graduates!

Congratulations on your graduation! The last paper is written, the last test is taken, you’ve received your diploma and said a fond farewell to grad school. So… now what? Be sure to use your alma mater’s resources – including the resources available to you at the Dewey Library, the Alumni Association (such as the Services for Job Seekers page), and UAlbany’s Career Services – to help you pass your boards and land a job.

The Dreaded Licensing ExamWe have three copies of the study guide for the Social Work Boards here at Dewey on Reserves. Stop by the circulation desk and ask for Study Guide: A Guide for Candidates Preparing for the ASWB Social Work Examination. You may also want to take a look at the UA guide for Licensing and Accreditation or SWES’s Home Study Examination Services; they have job listings up as well as study materials.

The Job Search BeginsProfessional associations are also a great way to get your foot in the door, network, and hear first about new job openings. Willing to travel a little? Check out some national organizations like CSWA or NASW. Willing to travel? Check out an international organization like IFSW if you’d like to pursue your career in another country. Rather stay close to home? Check out a NY organization or a local chapter of a national organization (like the NASW’s local chapter ).

The Dewey Library has several libguides up for Social Welfare, including some resources to help you jumpstart your career. Start out by browsing the Social Welfare Career Resources , Career and Education Resources, and the Professional Development pages. These guides will give you a good selection of national associations, web resources, and books to get your job hunt started. The library also have some newer titles available for you, including:

  • 101 Careers in Social Work by Jessica A. Ritter, Halaevalu F.O. Vakalahi, and Mary Kiernan-Stern (Reference: HV 10.5 R58 2009)

  • A Guidebook to Human Service Professions: Helping College Students Explore Opportunities in the Human Services Field edited by William G. Emener, Michael A. Richard, and John J. Bosworth (HV 10.5 G85 2009)

  • Nonprofit Organizations by Ann Morrill (Reference: HD 2769.15 M67 2011)

  • Resumes for Social Service Careers (Reference: HV 10.5 V49 2007)

In today’s economy, starting a career is harder than ever but we have faith in you! Your graduation from the Social Welfare program here at UAlbany is proof positive of your dedication, commitment, and knowledge. The Dewey Library would like to congratulate you on your accomplishments and offer you best wishes on the next chapter of your life.


Blog post created by Lauren Stern

March 29, 2011

Financial Literacy and Poverty Resources

In the National Strategy for Financial Literacy 2011, financial literacy is defined as “the information, education, and tools that [individuals and families] need to make good financial decisions in an increasingly complex U.S. and global financial system.� Some say that the on-going financial crisis illustrates the importance of financial literacy, which can be a barrier not only to personal prosperity but also to communities as a whole. Although financial literacy is being promoted by the government and various not-for-profit agencies – including the Jump$tart Coalition for Personal Financial Literacy, which has created a set of national standards for financial education – it remains unclear how financial education will be conducted within our communities. Will it be funded by the state or federal government, which both face budget crises? Or can the financial industry be expected to pick up the slack – even though it might not always lie in their best interests to educate their customers []? Will financial literacy truly help the current economic crisis, or is this a “blame the victim� sort of reasoning?

With all of these controversies and more, financial literacy is definitely a hot topic in the social welfare field today and UAlbany Libraries have a great selection of resources for those interested in learning more. Government documents are a great place to start for more information about the government policies and committees currently in place, and many are available online through the Minerva catalog:

Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs. (2010, July). The federal government's role in empowering Americans to make informed financial decisions. (S. Hrg. 111–665). Retrieved from http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=111%5Fsenate%5Fhearings&docid=f:58401.pdf

Financial Literacy and Education Commission. (2009, April). Progress made in fostering partnerships, but national strategy remains largely descriptive rather than strategic. (GAO-09-638T). Retrieved from http://purl.access.gpo.gov/GPO/LPS113494

Financial Literacy and Education Commission. (2006). Taking ownership of the future. Retrieved from http://www.eric.ed.gov/PDFS/ED496720.pdf

House Committee on Financial Services. (2008, April). Financial literacy and education: The effectiveness of governmental and private sector initiatives. (Serial No. 110–105). Retrieved from http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CHRG-110hhrg42717/pdf/CHRG-110hhrg42717.pdf

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. (2005). Improving financial literacy: Analysis of issues and policies. Retrieved from http://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/docserver/download/fulltext/2105101e.pdf?expires=1299172286&id=0000&accname=ocid41020973&checksum=A8D1441D9AE7D8A431D92C21D5DD426F

For more online resources, try checking out the new eDiscover service Trustworthy websites with a wide variety of resources include:

AICPA. (2010). 360 degrees of financial literacy. Retrieved from http://www.360financialliteracy.org/

Financial Literacy and Education Commission. (n.d.). MyMoney. Retrieved from http://www.mymoney.gov/

Jump$tart Coalition for Personal Financial Literacy. (2007). The National Standards in K–12 Personal Finance Education. Retrieved from http://www.jumpstart.org/assets/files/standard_book-ALL.pdf

NavPoint Institute for Financial Literacy. (2010). National benchmark standards: Adult personal finance education. Retrieved from http://www.navpointinstitute.org/pdfs/NationalStandards-Adult.pdf

For a full list of the online and print resources available to you on this topic, you can check out the display and extended bibliography located in the Dewey Library. If you need some feedback or tips for your own research on this topic, please make an appointment with Elaine Lasda Bergman, the social welfare bibliographer here at Dewey. You can email her at ebergman@uamail.albany.edu or call (518) 442-3695.

Blog post created by Lauren Stern

March 22, 2011

Locating Tests and Measures -- a Challenge?

Many Social Welfare researchers and students are required to locate various assessment instruments, tests, and measures; either to utilize or to analyze and evaluate. However, many times, the keyword searches we commonly use in Google, the Research Databases or Minerva do not provide us with the instrument itself. This can pose quite a research challenge. The Dewey Library has many resources at your disposal which can help. A good starting point is the Internet Resources �guide on the Social Welfare Research a Subject page, as it has several sources to help you. In the Dewey online collection we have Mental Measurements Yearbook and Tests in Print which is a guide to tests including how they may be ordered/purchased.


The Dewey Library also has extensive print holdings dealing with tests and measures. Here are a few of the newest texts owned by the library:

• “Measures for Clinical Practice and Research� is a resource devoted to finding the correct psychological test for a variety of situations. (Dewey Reference BF 176 C66 2007)

•“Encyclopedia of Psychological Assessment� is a reference to help you know which test or assessment is correct based on the client or situation. (Dewey Reference BF 176 E53X 2003)

•“Dictionary of Psychological Testing, Assessment, and Treatment� helps you find the correct test as well as treatment for a wide range of situation in the field of psychological assessment and measures. (Dewey Reference BF 176 S78 1995)

•“Guide to Early Psychological Evaluation: Children & Adolescents� by Ray W. Christner. (Dewey RJ 499.3 G85 2010)

•“Tests: A Comprehensive Reference for Assessments in Psychology, Education, and Business� (6th Edition) by Taddy Maddox. (Dewey BF 176 T43 2008)

•Handbook of Psychological Assessment by Gary Groth-Marnat. (Dewey BF 176 G76 2009)

•Assessment scales in child and adolescent psychiatry by Frank C. Verhulst and Jan Van Der Ende. (Dewey RJ 503.5 V47X 2006)

In addition to these sources, the University at Albany has its own School of Education Test Library[] (from the Division of Educational Psychology and Methodology). This website lists tests, books, hours for the library and more. The Test Library is located in Education B-11 on the Uptown Campus.

If you have any questions about locating tests and measures, please contact Elaine Bergman, the Social Welfare bibliographer. She can be reached by email (ebergman@uamail.albany.edu) or by phone (442-3695)

Blog post created by Benjamin Knowles

February 15, 2011

Dewey Workshops: Testimonial

For those of you who may be doubting the utility of this workshop, here is one student's reaction after having attended a session:

Thank you so much. I have to say that initially I was not looking forward to these seminars but having been through them I find them extremely useful. I was able to put the first one to work right away. Now I am wishing I had them my first year when I was not matriculated. I appreciate the practical nuts and bolts kind of stuff mixed with the instruction on how to do quality research. Thank you for providing this.

Remember, the schedule of workshops availablle online and a paper copy is available at the Reference Desk. To register, stop by the Reference Desk, call 442-3691, email dewclass@albany.edu, or use our online registration form.

November 30, 2010

Researching the History of Social Work

Social work today is a licensed profession and social welfare is an established academic discipline. However, it can be useful to go back and study the roots of the social welfare movement in the United States and the creation of social agencies. One individual often credited as a founder of social work and social welfare movements in the US is Jane Addams.

Jane Addams was an author, feminist, politician, and national advocate for social progress. She won the 1931 Nobel Peace Prize and was the president of a number of committees for social work and peace. She founded Hull House, one of the first settlement houses in the United States. Hull House was devoted to social welfare and “included children's clubs; nurseries; an art gallery; a circulating library; an employment bureau; a lunchroom; and classes in history, music, languages, painting, dancing, and mathematics� (Quam, 2008, n.p.).

Because Jane Addams was a prominent figure in her own time, many primary documents from her lifetime are available. To learn more about Jane Addams and her impact on the social work movement of the United States, please refer to the resources listed below.

Addams, J. (1899). A Function of the Social Settlement. The ANNALS of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, 13(3), 33-55. Retrieved from SAGE Political Science Full-Text Collection database.

Addams, Jane. (2009). In A Dictionary of Sociology. Retrieved from http://www.oxford
reference.com/views/ENTRY.html?entry=t88.e23

Bryan, M. L. M., Bair, B., and de Angury M. (Eds.). (2003). The selected papers of Jane Addams.
Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press.
University Library: HV 28 A35 A25 2003

Federal Bureau of Investigation. (2003). Jane Addams. Retrieved from http://foia.fbi.gov/
foiaindex/addams.htm

Fischer, M., Nackenoff, C., and Chmielewski, W. (Eds.). (2009). Jane Addams and the practice of
democracy
. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press.
Dewey Library: HV 28 A35 J35 2009

Hamington, M. (2009). The social philosophy of Jane Addams. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois
Press.
Dewey Library: HV 28 A35 H37 2009 (New Books Display)

Herrick, J. M. (2005). Settlement Houses (United States). In Encyclopedia of social welfare history in North America (pp. 329-330). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
Dewey Library: HV 12 E497 2005 (Reference)

Johnson, A. (2004). Social work is standing on the legacy of Jane Addams: But are we sitting on the sidelines? Social Work, 49(2), 319-322. Retrieved from CINAHL Plus with Full Text database.

Morissey, M. (2005). Addams, Jane (1860-1935). In Encyclopedia of social welfare history in North America (pp. 13-14). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications.
Dewey Library: HV 12 E497 2005 (Reference)

UIC College of Architecture and Arts. (2009). Jane Addams Hull-House Museum. Retrieved from http://www.uic.edu/jaddams/hull/hull_house.html

Quam, J. K. (2008). Addams, Jane. In The Encyclopedia of Social Work. Retrieved from
http://www.oxfordreference.com/views/ENTRY.html?subview=Main&entry=t203.e432

For online access to journal articles, try searching:
Academic Search Complete
CINAHL
America: History & Life
JSTOR

If you need assistance researching the history of social welfare movements in the United States or any
other social welfare topic, please contact Elaine Bergman who is the Dewey Library Bibliographer for Social Welfare. She can be reached at ebergman@uamail.albany.edu or 442-3695.

Blog post created by Lauren Stern

September 21, 2010

Researching Trauma Assessment and Treatments

Social workers and social welfare researchers are increasingly studying the effects of trauma on individuals and groups. Although the study of trauma is recent, understanding trauma and trauma reactions can be an important part of providing treatment and interventions for disadvantaged populations and others. At the macro-level, understanding trauma can inform one’s strategies for dealing with national emergencies and disasters.

The University Libraries have many helpful resources to learn more about assessing and treating trauma sufferers. A good place to start is the Encyclopedia of Social Work which is available in the Dewey Library (Reference: HV 12 E53 2008) and online. For further information, check out the following resources at the University Libraries:

Brom, D., Pat-Horenczyk, R., Ford, J. (2009).Treating traumatized children : risk, resilience, and recovery. London: Routledge.
Science Library RJ 506 P55 T75 2009

Bentovim, Antonin. (2009). Safeguarding children living with childhood and family violence: evidence based assessment, analysis, and planning interventions. London, UK: Jessica Kingsley Publishers.
Dewey Library: HQ 784 V55 S23 2009

Chu, J. A. (1998). Rebuilding shattered lives: The responsible treatment of complex post-traumatic and dissociative disorders. New York: Wiley.
Science Library RC 569.5 C55 C48 1998

Greenstone, James L. (2008). The elements of disaster psychology: managing psychosocial trauma: an integrated approach to force protection and acute care. Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas.
Dewey Library: RC 480.6 G7193 2008

Herman, J. L. (1992). Trauma and recovery. New York: Basic Books.
Science Library RC 552 P67 H47 1992

Kennedy, J. McCarthy, C. (1998). Bridging worlds : understanding and facilitating adolescent recovery from the trauma of abuse. Binghamton, NY : Haworth Maltreatment & Trauma Press. Dewey Library RJ 507 A29 K46 1998

Reyes, Gilbert, et.al., eds. (2008) The encyclopedia of psychological trauma. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley.
Dewey Library Reference: RC 552 P67 E53 2008

Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy. Online / Periodical: RC 552 P67 P78X

Also check out these online resources:

Social Work Resources on Disaster, Crisis and Trauma
Department of Veterans Affairs: National Center for PTSD
Trauma Information Pages

For more information on trauma research please contact our bibliographer for Social Welfare, Elaine Bergman. She can be reached by email at ebergman@uamail.albany.edu, or by calling 442-3695.

Blog post created by Katie Farrell and Elaine Bergman

August 25, 2010

What Seminars Should Social Welfare Students Take?

The School of Social Welfare's MSW program has an information literacy component consisting of two library seminars. Many students have questions about which seminars are most appropriate for their course of study.

All Social Welfare students must take the Social Welfare Research Seminar. This seminar is required within your first 15 credit hours in the program. You will learn about basic library services and resources that are particularly helpful for social welfare research, including databases, encyclopedias, internet resources. This class will provide you with a general orientation to beginning social welfare research using materials in the library, and teach you some advanced database searching strategies.

Once you take the Social Welfare Research Seminar, you have your choice of topics for the advanced seminar.
The topic may differ, depending on your academic concentration. Here is some assistance in making this choice:

General classes recommended for all students:

*Introduction to Research Databases: learn how to effectively search for articles using databases
* Conducting Research Online : an overview of research resources that can be accessed from outside the libraries
* Using EndNote: EndNote software helps organize sources and produce bibliographies

Recommended for direct practice students:

* Library Resources for Evidence-Based Practice: learn how to find and evaluate research information for clinical social work practice

Recommended for MACRO students:

* Introduction to Federal Public Policy Research: resources for finding the legal authority for polices, constructing a legislative history and evaluating federal public policies
* Introduction to Westlaw Campus: how to find statutes, regulations, cases, and other legal information
* Non-Profit Organizations: Information Sources: print, online and Internet sources for information regarding non-profit organizations

Recommended particularly for students with a concentration in Gerontology:

* Resources in Gerontology: this seminar covers specialized reference materials, databases and other resources that focus on social gerontology

Advanced registration is required for most seminars. Some of these classes fill up quickly, so register early as possible. The Social Welfare Research Seminar in particular fills up very quickly. Each week's offerings are posted on this blog each Monday. You can get more information and register online, by calling us at 442-3691, or stopping by the Reference Desk to pick up a schedule.

August 18, 2010

Researching Social Services for Veterans

Veterans are a unique population with unique issues. Many suffer from disorders such as Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and anxiety. Because of these issues social workers are a very important resource for veterans. If you’re a social work student you may have to research veterans and understand what information is out there. Luckily, the Dewey Library has plenty of resources on veterans. You can find the following at Dewey:

Baker, Rodney & Pickren Wade. Psychology and the Department of Veterans Affairs :a historical analysis of training, research, practice, and advocacy. Washington, DC : American Psychological Association, c2007.
Dewey Library / RA 790.6 B35 2007

Foy, David. Treating PTSD :cognitive-behavioral strategies. New York : Guilford Press, c1992.
Dewey Library / RC 552 P67 T765 1992

Friedman, Matthew. Post traumatic stress disorder : the latest assessment and treatment strategies. Kansas City, MO : Compact Clinicals, 2001, c2000.
Dewey Library RC 552 P67 F75 2001

Glantz, Aaron. The war comes home : Washington’s battle against America’s veterans. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2009.
Dewey Library / UB 357 G56 2009

Schwartz, Harvey. Psychotherapy of the combat veteran. New York : SP Medical & Scientific Books, c1984.
Dewey Library / RC 550 P78 1984

Scott, Michael & Stradling Stephen. Counselling for post-traumatic stress disorder. Thousand Oaks, Calif.: SAGE Publications, 2006.
Dewey Library / RC 552 P67 S35 2006

The United States Department of Veterans Affairs also has a lot of information on veterans and veteran services. RAND and the Invisible Wounds of War study offers information on veterans and the cognitive impact of war. Also check out the National Center for PTSD for more information on veterans and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

If you need help researching information on veterans please contact our bibliographer for social welfare, Elaine Bergman. She can be reached by email at ebergman@uamail.albany.edu, or by calling 442-3695.

Blog post created by Katie Farrell

July 28, 2010

Resources on Homelessness

Serving the homeless community is an important aspect of many social work careers. There are many factors that contribute to homelessness such as mental illness, poverty, and drug abuse. For more information on homelessness, check out these resources:

Homelessness in America. Robert Hartman McNamara. Westport, CT : Praeger Publishers, 2008. Dewey Library / HV 4505 H65117 2008

Understanding and responding to homeless experiences, identities and cultures. Mike Seal. Lyme Regis: Russell House Publishing, 2007. Dewey Library HV 4545 A4 U53 2007

Homelessness in rural America : policy and practice. Paul A. Rollinson and John T. Pardeck. New York: Haworth Press, 2006. Dewey Library HV 4505 R65 2006

Clinical guide to the treatment of the mentally ill homeless person. Paulette Marie Gillig and Hunter L. McQuistion. Washington, DC : American Psychiatric Pub., 2006. Dewey Library RC 451.4 H64 C555 2006

Contextualizing homelessness :critical theory, homelessness, and federal policy addressing the homeless. Ken Kyle. New York : Routledge, 2005. Dewey Library HV 4505 K95 2005

Being young and homeless :understanding how youth enter and exit street life. Jeff Karabanow. New York : Peter Lang, 2004. Dewey Library HV 4509 K37 2004

Reckoning with homelessness. Kim Hopper. Ithaca, NY : Cornell University Press, 2003. Dewey Library HV 4505 H665 2003

Who qualifies for rights? :homelessness, mental illness, and civil commitment. Judith Lynn Failer. Ithaca, N.Y. : Cornell University Press, 2002. Dewey Library KF 480 F25 2002

Homelessness and its consequences :the impact on children's psychological well-being. Rosemarie Theresa Downer. New York : Routledge, 2001. Dewey Library HV 4505 D68 2001

The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development also has more information on homelessness and the Homelessness Resource Center is a program created by U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Substance Abuse & Mental Health Services Administration.

If you have any questions about researching homelessness please contact Elaine Bergman, who is our Bibliographer for Reference, Social Welfare, and Gerontology. She can be contacted by email at: ebergman@uamail.albany.edu, or by calling 442-3695.

Blog post created by Katie Farrell

June 8, 2010

Additional Social Welfare Research Seminar Added to Summer Schedule

An additional Social Welfare Research Seminar has been added to the summer schedule to accomodate Advanced Practice Students. This Seminar will be held on Monday, June 28, 2010 at 11:00am. To register, please drop by the Reference Desk, call 442-3691, or use our online registration form.

June 7, 2010

Job Searching: Social work

http://library.albany.edu/help/im/For students who graduated in May, the next few months are often a period that is devoted full time to job searching. The Dewey Library has many resources that can assist with your search, and for the next few weeks we will focus on resources for each program on the downtown campus separately.

We recommend the Social Welfare subject guide as a starting point for many searches, and job searching is no different. On the page titled Getting Started in Social Welfare Research, there is a tab for Career and Education Resources . You will find both print and online sources for preparing for your job search as well as seeking jobs. In addition, check out the Professional Development tab on the Internet Resources page. This page provides a comprehensive list of professional associations related to Social Work. Such associations often run job listing websites and email lists, and provide programming and information to help keep current in your field.

If you would like to find a job in New York State, you might want to check out the web page for the New York State Chapter of the National Association of Social Workers (NASW). Information about nearby states such as Massachusetts and Vermont are also listed on the Career and Education Resources page.

General career information, such as resume writing and interview tips, job listings and internships are available in the Career Resources section of our Online Reference page.

The Dewey Library has other materials such as resume writing guides, examination manuals and other assistance for your job search. If you do a subject search for “Human Services – Vocational Guidance� in Minerva http://minerva.albany.edu, you will have a good start on items of interest. And don’t forget, we are always happy to help both current students and alumni, so email us, send us an Instant Message, call us (442-3691), or drop by the reference desk and Ask A Librarian!

May 24, 2010

Summer Sections of Social Welfare Seminar

Students in the Advanced Standing program in the School of Social Welfare may wish to complete their first Inforamation Literacy requirement by taking the Social Welfare Research Seminar this summer. Students who complete this seminar will then have to take an elective library seminar in the fall or spring. Here are the dates and times for the summer sections of the Social Welfare Seminar (say that five times fast!):

  • Tuesday, June 1, 2:00pm

  • Thursday, June 3, 10:00am

  • Monday, June 7, 11:00am

  • Wednesday, June 9, 3:00pm

Details about the Social Welfare Information Literacy requirement can be found on the Dewey Library Information Literacy Workshops page. You can register for this course from that link, by calling 442-3691, or dropping by the Reference Desk. If you are an Advanced Standing student and you are not able to take the seminar this summer, please check the Information Literacy Workshops page in August for the Fall schedule.

March 2, 2010

Resources for Future School Social Workers

February 28 - March 7th is National School Social Work Week! In honor of this special week, here are some useful resources for school social workers, and those stuyding to become one.

Easily one of the most important resources for soon-to-be school social workers is the School Social Work Association of America .

Secondly, we have Certification from Start to Finish. Maintained by the New York State Education Department, this site contains detailed information on the topic of becoming certified, including how to apply for the Pupil-Personnel certificate, which is required for anyone working as a school social worker in New York State.

In addition to the many resources available online, there are numerous resources located within our collection geared specifically for school social workers. Some of these resources include:

Kelly, Michael S. Domains and demands of school social work practice a guide to working effectively with students, families, and schools. New York: Oxford University Press, 2008.
Dewey Library / LB 3012.4 K44 2008

Raines, James Curtis. Evidence-based practice in school mental health. New York: Oxford University Press, 2008.
Dewey Library / LB 3430 R35 2008

The Dewey Library also subscribes to School Social Work Journal. Located at
DEWEY Per LB 3013.4 S36, we have the issues from 1983 to the present.

If you have any questions or need assistance in finding resources for school social workers, please contact our bibliographer for social welfare, Elaine Bergman. She can be reached by email at ebergman@uamail.albany.edu, or by calling 442-3695.

Blog post created by Matthew Laudicina

January 19, 2010

New books on Child Welfare

Protecting the welfare of a child may be one of the most critical social services in the community today. The effectiveness of our child welfare systems is the subject of many books and articles. Two new books have just arrived in the Dewey Library on the topic, about two aspects of the child welfare system. Here is an overview of each book:
child welfare super.jpg
Child Welfare Supervision: A Practical Guide for Supervisors, Managers and Administrators. Cathryn C. Potter and Charmaine R. Brittain, Eds. New York: Oxford UP. (2009). DEWEY HV 713 S89 2009
This book seeks to integrate research and managerial theory into supervisory practice in a child welfare setting. Each chapter is an essay written by a different author. They cover topics such as leadership, middle management, changing environments, diversity, staff retention, professional development and clinical supervision. This book successfully takes management theories about topics like decision making, supervisory leadership, or strengthening relationships and applies these theories along with current research to the day to day tasks faced by a child welfare supervisor. This book provides a useful mix of scholarly knowledge and practical application that will be useful to anyone looking to become a supervisor in a child welfare agency.

at risk.jpg
At Risk: Social Justice in Child Welfare and Other Human Services. Karen J. Swift and Marilyn Callahan. Toronto: University of Toronto Press. (2009). DEWEY HV 715 S95X 2009
The study of risk assessment is an increasingly important facet of social welfare research. This book studies the theories and various aspects of risk assessment in general: what it is, how it is used, its impacts and effects, and applies them the authors’ original research on risk assessment practices in a child welfare setting. Social policies are analyzed with relation to human rights and child welfare reform, among other topics. Various aspects on the efficacy of risk assessment and risk reduction are also covered. The true outcomes of many risk assessment practices do not accomplish the original goals. Human services professionals are advised to cast a critical eye on risk assessment instruments and their true impact on the lives of the most vulnerable people in our society.

December 1, 2009

Resources in Social Work Management

Here at UAlbany, students in the Social Welfare program have the option to pursue a concentration in either Clinical Social Work or Management/Administration. The Management/Administration, or MACRO, concentration focuses mainly on the administrative side of Social Work. Social work administration shares many of the components of administration found in other organizations, while at the same time requiring knowledge of human behavior, values, social problems, and social services. The roles taken on by a social work administrator are varied. Some of these roles often involve policy formation and goal setting, program design and implementation, management of key operations and the budget, direction and supervision of personnel, public relations, and evaluation. Many of the day to day tasks of a social work administrator include setting goals, acquiring the resources necessary to achieve those goals, problem solving and negotiating, team building, and managing information. The ability to work with and motivate others, as well as creative thinking and leadership, are the major keys to administrative success in the field of social work.

One of the preeminent organizations related to social work administration is The National Network for Social Work Managers. The Network is comprised of social workers from all levels of management that work in a broad and diverse range of human services organizations. The National Network for Social Work Managers is committed to aiding social work managers in the development of their management skills through annual conferences and the Network’s management standards. The standards set by the Network constitute the characteristics synonymous with quality management and identify the competencies needed by those working in management positions.

There are many resources available to Social Work Management students located right here in the Dewey Library, which include the following:

Hughes, Mark, and Michael Wearing. Organisations and Management in Social Work. Minneapolis: Sage Publications Ltd, 2007.Dewey Library / HD 7261 H84X 2007

Enhancing social work management theory and best practice from the UK and USA. Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley Publishers, 2007.Dewey Library / HV 245 E55 2007

An Empowering Approach to Managing Social Service Organizations. Boston: Springer Company, 2006. Dewey Library / HV 40 E465 2007

If you have any questions regarding Social Work Management, please Elaine Bergman, who is our Bibliographer for Reference, Social Welfare, and Gerontology. She can be contacted by email at: ebergman@uamail.albany.edu, or by calling 442-3695.

Blog post created by Matthew Laudicina

October 20, 2009

Clinical Social Work Resources

Individuals and families alike can suddenly find themselves in crisis due to any number of serious problems. HIV / AIDS, substance abuse, domestic violence, disability, teen pregnancy, physical and sexual abuse, post traumatic stress disorder, and mental illness are just a few of the many hardships that can impact the lives of many. Fortunately, people who find themselves facing such adversity are not alone in having to deal with their crisis. Clinical Social Workers specialize in helping individuals, families, and groups address a wide range of problems and guide them through their crisis. There are many resources available to people in search of more information regarding clinical social work.

New York State has an association, the New York State Society for Clinical Social Work, which is dedicated to clinical social workers. Their website contains information about the history, mission statement, and organizational structure of the society, definitions and descriptions of clinical social work, information on Society chapters and committees and how to join the society. The society also has a page that details the scope of practice for New York State’s Clinical Social Work.

There are many resources on the topic of clinical social work located right here in the Library. Recent additions to the library collection include the following:

Chang-Muy, Fernando and Elaine P. Congress. (2009) Social work with immigrants and refugees: legal issues, clinical skills and advocacy. New York: Springer.
Dewey Library / JV 6465 S63 2009

Cooper, Marline. (2008) Clinical social work practice: an integrated approach. Boston, MA : A&B/Pearson.
Dewey Library / HM 586 C66 2008

Mizrahi, Terry, and Larry E. Davis. (2008) The Encyclopedia of Social Work. New York: Oxford University Press.
Dewey Library / Reference HV 12 E53 2008

Ronen, Tammie. (2007) Cognitive behavior therapy in clinical social work practice. New York : Springer Pub. Co.
Dewey Library Reserves / RC 489 B4 C64 2007

Austrian, Sonia. (2005) Mental disorders, medications, and clinical social work. New York: Columbia University Press.
Dewey Graduate Library / HV 689 A88 2005

If you have any questions about researching clinical social work, please contact our Bibliographer for Reference, Social Welfare, and Gerontology, Elaine Bergman. She can be reached by calling 442-3695 or by email at :ebergman@uamail.albany.edu.

Blog post created by Matthew Laudicina

October 1, 2009

National Disability Employment Awareness Month

As you may or may not be aware, October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month. For many people with disabilities, attaining employment, or even getting fair consideration for a position from a potential employer, is a difficult task. Fortunately, there are federal organizations and multiple resources that people can turn to for help and information.

A great place to go for information is the website for the Office of Disability Employment Policy, which is available through the United States Department of Labor. According to their website, The Office of Disability Employment Policy (ODEP) provides national leadership on disability employment policy by developing and influencing the use of evidence-based disability employment policies and practices, building collaborative partnerships, and delivering authoritative and credible data on employment of people with disabilities.

In addition to the Office for Disability Employment Policy website, there are recently published books located right here in the Dewey Library with more information:

Haugen, David M. (2008) Rights of the Disabled. New York: Facts on File, 2008
Dewey Library / KF 480 H365 2008

Colker, Ruth. (2009) When is Separate Unequal? a Disability Perspective. New York: Cambridge University Press.
Dewey Library / KF 480 C655 2009

Erkulwater, Jennifer L. (2006) Disability Rights And the American Social Safety Net. New York: Cornell University Press.
Dewey Library / HD 7105.25 U6 E75 2006

Coming Soon to the Dewey Library:
Bagenstos, Samuel R. (2009) Law and the Contradictions of the Disability Rights Movement. New Haven: Yale University Press.
Dewey Library / On Order

If you have any questions or are in need of more information about the employment and/or rights of people with disabilities, please contact Social Welfare Bibliographer Elaine Bergman. She can be reached by email at ebergman@uamail.albany.edu, by telephone at 442-3695, or stop by the Reference Desk.

Blog post created by Matthew Laudicina

September 1, 2009

Social Welfare Information Literacy Requirement

Social Welfare students:

As you know, your program has an information literacy component consisting of two library seminars. Many students have questions about which seminars they should take.

All Social Welfare students must take the Social Welfare Research Seminar. This seminar is required within your first 15 credit hours in the program. You will learn about basic library services such as Document Delivery and Interlibrary loan, and highlight pertinent social welfare databases, encyclopedias, internet resources. Topics covered include test and measurement resources, statistics, and citing sources in APA format. This class will provide you with a general orientation to beginning social welfare research using materials in the library.

Once you take the Social Welfare Research Seminar, you have your choice of topics for the advanced seminar.
The topic may differ, depending on your academic concentration. Here is some assistance in making this choice:

General classes recommended for all students:

*Introduction to Research Databases: learn how to effectively search for articles using databases
* Conducting Research Online : an overview of research resources that can be accessed from outside the libraries
* Using EndNote: EndNote software helps organize sources and produce bibliographies

Recommended for direct practice students:

* Library Resources for Evidence-Based Practice: learn how to find and evaluate research information for clinical social work practice

Recommended for MACRO students:

* Introduction to Federal Public Policy Research: resources for finding the legal authority for polices, constructing a legislative history and evaluating federal public policies
* Introduction to Westlaw Campus: how to find statutes, regulations, cases, and other legal information
* Non-Profit Organizations: Information Sources: print, online and Internet sources for information regarding non-profit organizations

Recommended particularly for students with a concentration in Gerontology:

* Resources in Gerontology: this seminar covers specialized reference materials, databases and other resources that focus on social gerontology

Advanced registration is required for most seminars. Some of these classes fill up quickly, so register early as possible. The Social Welfare Research Seminar in particular fills up very quickly. Each week's offerings are posted on this blog each Monday. In addition to the online registration, you may also register in person at the Dewey Reference Desk or call us at 442-3691.

August 5, 2009

Seeking a Social Work Job?

101 Careers in Social Work / Jessica A Ritter, Halaevalu F. O. Vakalahi and Mary Kiernan-Stern [Dewey REF HV 10.5 R58 2009].

How often do we ask ourselves (or get asked) what we are going to do with that specialized college degree? If you’re a student in the social welfare program wondering this, you should check out this new reference title.

The first section of the book deals with what social welfare is and a general overview of the profession. It also guides you through what qualifies one as a social worker and what special licensing is involved in working in the profession, including information about being licensed to practice in multiple states.

Part II fills in the majority of the book, offering different areas in which a social worker can find a job. Examples given are working with child welfare, health care, criminal justice and the legal arena, academia, politics and human service organizations. Chapter 18 steps out suggesting alternative careers in social work, like being a documentary filmmaker or even an entrepreneur.

Finally, the book concludes with Part III as a “Where do we go from here?� commentary on successfully paying for your higher social welfare degree and landing the perfect job in your field. This book is a great resource for any social welfare student to consider outside of their regular coursework.

This book is available in the Dewey Reference collection. Come take a look today! If you need help locating the book, just ask us at the Reference Desk.

Blog post created by Jill Parsons

June 15, 2009

Final Social Welfare Research Seminar of the Summer

The final Social Welfare Research Seminar for the summer will be held Wednesday, June 17th at 3:00pm. Sign up in advance -- either in person at the Reference Desk, by calling 442-3691, or use our online registration form.

More seminars will be scheduled in the fall. If you were not able to take the seminar this June, keep an eye out for the fall schedule which will come out in late August.

June 5, 2009

Social Welfare Research Seminars

Advanced standing social welfare students, take note: two Social Welfare Research Seminars are scheduled for this week. Monday, June 8th at 11:30am and Tuesday, June 9th, at 2:30pm

These classes fill up rapidly, so sign up in advance -- either in person at the Reference Desk, by calling 442-3691, or use our online registration form.

June 1, 2009

Social Welfare Research Seminars

Advanced standing social welfare students, take note: two Social Welfare Research Seminars are scheduled for this week. Wednesday, June 3rd at 11:30am and Thursday, June 4th, at 2:30pm

These classes fill up rapidly, so sign up in advance -- either in person at the Reference Desk, by calling 442-3691, or use our online registration form.

April 14, 2009

Ageline's New Features

Students studying Social Welfare and Gerontology might be interested in the Ageline database. Ageline is an online research database produced by AARP (American Association of Retired People) that contains abstracts of books, reports, and articles on aging and on people middle-age and older. The abstracts are from both AARP and other publishers. Whenever possible, links are provided for the full text or for purchase information.

The Ageline database user interface has been recently improved. Some of the new features help you to search and retrieve information easier. These new features include:


  • Performing a basic search from the Ageline home page.

  • Sorting your results by most recent date, author, document type, source, title, or by relevance.

  • Displaying your search expression at the top of each of the results pages. You will find this at the top of each page labeled: “Your search: “.

  • Selecting the journal title link and displaying all entries in the database from that particular journal.

  • Selecting one of the subject terms in your result entry and displaying all entries in the database that have the same subject term.

  • Viewing the Advanced Search screen on one screen.

  • Displaying or hiding search options on the screen. These options include displaying more search fields, and displaying search options such as Publication Year, Target Audience, and Document Type.

  • Specifying the relationship between words when your search phrase contains more than one word. Meaning, you can specify whether the two or more words are next to each other, within five words of each other, in any position in the text, or whether the results must contain these words exactly as entered.

  • Limiting your results to be from the latest Ageline update.
  • All of the previous functions are still available. These allow you to limit your search results to only include entries that provide full-text online for free, perform searches for a particular author, particular title, or a particular subject, browse author, title, and subject indexes, use Boolean operators to create complex searches, and to print or download records.

    If you have any questions on how to use the Ageline database, or any other Social Welfare research assistance, please contact Elaine Bergman, the Social Welfare bibliographer at ebergman@uamail.albany.edu, or by phone 442-3695.

    Blog post created by Judith Mueller

March 17, 2009

Resources on Social Work History

Social welfare was sparked by the social conditions that were created in the 19th century, after the Civil War, and by the industrial revolution. While charity work has always existed throughout history backed by religion, the scientific approach towards caring for those who needed help started in the 1800’s. Social work applies social theory and research to improve the lives of those in society who need help. It uses other social sciences such as psychology, psychiatry, and sociology to provide answers to basic societal problems such as hunger, homelessness, limited education, discrimination, and abuse of various types (domestic, elder, child, substance, and sexual to name a few).

After the Civil War, many people immigrated to America, and many freed slaves moved to the cities looking for work. Poverty and other urban problems grew. Institutions like almshouses, orphanages, and settlement houses were built to help with basic needs such as health care, food, housing, and education. Along with poverty, other problems increased such as dangerous work conditions, child labor, discrimination against minorities, and long work weeks. Social Workers were the driving force behind many public policies that have changed the way society reacts to these problems. These policies include unemployment insurance, worker’s compensation, minimum wage, Social Security, Medicaid, and Medicare. There is also better treatment of those with disabilities, and mental illness, and civil rights are granted to all people regardless of race, religion, gender, or sexual orientation.

The Dewey Library has a robust collection of resources tracing the historical origins of social work in the United States.For more detailed information about the history of social welfare in America, check out some of the following sources in Dewey Library.

The following reference books can be found in Dewey Library:


  • Social Work Dictionary by Robert L. Barker - Dewey Library / Reference : HV 12 B37 2003

  • Social Work Almanac by Leon H. Ginsberg – Dewey Library / Reference : HV 90 G53 1995

  • The Encyclopedia of Social Welfare History in North America edited by John M. Herrick and Paul H. Stuart - Dewey Library / Reference : HV 12 E497 2005

The following books can be found in Dewey Library:

  • Milestones in the Development of Social Work and Social Welfare by Robert L. Barker - Dewey Library / HV 40 B22 1999

  • Newsletter – Social Welfare History Group by the Social Welfare History Group - Dewey Library / Periodical : HV 16 S63X

  • Charity and Mutual Aid in Europe and Northern America Since 1800 edited by Bernard Harris and Paul Bridgen – Dewey Library / HV 51 C43 2007

  • The Locus of Care : Families, Communities, Institutions, and the Provision of Welfare Since Antiquity edited by Peregrine Horden and Richard Smith - Dewey Library / HV 51 L63 1998

  • With Us Always : a History of Private Charity and Public Welfare edited by Donald T. Critchlow and Charles H. Parker - Dewey Library / HV 16 W58 1998

  • From Poor Law to Welfare State : a History of Social Welfare in America by Walter I. Trattner - Dewey Library Reserves / HV 91 T7 1999

  • In the Shadow of the Poorhouse : a Social History of Welfare in America by Michael B. Katz – Dewey Library / HV 91 K349 1996

  • The Reluctant Welfare State : a History of American Social Welfare Policies by Bruce S. Jansson - Dewey Library Reserves / HN 57 J25 1993

  • The Dangerous Classes of New York, and Twenty Years’ Work Among Them by Charles Loring Brace - Dewey Library / HV 743 N5 B8 1973

  • Widows and Orphans First : the Family Economy and Social Welfare Policy, 1880-1939 by S.J. Kleinberg - Dewey Library / HV 699 K585 2006

  • Social Welfare : a history of the American Response to need by June Azinn and Mark J. Stern - Dewey Library / HV 91 A94 2005

And a few interesting web sites:

If you have questions about doing Social Welfare research, talk to Elaine Bergman, our Social Welfare Bibliographer. She can help with advanced database searching and other quick ways to obtain the information you need. E-mail her at ebergman@uamail.albany.edu or call 442-3965 to set up an appointment.

Blog post created by Judith Mueller

February 17, 2009

Ethical Decision Making for Social Workers

Ethical decision making is a very important part of social work. Ethical dilemmas can come up in myriad situations, such as those which involve: personal relationships with current and former clients; client refusal of services; cultural sensitivity issues; end of life decision making; and privacy protection in counseling and research study design. Social welfare students have a number of resources to help them research ethical decision making in a social work environment.

The National Association of Social Workers has published a Code of Ethics, and the International Federation of Social Workers also has an Ethics Document which provide guidelines for ethical decision making.

The database Social Work Abstracts has a number of articles on this topic. To locate the database, go to the library's Database Finder and click on the letter "S" at the bottom of the page. Use keyword searches such as ethics, or more precisely “ethical dilemmas,� or “ethical decision making.�

In addition the Libraries have a number of recently published books which students of social work ethics may find useful:

Banks, Sarah. (2006) Ethics and values in social work. New York: Palgrave MacMillan.
Dewey Library / HV 10.5 B335X 2006

Guttmann, David. (2006) Ethics in social work : a context of caring. New York: Haworth Press.
Dewey Library / HV 40 G98 2006

Reamer, Frederic G. (2006) Social work values and ethics. New York: Columbia University Press.
Dewey Library / HV 10.5 R427 2006

International Federation of Social Workers. (2007) International definition of the social work profession; Ethics in social work, statement of principles; Global standards for the education and training of the social work profession. Berne, Switzerland: International Federation of Social Workers.
Dewey Library / HV 40 I548X 2007

And, Coming Soon:
Gambrill, Eileen, ed. (2009)Social work ethics. Burlington, VT: Ashgate.
Dewey Library/ On Order

If you have any questions about researching ethics from a social welfare perspective, please contact Social Welfare Bibliographer Elaine Bergman (phone: 442-3695, email: ebergman@uamail.albany.edu), or stop by the Reference Desk.

January 20, 2009

Recommended Seminars for Social Welfare Students

The Social Welfare program has an information literacy component which requires students to take two library seminars during the course of their studies. Many students have questions about which seminars are appropriate for their course of study. Here is an overview of some useful seminars and who might most benefit from taking them.

All Social Welfare students must take the Social Welfare Research Seminar. We suggest that you take this before you take the elective seminar. In this class we cover basic library services such as Document Delivery and Interlibrary loan, and highlight pertinent social welfare databases, encyclopedias, internet resources. Topics covered include test and measurement resources, statistics, and citing sources in APA format. This class will provide you with a general orientation to beginning social welfare research using materials in the library.

Once you take the Social Welfare Research Seminar, you have your choice of topics for the advanced seminar.
The topic may differ, depending on your academic concentration. Here is some assistance in making this choice:

Recommended for all students:

* MINERVA, UA Libraries' Online Catalog : advanced skills in using the Library Catalog and locating and accessing library materials
*Introduction to Research Databases: learn how to effectively search for articles using databases
* Conducting Research from Home : an overview of research resources that can be accessed from outside the libraries
* Using EndNote: EndNote software helps organize sources and produce bibliographies

Recommended particularly for direct practice students:

* Library Resources for Evidence-Based Practice: learn how to find and evaluate research information for clinical social work practice

Recommended particularly for MACRO students:

* Introduction to Federal Public Policy Research: resources for finding the legal authority for polices, constructing a legislative history and evaluating federal public policies
* Introduction to Westlaw Campus: how to find statutes, regulations, cases, and other legal information
* Non-Profit Organizations: Information Sources: print, online and Internet sources for information regarding non-profit organizations

Recommended particularly for students with a concentration in Gerontology:

* Resources in Gerontology: this seminar covers specialized reference materials, databases and other resources that focus on social gerontology

Because some of these classes are in high demand, we strongly suggest that you register for a class as early as possible. The Social Welfare Research Seminar in particular fills up very quickly. Each week's offerings are posted on this blog each Monday. In addition to the online registration, you may also register in person at the Dewey Reference Desk or call us at 442-3691.

December 9, 2008

Social Welfare Job Searching

Graduating Social Welfare students or those expecting to graduate in May of 2009 looking for a job might want to check out the library’s selection of career and job seeking resources for social work. On the library’s main web page on the right hand side, select “Social Welfare� in the “My Research Subject is…" field. Then select “Social Welfare Career Resources�.

Dewey Library has many books on careers in social work for those still trying to narrow down their specialty. Check out the books in the Books on Social Work Careers section. These can provide more in-depth descriptions of various career avenues one can pursue with a social welfare degree.

For information about what career resources the University at Albany has available, as well as some basic career guides, check out the General Resources section.

Professional organizations in any field contain a wealth of information for those just starting out in a new career, including help with finding employment. For example, if you are interested in working as a School Social Worker, you might want to check out the School Social Work Association of America.(Or if you want to specialize in working in a hospice, you would want to check out the American Hospice Foundation. For more information about the social welfare professional associations, see the General Resources section.

If you are preparing to take the licensing test, you might want to check out Social Work Examination Services. For more information about licensing, see the Licensing and Accreditation section.

If you would like to find a job in New York State, you might want to check out the web page for the New York State Chapter of the National Association of Social Workers (NASW). For more information about possible jobs within the states of New York, Massachusetts, and Vermont, see the State Job Resources section.

There are other specific "niche" organizations that may help you narrow your search by subject, or perspective. For example, if you would like to find work as a social worker with a special interest of working with to Christians, check out the North American Association of Christians in Social Work. For more information about possible jobs throughout the United States, see the U. S. Job Resources section.

The Dewey Library has other materials such as resume writing guides, examination manuals and other assistance for your job search. If you have any questions about these resources, Ask-A-Librarian!

November 12, 2008

New Faculty Publication

You may know William Roth, a prominent faculty member in the University at Albany’s School of Social Welfare. His memoir, titled Movement is a tri-fold step into his life as he describes in his own words his world, living with dystonia, winning a battle with cancer and being the song of parents who escaped the Holocaust. This book is now available at the Dewey Library, Call Number:RC 280 T7 R68 2008.

Dystonia is a neurological movement disorder that causes unpredictable muscle spasms. It tends to develop in one’s childhood, which is what happened to Roth. He noticed one winter that his left foot began to curl inward and soon was diagnosed with dystonia, something that will remain with him until this day. Combined with a tricky bout of cancer later in life, Roth is an exemplary survivor.

Roth’s memoir starts with a prologue of his disorder and progresses as each chapter takes hold of one of three central topics: dystonia, cancer, and family history. While the chapters go back in forth in his life, the constant theme is indeed movement, particularly forward. As one delves into the book, each chapter progresses until the unfortunate circumstances of having his father treat family (and other) victims of the Holocaust and dystonia become one, and in the end, the stories come full circle.

Growing up, we learn he both comes to terms with and struggles with dystonia. He undergoes risky (some might call it experimental) surgery as a child to lessen, perhaps even stop, the dystonia that will infiltrate his body. The disorder causes his muscles to jerk randomly , limiting his social interactions, yet, Roth succeeds in keeping his ground and enters Yale, finding himself involved in many activist engagements. This would only be the start of Roth’s interest in becoming an activist: It is not until he takes a tour of Willowbrook in the 1970’s, an institution for young people with developmental disabilities, he sees the horror in how “the other� is treated. Roth then becomes an activist gaining rights for disabled persons, and later establishes the Center for Computing and Disability at UAlbany.

In his adult life, Roth learns he has cancer via a large tumor in the back of his throat. Coupled with dystonia, the surgeries and chemotherapy to rid the cancer are even more complicated. Roth consults with some of the best doctors and surgeons in the northeast to be on his “team�, just as one would select the best players in baseball to be part of their team. He assembles his team for medical expertise, to help him weigh decisions or just to be there to simply talk about the fears of cancer. After the first, invasive surgery and therapy, the cancer isn’t eliminated. The second time? Home run. All this after a few strikeouts at bat along the way.

This may seem simple on paper, but the vignettes of Roth’s life come together to tell a story of triumph and heartache that life gives. While the chapters do a dance to unfold the story, there is a sense that Roth himself moves continually forward, only stopping for brief moments to reflect. Often in his memoir, he will pose question as to why certain events happened in his life – why he got cancer, and how and what contributed to it. Roth ends his brief moments by saying “I will never know� and then the story moves forward. Even when he gets unexpected grim news along his cancer journey, he decides to split into two people, a sort of coping mechanism Roth uses to deal with the reality and emotionally charged feelings of cancer.

Perhaps Movement is a way of Roth to reflect on his life, to string together the most important components to see his life, rather than just living it. He thrives despite his dystonia, overcomes cancer against all odds and dedicates his all to being a devoted father to his son, Daniel. In the end, Roth claims he is loves life and its people and is not afraid to die, nor afraid to live. These are words we can all take from as we read Movement and perhaps find ourselves in Roth, winning great battles and overcoming limitations.

Roth.JPG

Faculty Member William Roth

Blog post created by Jill Parsons

October 17, 2008

Photo of the Week

Brustman and Bergman.jpg

Mary Jane Brustman (on the left) has taken on additional administrator responsibilities, and will be based at the uptown campus. Elaine Lasda Bergman (on the right) will assume the role of Social Welfare Bibliographer.

Photo credit: Morris Stilson

October 14, 2008

Mary Jane Brustman is Moving Up

Mary Jane Brustman, longtime Social Welfare bibliographer and Head of the Dewey Library, has been asked to take on increased management responsibilities within the University Libraries. We wish her well as she moves on to these expanded responsibilities. Although she will still be down at the Dewey Library a couple of afternoons a week, most of her time will be spent at the uptown campus.

As a result of this change, Elaine Lasda Bergman will be assuming the role of Bibliographer for Social Welfare. Already the bibliographer for Gerontology and Reference, we feel assured that Elaine will continue the high level of service and assistance with research that Mary Jane has provided to the students, staff and faculty of the School of Social Welfare. You may contact Elaine by email: ebergman@uamail.albany.edu or by calling her at 442-3695.

September 16, 2008

Social Welfare Research -- Where to Start?

Are you a new social welfare student?? Check out our library's main webpage at http://library.albany.edu. On the right side is My Research Subject. Select Social Welfare for a good place to start your library research:

mrs.jpg >

BE SURE TO NOTICE:
Databases & Other Electronic Resources. Search these databases to find research (especially articles) on your topic. Come to our library workshops to learn how to use databases.

Internet Resources for Social Welfare. Use these links to websites to support your research and internships. Websites here are on topics related to the School of Social Welfare curriculum.

Social Welfare Career Resources. Find out about books on social work careers, websites on finding jobs, accreditation and licensing.

Social Welfare: A Guide to Information Resources. Learn all about key information resources (including databases) for social work research.

For more information about important Social Welfare Resources, contact Mary Jane Brustman at 442-3517 or email her: mbrustman@uamail.albany.edu.

June 10, 2008

Now Online: Mental Measurements Yearbook and Tests in Print

UA Libraries now offer online access to the Mental Measurements Yearbook. This authoritative guide describes over 2,000 testing and assessment instruments, and has long been important resource for Social Welfare researchers. The database provides the same information in the print Mental Measurements Yearbook from 1985 to the present.

Our subscription is accompanied by Tests in Print, which provides bibliographic information on commercially available tests, including the publisher and purchase price.

To access these resources, go to the library's Databases and Indexes page, and click on "M" to locate Mental Measurements Yearbook. On the database's main search page (which is the familiar Ebsco interface), click the "Choose Databases" link at the top of the search page and select Tests in Print to search the two resources simultaneously.

A brief session with a librarian can help you more effectively learn how to use the Mental Measurements Yearbook and Tests in Print -- remember to Ask-A-Librarian!

Blog post created by Michael V. Daly

May 12, 2008

Summer Dates for Social Welfare Research Seminar

New MSW students may sign up for one of three Social Welfare Research Seminar sessions held in June. The Social Welfare Research Seminar is part of the MSW program’s information literacy requirement and is mandatory for all students pursuing the Masters' degree in Social Welfare.

The June schedule is as follows:

  • June 9 (Monday): 11:00am
  • June 18 (Wednesday): 4:30pm
  • June 25 (Wednesday): 4:00pm

You may sign up one of three ways: stop by the Dewey Library Reference Desk, call us at 442-3691, or register online.

April 27, 2008

Only Two Workshops Left!

Dewey will be offering the final two informational workshops for graduate students this week. If you are a Social Welfare student needing to fulfill the information literacy requirement, you may want to use this opportunity to complete the workshop before the end of the semester. Sign up in person at the Dewey reference desk, call 442-3691, or register online.

This weeks classes:

Thursday:
2:00 PM: Introduction to Online Research Databases

Friday:
11:00 AM: Conducting Research from Home

February 12, 2008

Which Library Workshops Should Social Work Students Take ???

Many Social Welfare students come to us with questions about which library seminars they must take in order to graduate.

We recommend that all Social Welfare students first take the Social Welfare Research Seminar. In this class we cover: library services, the library website, encyclopedias and dictionaries, basics of searching the
MINERVA library catalog, which databases to use, introduction to database searching, Internet sources for social welfare including test and measurement resources and statistics, evaluating information, finding APA Style information.

After you have taken the Social Welfare Resarch Seminar, you will likely need to take an advanced or more specialized seminar. The topic may differ, depending on your academic concentration. Here is some assistance in making this choice:

Recommended for all students:


  • MINERVA, UA Libraries' Online Catalog : advanced skills in using the Library Catalog and locating and accessing library materials

  • Introduction to Research Databases: learn how to effectively search for articles using databases

  • Conducting Research from Home : an overview of research resources that can be accessed from outside the libraries

  • Using EndNote: EndNote software helps organize sources and produce bibliographies
  • Using the Web to Communication and Collaborate: Learn about blogs, wikis, RSS and more

Recommended particularly for direct practice students:


  • Library Resources for Evidence-Based Practice: learn how to find and evaluate research information for clinical social work practice

Recommended particularly for MACRO students:


  • Introduction to Federal Public Policy Research: resources for finding the legal authority for polices, constructing a legislative history and evaluating federal public policies

  • IIntroduction to Westlaw Campus: how to find statutes, regulations, cases, and other legal information

  • Non-Profit Organizations: Information Sources: print, online and Internet sources for information regarding non-profit organizations

We encourage you to attend one or more of these seminars as soon as practiable -- you will get the most benefit out of the material covered if you attend the seminars early in your course of study. You can view the full schedule of seminars online. In addition, each week's offerings are posted on this blog each Monday. In addition to the online registration, you may also register in person at the Dewey Reference Desk or call us at 442-3691.

February 5, 2008

New Look and Features to Social Welfare and Criminal Justice Subject Guides

LIbrarians who are Subject Specialsts here at UAlbany have created online guides, to help you get the "lay of the land" with regard to key library resources for your academic discipline. These guides are found on the sidebar of our Dewey pages, under the heading: My Research Subject . You will also find them in the pull-down menu of the UA Libraries' main page .

Bibliographer (also the Head of Dewey) Mary Jane Brustman has updated the Subject Guides for Social Welfare and Criminal Justice.

The guides now include information about resources relevant resources in our Special Collections Department. For example, Special Collections has an archive of materials from Neighborhood and Community Associations, which may be useful for Social Welfare researchers; and The National Death Penalty Archive, of interest to some Criminal Justice researchers.

In addition to a slightly redesigned format (e.g., the guides now display an image of a recently published work by departmental faculty), the Social Welfare and Criminal Justice Subject Guides also have a "mini-update" at the bottom listing upcoming classes and library events that pertain to the subject.

We hope you'll take a look at the Subject Guides and provide us wiith feedback -- how helpful are these guides? What can we do to make them more useful? Our purpose is to make the library easier for you to use, so we welcome your opinions.

January 21, 2008

*New* Online Research Databases

The University at Albany Libraries now offer two new databases that may be of particular interest to the downtown campus community.

Public Administration Abstracts provides bibliographic information for a wide variety of topics related to the disciplne of public administration, for example: administration and economy; law, politics and society; administrative structures and organization; international relations, organizations and policy; national government; public and social services; taxation, budgeting and finance; and theory and methods. Coverage runs from 1974 to the present.

Abstracts in Social Gerontology provides bibliographic information on topics such as: elder abuse, services and advocacy for the elderly, mental and physical health issues affecting the elderly, caregiving, death and bereavement, family issues concerning the elderly, and legislation and policies affecting the elderly.

Both of these databases are replacing their print counterparts and are available from the Database and Indexes page on the UA Libraries' main web page.

Don't forget to contact us if you have questions about these new resources, or if we can help you with any other request.

January 18, 2008

Trial of Mental Measurements Yearbook Now Available

The Mental Measurements Yearbook, an authoritative guide to over 2,000 testing and assessment instruments, has long been important resource for Social Welfare researchers. We currently only offer this reference in it's print format; however, we are currently testing an online version. To access the online version, go to the library's Databases and Indexes page. Click on the Ebsco link in the middle of the page. When you get to the Ebsco search screen, click on the blue "Choose Databases" tab at the top of the page.

choose databases.gif

Check the box next to the Mental Measurements Yearbook and click "Continue."

select mmy.gif

Please let us know what you think of the online format. Feel free to comment below, or contact Mary Jane Brustman, the Bibliographer for Social Welfare.

December 17, 2007

Locating Tests and Measures -- a Challenge?

Many Social Welfare researchers and students are required to locate various assessment instruments, tests, and measures; either to utilize or to analyze and evaluate. However, many times, the keyword searches we commonly use in Google, the Research Databases or Minerva do not provide us with the instrument itself. This can pose quite a research challenge. The Dewey Library has many resources at your disposal which can help. A good starting point is the Social Welfare “My Research Subject� page -- it has several sources to help you. Under the subcategory "Internet Resources in Social Welfare" you will find a section of websites specifically dealing with tests and measures, here are some examples:


  • A website known as Tests and Measures in the Social Sciences lists the 10,000 measures found in full in 97 books.

  • A complementary site, SDSU (San Diego State University)TestFinder lists more books with tests and measures and many citations to those included in journal articles.

  • Testlink from Educational Testing Service offers more than 20,000 educational and psychological tests and measurements. Some tests can be downloaded free or for a fee from the site; others must be ordered.


These are only a sample of what may be found under this category of the Internet Resources in Social Welfare page. Check to see if there is anything useful to you.

In addition to Internet sites, University at Albany has its own School of EducationTest Library (from the Division of Educational Psychology and Methodology). This website lists tests, books, hours for the library and more. The Test Library is located in Education B-11 on the Uptown Campus.

In the Dewey print collections,we also have Tests in Print [Dewey Library Reference LB 1131.5 B8], a guide to tests including how they may be ordered/purchased.

Librarians are happy to help you with any of these sources or any other research issues. Contact the Reference Desk and we will be glad to be of assistance. If you have questions specific to Social Welfare, please contact Mary Jane Brustman to set up an appointment. You may e-mail her or call her (442-3517).

September 26, 2007

Gerontology Subject Specialist

Elaine Lasda Bergman, currently the Reference Bibliographer at Dewey Library, is taking on a new role as Gerontology Subject Specialist starting this week.

Elaine has several years of experience as a reference librarian and bibliographer at University at Albany. She also has expertise in health care information from her work as manager of the library at the Healthcare Association of New York State. Elaine will be purchasing gerontology materials for the library as well as assisting researchers and doing presentations.

Elaine is available at ebergman@uamail.albany.edu phone: 442-3695


September 19, 2007

Reference Question of the Week

Q: I am a returning grad student in Social Work who has been out of school for some time. I have been assigned a paper in my first class that asks for at least 12 "peer reviewed articles." How would I go about finding articles that are peer-reviewed?

A: When you go to search for articles through our "Database Finder" at http://library.albany.edu/databases/search.asp you can narrow the databases down by subject on the menu at the bottom of the screen. You can select Social Welfare from that list and it will provide you with a list of databases that are strong in your subject area.

To find peer reviewed articles, you will need to narrow down the search in the databases. For most Social Welfare topics the best place to start is in Social Work Abstracts. This database includes the 100 most important journals in the social welfare field. You can supplement this search with Social Services Abstracts (for human services literature generally) and PsycINFO (for psychology and psychiatry literature.)

Most databases have a feature to limit your search to Peer Reviewed (i.e. scholarly or research) articles. In Social Services Abstracts you can limit your search to Peer Reviewed after you complete your initial search. Just click on the green menu bar above your search results. In PsycINFO look for the “Limit Search� feature. Limiting to Peer Reviewed is especially important when using general databases like EBSCO Academic Search Premier. There you can “Refine Search� to retrieve only peer reviewed articles.

For further reference, we have a subject guide for social welfare that may be of help to you: http://library.albany.edu/subject/social_main.html .

Also, if you have any in depth questions about research, our Social Welfare Librarian would be happy to help.
Her contact information is as follows:
Mary Jane Brustman
Dewey Library 442-3517
mbrustman@uamail.albany.edu

August 17, 2006

Workshops Available - Sign Up Today!

For all the new Social Welfare masters students: Be sure to sign up for your first required workshop soon at http://library.albany.edu/dewey/classschedule.htm .

The class will provide you with information about library services (such as ERes, free article delivery service, wireless access, etc.), basic reference sources, using the University Libraries website, what databases are available, how to search databases, what is a research article, using the Internet for research, citing sources and more. Undergraduates, doctoral students, and faculty are welcome as well.

A similar class is available with information and resources for Criminal Justice students. If you take these classes early in the semester you will be prepared to do efficient research.

Questions? E-mail Mary Jane Brustman, Librarian for Social Welfare and Criminal Justice, at mbrustman@uamail.albany.edu .