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March 5, 2014

What's New In Reference?

Here are some of the latest and greatest in our Reference collection. Three of the four are available online, so you can access them from home without borrowing. If you are interested in these new books, please drop by the Dewey Library Reference Desk and a librarian will be happy to assist you!

military.jpgLife After the Military: A Handbook for Transitioning Veterans by Janelle Hill. Lanham, MD: Government Institutes, 2011.Dewey Library/ UB 357 H55 2011 and online.
This text serves as a practical guide to those returning from enlistment. Topics covered in the text include developing a transition plan and new career advice as well as a broad range of living and financial strategies. The text also includes a useful appendix that covers outside resources and helpful checklists. Life After the Military would prove helpful to not only a returning enlistee but also family members or friends.


americanlibraries.jpg The American Public Library Handbook by Marco Guy. Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited, 2012. Online.
A reference text that describes the many roles the public library has played in the past and the way it functions in the present. These include looking at the public library through topical, biographical, institutional and bibliographical lenses. A handbook like this may not prove particularly valuable to your next door neighbor; however, its contents could prove invaluable to the future librarian interested in learning about things like bookmobiles and new technology trends. Important topics are broken down into helpful sections on terminology, historical summary, current trends complete with detailed references.

govtinternet.jpg The United States Government Internet Directory by Shana Hertz Hattis, ed. Lanham, MD: Bernan Press, 2013. Online.
A digital reference text with information on the maze that is federal government-related information. As paradoxical as a physical text that indexes a portion of the World Wide Web sounds, the contents provide useful tools to help navigate the sea of virtual bureaucracy. Contents include a guide to available mobile apps, a quick guide for finding government websites and an appendix on how to reach members of the current congress. This reference text is useful to an information scientist in a government agency or a public librarian helping a patron who can’t speak English find helpful public resources.


supcourt.jpg Justices of the United States Supreme Court: Their Lives and Major Opinions, by Leon Friedman and Fred Israel, ed. New York, NY: Facts On File, 2013. Dewey/KF 8744 F75 2013
The text is a comprehensive, four volume set looking at supreme court justices and their rulings. The extensive biographical look at each justice’s life includes details like religion, upbringing and every court ruling they have made. The volumes are written in an unbiased vernacular, making the text perfect for academic research as well as teaching a generation of students about the important SCOTUS rulings.


Blog post by Mark Seabury

February 19, 2014

The University Libraries: Bringing You the World

Library Boy.jpg
The University Libraries has an impressive collection. Between the three libraries, we house over 2,237,300 print volumes, almost 3 million microforms and more than 25 thousand maps and charts. In addition, we have access to almost 600 thousand electronic journals, online government documents and ebooks, along with 13,718 film, video and audio recordings. Believe it or not, we are adding new resources to our collection all the time.

Even with all this stuff, it sometimes happens that we don’t have the book, article or DVD that you need. Does that mean you are out of luck? That you have to buy the item yourself or change your paper topic? Absolutely not! The Libraries’ Interlibrary Loan (ILL) service will find your item at another library and bring it to campus for you to check out.

If you find a resource in Minerva that is in one of the libraries on the uptown campus or in storage, we can bring that to you too with our UA Delivery service.

To submit an ILL or UA Delivery request, log into your ILLiad account with your NetID and password (click on the “Interlibrary Loan / UA Delivery” link on the left side of the Libraries’ homepage). Select the type of item you are requesting from the list on the left, and then fill out the form, being sure to fill out the “Location” field, indicating whether we own the item or not. Make sure that you have filled out all the fields in red, and include as much information as you can. Use the “Notes field to include information that does not fit into the other fields or note any mistakes in the Minerva record. Always double check the information you have entered before you submit the form.

Before you submit an ILL request, be sure to check in Minerva, our online catalog, to see if we have the item in our collection. If we own an item, but it has been checked out be another user (there is a date in the “Status” box in the Minerva record) do not submit an ILL request. Submit a Recall Request instead.

Turnaround times for request vary. UA Delivery requests usually take a few days. ILL article and book chapter requests usually take between two and four days, while books can take up to two weeks. Materials like DVDs, CD-ROMs and newly published books can take longer. Be sure to take turnaround times into consideration when making your request.

You will receive an email when your item is available for pick up. Articles and book chapters will be delivered electronically to your ILLiad account, and books will be held for you at the Dewey circulation desk. Loan periods and renewal options are determined by the lending library.

For more information on ILL and UA Delivery, stop by the Reference Desk at any of the libraries, or contact us at 442-3691 or dewref@albany.edu.

Blog post created by Cary Gouldin
Photo Image from Microsoft Word Clip Art Collection

December 5, 2013

Citation Generators: Your New Best Friend?

Books_Page_1.jpgJust when you think you have finally put to bed that research paper that has haunted you for the past week and a half, it hits you: you still have to cite your sources! If only there was some sort of magic tool that would organize all your sources for you and spit out a perfectly formatted bibliography just in the nick of time.

Ok, so they are not actually magic, and none can really claim to be perfect, but citation generators can save you time and frustration when it comes time to tangle with citations. There are a plethora of citation generators around. Here is a round-up of some of the most popular:

EndNote is one of the most popular software tools for publishing and managing bibliographies on the Windows and Macintosh platforms. It helps users locate, organize and store bibliographic data. Users can create bibliographies for curricula vitae, manuscripts, grant proposals, term papers and other publications. EndNote is available for purchase on their website (including a student discount). It is also available for free on all UAlbany information commons computers.

Citation Machine is a free site that automatically produces MLA, APA, Turabian or Chicago style citations for a variety of sources (but not bibliographies). Users can copy and paste citations into Word. It was developed by David Warlick, an educator.

Citavi Free is a free, full-featured version of Citavi for up to 100 references. It allows you to analyze and organize content, save quotations and thoughts, organize your knowledge and structure your work.

Mendeley is a free reference manager and academic social network. Users can automatically generate bliographies, collaborate with other researchers online, import papers from other research software, find relevant papers, access papers from anywhere online, and read papers on the go with apps for iPhone and iPad.

Zotero is a free, open source program developed by George Mason University. It enables users to collect content, organize research into collections, cite sources, sync data across multiple devices, and collaborate with other researchers. It is a perennial favorite of the University Libraries.

For information other recommended citations generators, check out our handy LibGuide . No citation generator is perfect, so always check your end product to make sure that it is formatted in accordance with rules of the style guide you are using. Our CitationFox for APA and MLA can help you make sure that all your commas and periods are in the right place. You can also go right to the source:

Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association, c2010. Dewey Library / Reference: LB 2369 A62X 2010.

MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers. New York: Modern Language Association of America, 2009. Dewey Library / Reference: LB 2369 G53 2009.

The Chicago Manual of Style. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2003. Dewey Library / Reference: LB 2369 C42X 2003 and Online.

A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations: Chicago Style for Students and Researchers by Kate L. Turabian. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2007. Dewey Library / Reference: LB 2369 T8 2007.

For assistance on citing sources, visit the reference desk or contact us at 442-3691 or dewref@albany.edu.

Blog post created by Cary Gouldin

November 13, 2013

New Resource: Oxford Bibliographies Online

research-studies_000.jpgThe University Libraries bring you another great resource to jumpstart your research on any number of topics.

Oxford Bibliographies Online combines an encyclopedia with an annotated bibliography, making it an ideal place to start your research. It covers subject fields from social work and public health to international law and criminology to political science and international studies. Each article is written by an expert in the field and peer-reviewed. Articles include an overview of the topic and a list of key scholarly resources on the topic complete with an annotation he help you quickly and easily identify resources for your project. You can find articles through key word searches or browse by topic. The Oxford Bibliographies are a great place to begin any research project.

For more information on this and any other resource at the Libraries, visit the Reference Desk or send us an email at dewref@albany.edu.

November 6, 2013

Put the Library in Your Pocket!


iphone2compressed.jpgOh Smartphones, where would we be without them? They wake us up on time, tell us where the nearest gas station is, help us keep our spending on track and bring us videos of puppies doing adorable things. They even put the University Libraries’ wealth of information at our fingertips!

That’s right; you can do an impressive amount of research anytime, anywhere, using a variety of specially designed web sites and apps. The Libraries’ mobile site [http://library.albany.edu/mobile] is always a great place to start your research. You can search Minerva, our online catalog, check the Libraries’ hours, get directions to the different libraries and access your My Library Account.

In addition, several of our database suppliers have mobile sites and apps that facilitate searching via tablets and smartphones:

EBSCO Mobile: Access all of the databases we subscribe to through the EBSCO platform, including Academic Search Complete, Social Work Abstracts, LISTA and Criminal Justice Abstracts via your iPhone, iPad, Android device or tablet. Experience the user-friendly EBSCO interface in the palm of your hand!

JSTOR: Instead of creating a specifically formatted site or device-specific apps, JSTOR has designed their web interface to automatically adjust itself to your device.

WorldCat Mobile : Learn about what materials are available at the University Libraries and at libraries around the world from your mobile device! Find which libraries own a particular item, link to that library’s catalog for more information and much more.

Scopus/SciVerse Mobile Applications: Here you can search Scopus articles and citations, view abstracts, and even set up email alerts on your mobile device!

LexisNexis Academic Mobile : Access a basic version of LexisNexis Academic to look up a news article, legal case, or company dossier.

ProQuest Mobile: Use your iPhone, Android device or Blackberry to search ProQuest databases like LISA, Social Services Abstracts and GenderWatch.

AccessMyLibrary College Edition: This app provides access to Gale resources, including Business Insights, Academic OneFile and the Gale Virtual Reference Library.

Has your research hit a dead-end? Or maybe it never quite got going in the first place. Don’t despair. You also have a reference librarian in your pocket! You can get help from one of our expert librarians by text, IM, phone or email.

For more information on accessing the Libraries’ resources, stop by the Reference Desk or give us a call at 442-3691.

October 30, 2013

What's New In Reference?


The University Libraries never rests in its quest to slake the UAlbany community’s thirst for knowledge. To that end, we are constantly in the lookout for new and informative books to add to our collection. The Dewey Library has recently added several new resources to its reference collection, including:

Measures for Clinical Practice and Research.jpgMeasures for Clinical Practice and Research: A Sourcebook by Kevin Corcoran and Joel Fischer. New York: Oxford University Press, 2013. Dewey Library / Reference: BF 176 C66 2013.

One of the key challenges of all types of practice and research is finding a way to measure the problem. This 2-volume book contains hundreds of the most useful measurement tools for use in clinical practice and in research. All measures are critiqued by the editors, who provide guidance on how to select and score them and the actual measures are wholly reproduced. This set includes an introduction to the basic principles of measurement, an overview of different types of measures, and an overview of the Rapid Assessment Inventories included herein. It also contains descriptions and reviews of each instrument. Volume I focuses on measures for use with couples, families, and children. Volume II focuses on measures for use with adults, whose conditions of concerns are not focused on family relationships or couple relationships.

Proposal Writing: Effective Grantsmanship by Soraya M. Coley and Cynthia A. Scheinberg. Los Angeles: SAGE Publications, 2014. Dewey Library / Reference: HV 41 C548 2014.

This resource offers a step-by-step guide to writing a successful grant proposal to meet community needs. Throughout the book, the authors provide a guided process to assist the new grantwriter in understanding how to find grant opportunities, how to develop a viable project and evaluate outcomes, and how to prepare an application for funding. The book is written for employees in the non-profit sector who are asked to write a proposal and for students who may ultimately have careers that require this skill.

The_SAGE_Handbook_of_Interview_Research.jpgThe Sage Handbook of Interview Research: The Complexity of the Craft edited by Jaber F. Gubrium, et al. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE, c2012. Dewey Library / Reference: H 61.28 H36 2012.

The second edition of this volume emphasizes the dynamic, interactional, and reflexive dimensions of the research interview. Contributors highlight the myriad dimensions of complexity that are emerging as researchers increasingly frame the interview as a communicative opportunity as much as a data-gathering format. The book begins with an overview of the history and conceptual transformations of the interview, which is followed by chapters that discuss the main components of interview practice. Taken together, the contributions to the handbook encourage readers to simultaneously learn the frameworks and technologies of interviewing and reflect on the epistemological foundations of the interview craft. The handbook has been updated to address recent developments, especially in qualitative interviewing. Twenty-six chapters are completely new; the remaining twelve chapters have been substantially revised to give readers access to the state of the art of interview research. Three entirely new sections include “Logistics of Interviewing,” “Self and Other in the Interview,” and “Ethics of the Interview.”

Support Programs for Ex-Offenders: A State-by-State Directory by Harry Spiller. Jefferson, NC: McFarland, c2011. Dewey Library / Reference: HV 8987 S65 2011.

The United States has the highest documented incarceration rate in the world; in 2008, for every 100,000 citizens, 764 were in jails or prisons. Nearly half of ex-convicts commit crimes following release, a statistic which has given rise to support programs that facilitate successful reintegration to society outside of prison. This directory offers a compilation of ex-offender programs run by the national government as well as by individual states. Addresses, phone numbers and web sites are listed for all organizations that aid the ex-convict in locating employment, housing, support groups, clothing and food. A vital resource for both organizations and individuals interested in facilitating the reintegration of released offenders.

White-Collar and Corporate Crime.jpgWhite-Collar and Corporate Crime: A Documentary and Reference Guide by Gilbert Geis. Santa Barbara, CA: Greenwood, c2011. Dewey Library / Reference: HV 6768 G452 2011.

This reference guide documents white-collar crimes by individuals and businesses over the past 150 years, from Gilded Age railroad scandals and the muckraking period to the Savings and Loan debacle and the corporate fallout during the recent economic meltdown. It traces the history of white-collar and corporate criminal behavior from the 1800s through the 2010 passage of the Dodd-Frank financial reform measure. Geis scrutinizes more than a century of episodes involving corporate corruption and other self-serving behaviors that violate antitrust laws, bribery statutes, and fraud laws. The various attempts made by authorities to rein in greed and the methods employed by wrongdoers to evade these controls are also discussed and evaluated. This book includes dozens of court documents, legislative hearing transcripts, muckraking articles, and accounts of crooked behavior in the upper echelons of power. It also includes a bibliography in each section that directs readers to supplementary sources.

For more information on the Libraries’ collections, visit the Reference Desk or contact us at 442-3691 or dewref@albany.edu.

Post created by Cary Gouldin

October 9, 2013

Borrow A Kindle at Dewey!



Have you ever needed a book right away and didn’t have time to wait for the library to order it through interlibrary loan? Remember how frustrated you got when the book that you had to have for class wasn’t on the library shelf? Now, you can obtain the books you need in a flash with a borrowed Kindle from the Dewey Graduate Library.

Students, faculty and staff in good standing may borrow a Paperwhite Kindle for a loan period of 14 days. You can use the Kindle to create an account to buy books from Amazon.com. Once you return the Kindle to the library, your account information will be scrubbed from the Kindle, so that others will not be able to use your information. Your account will still be active for you to use from another device or for the next time you borrow the Kindle from the library.

Ask to borrow a Kindle at the library and our staff will assist you. If you haven’t used a Kindle before, getting started is a simple matter of following prompts once you have turned the Kindle on. Make sure the register the Kindle using an account that you already have or you may create a new account. The Kindle includes a brief tutorial with instructions for use.

Amazon’s bookstore at amazon.com contains thousands of books available for purchase, and many classic volumes at no cost. And, if you have a library card from your local public library, you can borrow digital books at no cost. Check out your library’s website for information on their ebook collection.

Blog post created by Deborah Bernnard and Aurora Becker

September 29, 2013

Workshops and Seminars: 9/30/13 - 10/4/13

We are only offering the Social Welfare Research Seminar this week:

Wednesday 9/18 3:00PM-5:00PM Introduction to Research Databases

If you’d like to sign up for an instruction session at Dewey you can do so online, in person at the reference desk, or by calling us at 442 3691.

September 25, 2013

New Reference Books!

Here are some of the latest and greatest books that have been added to the reference collection!1

modern homelessness.JPGHombs, M. E. Modern Homelessness: A Reference Handbook. Santa Barbara, ABC-CLIO, c2011.
Dewey REF HV 4493 H63 2011

This is a reference handbook about the contemporary world issue of homelessness, focused on the last decade. Have there been any efforts to change the issue of homelessness? This reference source outlines the developing strategies and solutions that have been emerging to put an end to homelessness. The last decade has brought on key trends in the development of studies to reduce homelessness. Statistical data has shown that in 2005 to 2009 the number of people living without homes decreased by 36 percent (pg.XIII).


Sage Pub Admin.jpgPeter, B. G. and Pierre, J. The SAGE Handbook of Public Administration. London, Sage, c2012.
Dewey REF JF 1351 H277 2012

This reference book focuses on the “state-of-the-art in academic thinking and the current structures and processes for the administration of public policy” (Back cover). Why does Administration matter? This book looks extensively at the value of scholarly theory in the context of government action.



Supreme Court.jpgEpstein, L., and J. A. Segal. The Supreme Court Compendium. Los Angeles, SAGE/CQ Press, c2012.

Dewey REF KF8742 S914 2012

This reference book is for those that are interested in the Supreme Court’s history; review process; relationship with other political entities; and impact. It includes a collection of data to understand the court, the justices and case decisions. The book gives an overview of the Supreme Court from its history to its impact on certain policies.

If you have questions or need help locating any of these materials, drop by the Reference Desk or call us at 442-3691.

Blog post by Aurora Becker

September 22, 2013

Workshops and Seminars 9/23/13-9/27/13

We are once again offering the Social Welfare Research Seminar and the Introduction to Research Databases workshop.

Tuesday 9/24 1:00-3:00pm Social Welfare Research Seminar

Wednesday 9/25 3:00-4:00 pm Introduction to Research Databases

If you’d like to sign up for an instruction session at Dewey you can do so online, in person at the reference desk, or by calling us at 442 3691.

September 15, 2013

Seminars and Workshops 9/16/13-9/20/13

Come to our Introduction to Research Databases workshop and learn the basics on how to effectively search our databases. This session will help you save a lot of time in the future. The Social Welfare Research Seminar will introduce you to relevant resources in the social welfare field.

Monday 9/16 10AM:00-1200PM Social Welfare Research Seminar

Wednesday 9/18 1:00PM-2:00PM Introduction to Research Databases

If you’d like to sign up for an instruction session at Dewey you can do so online, in person at the reference desk, or by calling us at 442 3691.

September 8, 2013

Seminars and Workshops at Dewey: 9/9/13-9/13/13

The workshops at Dewey provide you with tips and tricks on how to make the most out of using our library resources for research and assignment. This is the first week of our Social Welfare Research Seminar. This seminar will introduce you to relevant resources in the social welfare field.

Wednesday 9/11 1:00-3:00PM Social Welfare Research Seminar

If you’d like to sign up for an instruction session at Dewey you can do so online, in person at the reference desk, or by calling us at 442 3691.

September 1, 2013

Orientation Tours at Dewey: 9/2/13-9/6/13

Dewey Library is offering orientation tours this week, here is the schedule: 

Wednesday, September 4, 4:00pm

Thursday September 5, 4:00pm

You can register for a tour online, in person at the Dewey Reference Desk, or by calling 442-3691.

August 30, 2013

If You Can't Make the In-Person Orientation Tour...

If our library tours don't jive with your schedule, we hope this goofy video will help familiarize you with our library!

August 28, 2013

Do You Have Your SUNYCard?

Your student ID, or SUNYCard is more than just identification. It has many uses on campus and is critical to using the library.

First and foremost, Your SUNYCard is your library card. Present your SUNYCard when you are checking out books from the library.

If you add money to your card, it will come in handy for several tasks. Your SUNYCard pays for printing, photocopying, and library fines.

The place where you add money to your card is called your Podium account. You can put money into your Podium account in many ways. The Dewey Library has a Podium Machine near the Reference Desk where you can add money to your account. Should you forget your SUNYCard, you can purchase a Podium card for $1.00 but then you will need to add money to the account itself. Also the Podium card simply allows printing and photocopying - you cannot borrow materials with it. To save yourself $1.00, remember to bring your SUNYCard when you come to the library!

There are several other ways to put money on your card: you can go to the SUNYCard office in the Campus Center (Room B-52), by call the SUNYCard office at 442-5989, mail a check or your credit card number on the appropriate form, or add money with a credit card online at PodiumNet.

For more questions about how the SUNYCard can be used at the library, stop by the Circulation Desk or call 442-3693.

August 14, 2013

New Titles in the Reference Collection

Here are some other great new books recently added to the Dewey Library reference collection. As always, if you are interested in looking at any of these titles or seeing what reference books we have on another topoic, please drop by the Dewey Library Reference Desk.

101 teen booklists.JPG

101 Great, Ready-to-use
Book Lists for Teens

Through much professional collaboration, librarian Nancy
Keane—creator of the award-wining website Booktalks-Quick
and Simple---
amassed this extensive list of current books appropriate for librarians
to draw from when searching for a teen book relevant to a specific topic, gender,
or interest.  The book breaks the lists
down into categories such as Genres, Characters, Books about Self, and
‘Readalike’ suggestions.  A few examples
of lists include: Steampunk, Bromance, Mean Girls, Werewolves, Secret
Societies, Vampires for Boys, Girls Who Kick Butt, and Humor. This
comprehensive guide is a great place to look when seeking advice for your
library’s teen section, and could prove especially useful in planning for Summer
Reading!

 

Keane, Nancy J.   101 great, ready-to-use book lists for teens /
  Nancy J. Keane.   Santa Barbara, California : Libraries
Unlimited, an imprint of ABC-CLIO, LLC, [2012]

Dewey Library / Reference: Z 1037 K287 2012


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children in disasters.jpg

Managing Children in Disasters



This book reviews steps that can and should be taken to protect children in
the event of a disaster striking a community. 
It explores the agencies and organizations already in place and
responsible for ensuring the safety of children in times of chaos or under a
threat.  Children must be protected and
handled differently than the rest of the population in the event of a disaster,
especially when separated from their parents. 
This book outlines the issues one should carefully consider when
managing children in the event of a disaster in both urban and rural
areas.  It also highlights disaster
preparedness needs that experts feel have been underappreciated and
underestimated.



Bullock, Jane A.   Managing children
in disasters :   planning for their
unique needs /   Jane A. Bullock, George
D. Haddow, Damon P. Coppola.   Boca
Raton, FL : CRC Press, c2011.

Dewey Library / Reference: HV 555 U6 B85 2011





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101-Careers-in-Counseling.jpg

101 Careers in Counseling

Previously featured in our Social Work Career Advice blog
post, this reference book is the perfect resource for unconventional leads on
your social work job search.  The author,
Shannon Hodges, has her thumb on the pulse of the most exciting careers for
counselors available today.  The book
offers questionnaires, checklists, and useful self-inventories; use our book
scanner and create yourself a handy guide from this Reference resource.  In addition to facts such as salary ranges
and necessary credentials, 101 Careers in
Counseling
offers firsthand accounts of actual counselors and their
experiences in the field and on their job searches.



Hodges, Shannon.   101 careers in counseling /
  Shannon Hodges.   New York : Springer Pub., c2012.

Dewey Library / Reference: BF 636.6 H63 2012





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terrorist orgs.JPGThe Complete Encyclopedia of Terrorist Organisations

It might surprise you to learn from this reference item just how many
terrorist cells and organizations are based in America.  This book provides an overview of each group
and its ideologies, as well cross-references to help readers make connections
and association between the groups.  Its
author served over twenty-eight years with the British Armed Forces and uses
this encyclopedia to convey his wealth of knowledge of current and recent
terrorist cell activity and notable figures within key organizations.

Ashley, Paul.   The complete encyclopedia of terrorist organisations /   Paul Ashley.   Philadelphia, PA : Casemate, 2012, c2011.
Dewey Library / Reference: HV 6431 A83X 2012

Blog post created by Laurie Buckley

July 22, 2013

What's New in Reference?

Check out some of the new additions to our reference collection! If you would like to see any of these books or have questions about other topics, stop by the reference desk, and a librarian will be happy to assist you!

worldhistory.jpgThe New Atlas of world history : Global Events at a Glance
The New Atlas of World History is the first historical atlas to depict world history in a way that allows visual comparisons between different regions over various time periods. This unique, color atlas features 55 maps that span human history-- from 6 million years ago to present day. This book could be an especially useful tool when trying to draw quick connections between historical periods and milestones of human progress in your research. Additionally, an extensive glossary of people and events makes reference quick & easy.
The new atlas of world history : global events at a glance / John Haywood. Princeton, NJ : Princeton University Press, 2011.
Dewey Library / Reference: G 1030 H39 2011


NYS constitution.JPGThe New York State Constitution

In this newly updated edition of The New York State Constitution, Haywood provides a rich, historical account of the state’s governing charter. The author analyzes the entire NYS constitution, with special attention to the changes it underwent after its initial drafting and the social movements and underlying reasons associated with these changes. If public policy in New York State is a focus of your studies, this book will provide you with a great framework of the state’s laws and the historical progression of redrafting the constitution underwent.
The New York State Constitution / Peter J. Galie, Christopher Bopst. New York : Oxford University Press, c2012.
Dewey Library / Reference: KFN 5680 1894 A6 G348 2012

ratingscalesmentalhealth.JPGRating scales in mental health
Rating Scales in Mental Health is ideal for mental health practitioners and students who use psychometric instruments and scales. If you’re new to the field, this book will introduce you to the fundamentals of using scales in mental health evaluations. This updated edition describes and analyzes 116 different scales across 20 different mental health categories. Many sample scales are included in this new reference item, as well as detailed tables and a helpful list of additional suggested resources.
Rating scales in mental health / Martha Sajatovic, Luis F. Ramirez. Baltimore, Md. : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2012.
Dewey Library / Reference: RC 473 P78 S245 2012


grantmoney.jpgGrant money through collaborative partnerships
In this ALA Editions Special Report, Nancy Maxwell advises that as we move into the future, many libraries will find that collaborating on a grant plan with another organization will be more likely to get them the grant money they desire. Further, we must think outside the box and team up to approach funding creatively for nontraditional projects with unusual partners. Finding the right angle and partner with which to apply for money is the most important part of this approach. In this book, Maxwell offers useful advice for securing funding for libraries through collaborative partnerships. Grant money can help revolutionize and revive a library; for tips on supporting your library with grants and gifts, check out Grant money through collaborative partnerships today!
Grant money through collaborative partnerships / Nancy Kalikow Maxwell. Chicago : American Library Association, 2012.
Dewey Library / Reference: Z 683.2 U6 M38 2012

Blog post created by Laurie Buckley

June 17, 2013

What's New In Reference?

Summer is the perfect time to catch up on the latest developments in your field. Take a look at some of the new reference books to dive into a new topic, brush up on an old one, or to inspire ideas for a new research project. Here are a few that have recently arrived in Dewey:

substance abuse.jpgSubstance Abuse in America
DEW REF HV 4999.2 S93 2012
This book offers a comprehensive overview of U.S. drug policy through the examination of primary source documents and a sociological review of the historical context of American drug policies. Its authors discuss the historical precedent for today’s policies, and focus on the social causes for the waxing and waning popularity of specific, illicit drugs in the U.S.








criminals.GIFWomen Criminals
DEW REF HV 6046 W654 2012

This 2-Volume, New-to-Dewey, Reference Book explores key topics and notable figures in female-perpetrated crimes; the first Volume looks at sociocultural issues and seeks to provide a stronger understanding of the female criminal mentality and gender-based evaluations of crime. The second Volume focuses on particular women and their stories and builds upon the earlier context provided in Volume 1, while illuminating the issues in a more personal way through first-hand accounts.







guns (1).JPGGuns in American Society
DEW REF HV 7436 G8783 2012

We now have the newest edition of Guns in American Society! First published in 2002, this new 2012 update tackles contemporary issues through a multi-focal lens. This book is a compendium of gun legislation and culture—its history, current issues, and trends within contemporary American society. The author, Greg Lee Carter, is a professor of sociology at Bryant University and has authored or edited 22 books.








If you are interested in the new titles at Dewey Library, please stop by our Reference Desk. A friendly librarian will be happy to help you out!


Blog post created by Laurie Buckley


May 15, 2013

Alumni Services at the Library

With graduation just around the corner you may have some questions about your library privileges after you get your diploma. This blog will tell you what you need to know!

Can I borrow books?
You are entitled to borrowing privileges at all three University at Albany Libraries. You must register in person at the circulation desk at any library and provide photo identification. It is encouraged that you visit during regular business hours. (8 a.m. - 5 p.m., Mon. - Fri.). You can borrow up to 25 items with a thirty day loan period. Materials can be renewed twice.

Can I use the databases?
You can register to use two databases at home (Academic Search and Business Source) and can visit the library to access any of the databases the University Libraries subscribe to on a public computer.

Can I use the wireless?
Wireless at the University Libraries can only be accessed by current students, faculty, and staff. Access to public computers is available with a guest log-in.

Can I get research assistance from a librarian?
Alumni are encouraged to use our Ask-A-Librarian email service or stop by the reference desk.

How can I stay current on the latest software programs and trends?
Sign up for a free technology class in our Interactive Media Center any time after graduation.

For more information please visit our alumni services page or stop by the reference desk. We wish you success in all of your future endeavors!

Blog post created by Kathryn Farrell

May 8, 2013

Study Spaces at the Dewey Library

It’s the time of year when exams, last minute projects and collaborative assignments are due. A trip to the Dewey Library can help you accomplish everything you need by the end of the semester!

The first floor of the Dewey Library has fifteen computers and several tables and chairs for studying. There is also the circulation desk for checking out materials and the reference desk for research assistance.

The lower level of the Dewey Library consists of a quiet information commons where you can use the library computers in silence. Need to work in a group? A stairway in the information commons leads to the group study area of the Dewey Library. Here, you can work on group projects at the tables and computers. There is also a whiteboard that can be used by checking out a dry erase marker at the circulation desk.

Whether it’s a quiet place to concentrate, an area for group work, or assistance with research, the Dewey Library is here to meet all of your study needs. Stop by the reference desk if you have any questions!

May 1, 2013

Check out Our Collections on Microform!

The Dewey Library has several microform collections that are available for viewing. Don’t know how to use the microfilm/fiche readers? Stop by the reference desk and a reference librarian can help you. It’s even possible to save to .PDF on your flash drive!

Minerva, the library’s online catalog, is the most effective way to search for microforms at the Dewey Library. It is possible to limit your search by format to microforms and by library in the Advanced Search option. It is easiest to find microform periodicals, newspapers, dissertations, serials, and monographs by searching by title.

Using our microfilm readers, you can review the content of these resources and either print them out or save them in PDF format to your flash drive.

Although not a comprehensive list, the following collections are a part of the microform materials at the Dewey Library.

The Complete Oral Arguments of the Supreme Court of the United States [microform]
Dewey Library Law KF 101 U54X

Crime and Juvenile Delinquency [microform]
Dewey Library Microfiche HV 6025 C75X
This collection includes a selection of important titles from the National Council on Crime and Delinquency Library, founded in 1921.

NCJRS Microfiche Collection [microform]
Dewey Library Microfiche HV 6001 N25X
This collection consists of the National Criminal Justice Reference Service documents on crime and law enforcement.

Census information
and dissertations are also available in microform. Please stop by the reference desk if you need any assistance accessing these materials!

Blog post created by Kathryn Farrell.

April 24, 2013

Come See Our State Parks Display!

Summer Display_Parks.jpgTo help you start thinking about summer, the Dewey Library display has information on the New York State Parks! Come check out books related to the parks and environmental policy as well as a bibliography with interesting park facts, websites, and books at the Dewey Library. Stop by and take a look!

Blog post and display created by Kathryn Farrell

April 10, 2013

Access to Pretty Much Anything: Direct Access and Interlibrary Loan


Although the total combined collection size of all three libraries and the Special Collections is over two million volumes, there are times when the University Libraries do not have the materials you need. However, this does not mean that you do not have access to these materials. The University Libraries offer several services to students, faculty, and staff to help them loan materials not owned by our libraries. These are a crucial part of our borrowing services, and we strongly encourage you to take advantage of these services when they are needed.

Perhaps the most ubiquitous and easy to use of these services is Interlibrary Loan. The Interlibrary Loan Department is able to offer short term loans of books and digital delivery of journal articles from libraries nationwide that the University Libraries do not already own. Some of the types of materials that can be requested through Interlibrary Loan include books and book chapters, journal articles, dissertations, audio/visual materials, and newspaper and archival materials on microfilm. To log in to your Interlibrary Loan account, all you have to do is enter your NetID and password. If the item you request is a book, audio/visual material like a DVD or CD, or any other type of physical media, you can pick it up once it has been delivered to your designated pick-up library. Journal articles requested through Interlibrary Loan will be delivered electronically to your Interlibrary Loan account.

Another service that the University Libraries are participating members is the Direct Access Program. Sponsored by the Capital District Library Council (CDLC), the Direct Access Program enables members of the UAlbany community to borrow from or use over fifty academic, public, law, medical, and technical libraries located in the Capital District. In order to make use of the CDLC Direct Access Program, you first need to pick up a CDLC Card, which you can get from the circulation desk at any of our libraries. For more information on the CDLC Direct Access Program, including a directory of participating libraries, please the visit the CDLC - Direct Access Program web site.

In addition to the services already mentioned, the University Libraries also provide Reciprocal Access to Research Collections and programs. These services include participation in the SUNY sponsored Open Access Program and the OCLC Reciprocal Faculty Borrowing Program from participating institutions, as well as borrowing privileges for UAlbany faculty, staff and students at the New York State Library, and the Center for Research Libraries in Chicago. Please visit Reciprocal Access to Research Collections for more information about each of these services.

If you have any questions about any of these resources, such as how to use them and how they can help you with your research, you can call the Dewey reference desk at 442-3691, instant message or text us, email us, or stop by the reference desk.

Blog post created by Kathryn Farrell

April 3, 2013

Get Expert Help in Your Subject!


If you’ve been struggling with your research or don’t know where to start, you may want to contact one of our bibliographers at the Dewey Library. Our bibliographers are subject specialists who have a lot of knowledge in their respective fields.

These are very nice people who have years of experience and are very willing to help you. Their knowledge of specialized databases, search terms, and key sources for information can help you at any stage of a research assignment or project. Many have created library guides which can help you find resources on a specific topic. Here is the information for all of the subject bibliographers
at the Dewey Library:

Elaine M. Lasda Bergman
Bibliographer for Dewey Reference, Social Welfare, and Gerontology
(518) 442-3695
elasdabergman@albany.edu

Deborah Bernnard
Bibliographer for Information Studies
(518) 442-3699
dbernnard@albany.edu

Richard Irving
Bibliographer for Criminal Justice, Political Science, Public Administration & Policy, and Law
(518) 442-3698
rirving@albany.edu

There is a complete listing of library subject specialists available on the library website, look for it under the "Research Assistance" tab.

Do not hesitate to call or email them and set up an appointment to get help for your most recent project or assignment. They are here to help and are happy to sit down and work through a problem with you.

Blog post created by Kathryn Farrell

March 27, 2013

ITS Assistants are Here to Help



The reference desk is the place to go for research help and assistance, but where does one turn for answers to those burning tech questions? Enter the ITS student assistant!
An ITS student assistant, provided by the consultants who work for Information Technology Services and are not library staff, can be found near the printer in the Information Commons area of the Dewey Library. ITS student assistants can help you connect to the wireless, use the software provided on our computers, and much more!

While classes are in session, their hours are:
Monday-Thursday 2pm-8pm
Friday 2pm-5pm
Sunday 2pm-6pm

For tech help when the ITS student assistant is not available, you can ask the Reference Desk for assistance with basic computer troubles such as printing or formatting a document in Microsoft Word. If the problem requires greater expertise, we will call the ITS HelpDesk, at 442-4000 or submit a request to the ITS Service Desk .

If you have any questions, please stop by the reference desk or ask our ITS student assistant!

March 13, 2013

Citation Management Tools


Citing sources can be a confusing and overwhelming task when you are doing research. Luckily, there are several citation generators that will make your life a lot easier. In this blog post we will discuss both free and subscription citation generators and common errors to look out for.

If you Google "free citation generator",you will get back thousands of results. There are a lot out there and it can be hard to determine which ones are the best. The University Libraries has put together a LibGuide that lists approved free citation generators. We'll discuss a couple of them in this blog post.

BibMe can help you cite in MLA, APA, Chicago, or Turabian formatting. Created by Carnegie Mellon University, BibMe has an auto fill feature and also allows you to switch between citation styles.

Mendeley is another free citation generator. This program not only automatically generates bibliographies, but it is also part of an academic social network. Mendeley gives users the opportunity to collaborate online with other researchers and allows you to sync your Mendeley library to your iPhone, iPad, or iPod Touch. This app is free to download and it is possible to read your papers offline.

NoodleTools Expressallows you to generate one or two quick citations in MLA, APA, or Chicago for free. In this free version, citations cannot be saved or exported to a word processor.

Zotero
is highly recommended by the University Libraries. This is a free and open source program. Developed by George Mason University, users can collect content, organize research into collections, cite sources, sync data across multiple devices, and collaborate with other researchers.

Subscription citation generators are another option. EasyBib has a free bibliography citation maker for MLA but for more styles you must subscribe. EasyBib is $19.99 a year. Users can cite and format in MLA, APA, Chicago, or Turabian styles, import citations from third party databases, and much more. Like NoodleBib, users can save bibliographies online or in Word. EasyBib also has an iPhone app that allows you to scan a book barcode or type in the title and generate a citation.

EndNote is a popular tool for managing bibliographies and it is available at the University Libraries. Users can store and manage bibliographic data as well as create bibliographies. For step-by-step instruction on how to use EndNote, please visit our LibGuide.

Citation generators are useful and time-saving tools. However, it is still your responsibility to make sure your bibliographic data is cited correctly. Errors can occur with citation generators and there are common mistakes that you should look out for:


  • Make sure everything is capitalized correctly by checking the appropriate citation guide.

  • With programs that automatically input bibliographic data such as Zotero, make sure the data being imported matches the style guide. If not, you will need to change the citation to reflect the style you are using.

  • Make sure to check the provided citations in databases such as EBSCO, Proquest, CSA, and Scopus. These databases generate citations as if the full text of the article was accessed. However, this is not always the case.


There are a lot of good choices when it comes to citation generators. Try some and see what works the best for you! Just remember to check your citations against the appropriate style guide. If you have any further questions about citation generators, please stop by the reference desk, call us at 442-3691, email us [], or IM or text us.

Blog post created by Kathryn Farrell

February 27, 2013

Get the Most out of the Library: Guides for Faculty and Grad Students

guides.jpgIn an effort to make navigating the library easier for our patrons, we have been working on a series of Library Guides targeted to different segments of the UAlbany community.These guides can be found in the “Services for” section of the “Library Services” tab on our homepage.

Our most recent is the Faculty Library Guide. The guide’s homepage features a list of the key resources and services that faculty use the most, including database access, interlibrary loan and UA Delivery, and the Libraries’ eBook collection. It also has a section to help new faculty navigate the library. The “Teaching” tab features the various ways the library can support your teaching, including electronic and traditional reserves, course-related library instruction and a variety of teaching related resources in our print and electronic collections.

The “Research” tab has four subpages that are chock full of information to support your research needs. Learn how to keep current on research in your field using RSS feeds and alert services in databases from vendors such as EBSCOhost, ProQuest and ScienceDirect. It also has information on blogs and wikis by academics for academics. The “Organize & Share Research” subpage has information on tools like CiteULike and Connotea that help you organize and manage your references, and social networking tools like LinkedIn and Faculty Row to help you connect with others in your field. The “Promotion and Tenure Support” subpage features information on tools that help you track the influence and impact of your research, like Microsoft Academic and Scholarometer.

The Graduate Student Library Guide is one-stop-shopping for grad students in all fields. It has information on finding print and electronic resources in the library, tools to help you manage your references and the highlights library services that grad students use the most. There is a tab for teaching assistants that has information on course reserves, using Blackboard, and requesting course related library instruction for your class.

We hope these highlights have tempted you to check out the guides for yourself. Once you have, please take a few minutes to let us know how we did. Please visit the feedback box on the right-hand side of each guide’s homepage to let us know what you think.For more information on these guides and the Libraries’ services and resources stop by the
reference desk.

Blog post by Cary Gouldin

February 13, 2013

Check Out Our Kindle!


Students, faculty, and staff in good standing can now check out a Kindle Paperwhite 3G at the Dewey circulation desk. Before checkout, the Kindle Agreement and Inventory Form must be signed. This form goes over the borrowing procedures at the University Libraries. What are the borrowing procedures, you ask? This blog will tell you all you need to know about checking
out a Kindle at the Dewey Library.

The Kindle can be checked out for 14 days and fines accrue at $15 a day with a maximum fine of $45. If the Kindle is not returned within 72 hours, it is considered “Lost” and the fine will be to replace the Kindle. We also recommend that you inspect the Kindle before checking out because there is a fine for damage. If there is damage the library will determine whether or not the damage is from misuse or normal wear and tear.

So now that you’ve signed the agreement form and checked out the Kindle, how do you use it? Before using the device, you must register the Kindle with your Amazon account. You may then download Kindle content on to the device.
To register the Kindle:
1. Turn the Kindle on.
2. Choose a language; tap OK
3. Tap Get Started
4. Tap Set up Wi-Fi later
5. Register Account: choose Use an existing Amazon account or Create a new one
6. Patron must enter his/her Amazon account email address and password, then select Register.
7. Will ask to connect to Facebook and Twitter or to Connect Later (Default: Choose Connect Later)
8. Follow brief tutorial
9. Tap the Home button.
To load purchased content on the Kindle:
1. Tap Cloud to see content in Patron’s Kindle library.
2. Tap title to download to device
3. Tap device to see content downloaded to Kindle Paperwhite
4. Enjoy using the Kindle!

When the Kindle is returned, it is deregistered and all content is deleted. If you have any questions on how to use the Kindle, please stop by the reference or circulation desk!

Blog post created by Kathryn Farrell

December 19, 2012

Dewey Library Intersession Closures

**Dewey and Science Libraries will be CLOSED December 21st - January 1st**
**Interlibrary Loan CLOSED December 24th, 25th, 31st and January 1st**

UADELIVERY & INTERLIBRARY LOAN ITEMS ON HOLD
Beginning Wednesday, December 19th items will NOT be sent to Dewey or Science Library for pick-up. They will be placed “On Hold” at the University Library Circulation Desk.
If you have items “On Hold” at Dewey Library or Science Library, please pick them up by Wednesday, December 19th.

On Thursday, December 20th any items “On Hold” that have not been picked up will be shipped to the University (Main) Library where they will remain “On Hold”. You may pick up your items from the University (Main) Library Circulation Desk.
On Thursday, January 3rd, any items that were “On Hold” for you at the University Library will be shipped back to your regular pick up location. (Please allow for turnaround time.)
SUSPENDED SERVICES DEC 19th - Jan 2nd

Office delivery services for Faculty; including the East Campus and College of Nanoscale Science & Engineering (CNSE). (This is due to closed buildings and reduced mail services during the Limited Operations Period of the Intersession Energy Savings Initiative.)
NOTE: Home delivery services for Distance Ed users and for Patrons with Disabilities will NOT be suspended.

SUBMITTING UADELIVERY REQUESTS FOR MATERIAL FROM DEWEY AND SCIENCE DECEMBER 21st - JANUARY
2nd

While the Dewey and Science Libraries are closed, you may continue to place UA Delivery Services requests through ILLiad. Library staff will make a run to Dewey Library on 12/27 and daily runs to the Science Library in order to pull material from the stacks so that it can be brought to the University Library for processing. Please allow for longer turnaround times.

Book Delivery - You may submit requests for books from Dewey and Science Libraries. You will be able to pick those books up from the University (Main) Library.
NOTE: We will not fill requests for books from the University Library to be picked up at the University Library.

Articles - Submit requests as usual.

(For UA Delivery information prior to and following the shutdown, call 518-442-3691 or 518-442-3517. For information during the shutdown, call 518-442-3613.)

SUBMITTING INTERLIBRARY LOAN REQUESTS DECEMBER 20th - JANUARY 2nd

The Interlibrary Loan office will be staffed for regular business hours during the holidays, with the exception that the office will be closed on December 24th, 25th , 31st and January 1st. You may submit interlibrary loan requests as usual. Due to the holiday closing of many libraries that lend us materials, please expect that it may take a bit longer than usual to fill your requests.

Books - You may submit requests for books as usual. However, during this period all books will be held at the University (Main) Library regardless of your normal pick location.

Articles - Submit requests as usual.
(For more information on Interlibrary Loan services, call 518-442-3613)

REGULAR UADELIVERY & INTERLIBRARY LOAN SERVICES WILL RESUME ON TUESDAY, JANUARY 3rd 2013

November 28, 2012

On a Reference Shelf Near You



At Dewey, we are always on the hunt for new, interesting and informative reference books to add to our collection. Check out these recent additions:

forensic.jpgA Dictionary of Forensic Science. Suzanne Bell. New York: Oxford University Press, c2012.
Dewey Library / Reference: HV 8073 B4246 2012.

This dictionary contains more than 1300 A-to-Z entries that cover the key concepts of forensic science, including a wide array of relevant terms from areas such as chemistry, biology, anthropology, art, engineering, firearms, trace evidence, crime scene investigation, and forensic computing. Web links to online resources are listed and regularly updated on a companion website, expanding the scope of the dictionary and pointing to more in-depth supplementary material. Many entries are complemented by case examples, figures, and photographs, which makes this an ideal reference for students and professionals in forensic science.

World Atlas.jpgEssential World Atlas. George Philip & Son. New York: Published in North America by Oxford University Press, c2011. Dewey Library / Reference: G 1021 E88 2011.

With superbly crafted maps covering the entire globe, this atlas offers thorough geographical coverage, a unique city-mapping program, and dozens of thematic maps, charts, and graphs that explain many fundamental concepts in human geography. It also includes coverage of up-to-the-minute political and topographical changes. It is packed with collateral information, such as statistics on the area, population, and annual income of every country in the world. Metro maps of dozens of cities provide detailed information on tourist attractions, public transportation, and other aspects of interest to the traveler. The map section is fully indexed, allowing for quick reference. The Atlas also includes a selection of stunning satellite images that provide an impression of our world from above, offering insight into how cities expand and rivers create life in the desert. Finally, the atlas includes a thematic "World in Focus" section, easy-to-use indices, survey data, and colorful illustrations of flags from around the world.

Librarian's Handbook.jpgLibrarian’s Handbook for Seeking, Writing, and Managing Grants. Sylvia D. Hall-Ellis, Stacey L. Bowers, Christopher Hudson, Claire Williamson and Joanne Patrick. Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited, c2011. Dewey Library / Reference: HD 69 P75 L533 2011.

This book is designed to present the dynamics of the grant-seeking process, including proposal writing and grant management, for public, school, and academic librarians. A comprehensive book that covers the full spectrum of the grant process, this handbook is designed to provide all the information necessary for librarians and educators to become effective members of grant-development and management teams. Written in an easy-to-understand, succinct format, it will be invaluable even for those with little or no background knowledge and regardless of the size or type of library or information center. Recognizing that grants are developed through a sequential process, the volume focuses on the fundamental components of grant planning, grant writing, and grant management. Readers will learn to identify potential federal and state funding sources, organize and manage the proposal development process, do research, and establish and encourage participation on local development teams. They will also learn about specific aspects of grant management, such as budget and finance monitoring; hiring; research compliance and policies; sub-agreements and partnership forms; and reporting requirements.

Modern homlessness.jpgModern Homelessness: A Reference Handbook. Mary Ellen Hombs. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, c2011. Dewey Library / Reference: HV 4493 H63 2011.

Focusing on the last decade, this handbook examines the issue in the United States and in other nations that have recently adopted new strategies to address homelessness—and achieved notable results in preventing and ending it. The handbook covers the crucial shifts in strategy and investment that resulted in the unprecedented reductions first announced in 2007. These fundamental changes are analyzed to identify the factors that proved most effective in altering the national and local dialogue and response relative to this daunting issue. In addition to a brief history of homelessness in contemporary times, this handbook examines key developments of the past decade in research, policy, housing models, and service delivery that have been shown to decrease homelessness. These include active partnership among the governments of the United States, Canada, England, Australia, New Zealand, and others that moved the discussion in a new direction. The effects of the 2008 financial crisis on homelessness are also considered.

Masters Social Work Licensing Examination: Study Guide. Association of Social Work Board. Culpeper, VA: ASWB, c2010. Dewey Library Reserves / HV 40.52 M37X 2010.

This guide is designed to help you prepare for the social work licensure examination that was developed by ASWB. The study guide includes a description of the examination development process and the administration procedures as well as suggestions on how to prepare for the examination. There are also sample questions and rationales for each content area of the examination, as well as a list of suggested references.

State and Local Government Finance.jpgThe Oxford Handbook of State and Local Government Finance. Robert D. Ebel and John E. Petersen, eds. New York: Oxford University Press, 2012. Dewey Library / Reference: HJ 275 O94 2012.

This handbook evaluates the persistent problems in the fiscal systems of state and local governments and what can be done to solve them. It contains 35 chapters authored by 60 practitioners and academics who are renowned scholars in state and local finance. Each chapter provides a description of the discipline area, examines major developments in policy, practices and research, and opines on future prospects. The chapters are divided into four sections. Section I is a systematic discussion of the institutional, economic, and political framework that provides a background for understanding the structure and financial performance of the state and local sector. The chapters in Section II provide an overview of the various components of state and local revenue systems and how they reacted to the Great Recession. They analyze the diverse forms of taxes and charges in detail, prescribe remedies and alternatives, and examine the implications for future revenue performance. Chapters in Section III turn to spending, borrowing and financial management in the state and local sector. The focus is on the big six service delivery sectors: education, health care, human services, transportation, pensions, and housing. Section IV is a set of chapters that look ahead and speculate about how the state and local government sector's money-raising, spending, and service delivery structures will adjust to the new circumstances.

Blog post created by Cary Gouldin

October 31, 2012

E-Books at the University Libraries


In today’s digital age an increasing number of people are looking for e-books to fulfill their academic needs. In recent years there has been a big push for libraries to acquire and provide access to e-books. The University Libraries have access to a large number of e-books and will continue to add more titles to the collection.

To find e-books in our online catalog, Minerva, you must select Online Resources under the Search Only feature in Minerva’s basic search. You then can search for e-books by keyword, author, exact title, and much more! E-book results will have an online location followed by the call number. Here is an example (click image for larger version):

ebook1.jpg

To access the e-book you must click on the location link.

You can also access e-books from our Online Reference page. Clicking e-books will bring you to free e-books available on the web and e-books provided by the University Libraries.

EBSCOHOST eBook Collection allows you to search for e-books like you would search for articles from any EBSCO database. Over 1,300 e-books covering a wide range of subjects are available.

Online editions of Congress and the Nation, Political Handbook of the World, and other political publications can be found at CQ Press Electronic Library. For e-books on computer science and information technology, Lecture Notes in Computer Science and Springer Computer Science eBook collection both provide current research in the field.

There are many relevant e-book collections that provide access to reliable reference sources. Gale Virtual Reference Library provides access to reference e-books on subjects in library science, multicultural studies, social sciences, and more. Oxford Reference Online provides over 170 reference e-books from Oxford Publishing and Oxford Scholarship Online publishes Oxford University Press e-books. Sage Reference Online provides subject encyclopedias on subjects such as counseling and psychotherapy, criminal justice, health and social care, and politics.

For more information on our e-book collection please stop by the reference desk, email us or call 442-3691.

Blog post created by Kathryn Farrell

October 24, 2012

Managing Graduate School Stress

stress_comic.gifStress and graduate school go hand in hand. While earning a degree, many students also earn sleep deprivation, irritability, chronic muscle pain, and high blood pressure. Learning healthy and effective stress management techniques will not only make you a happier and more productive student, but will also prepare you to handle job and family stress in the future.

Here are 10 tips to managing stress:

1. Break up large projects in to smaller pieces. Sometimes big projects are so overwhelming that you get stuck focusing on how much there is to do. This can make it difficult to know where and how to get started. If, instead, you think of the project as a series of smaller tasks, it is easier to see what can be done easily and immediately. Once you have a few things out of the way, the whole project seems more manageable.

2.Develop a plan of attack. Once you have identified the component tasks of a project, take some time to figure out how much time you need to devote to each task and in what order they need to be completed. Setting due dates for each task will help ensure that you get complete your project on time. If possible, add some wiggle-room to your schedule to give yourself time to deal with any unexpected issues.

3.Get organized. A few extra minutes devoted to organizing your research materials can save you hours of stress at the end of your project. Reference management software like EndNote and Zotero, both available on the Libraries’ public computers, can help you keep track of your sources and add references and bibliographies to your paper.

4.Use the right tool for the job and use it well. Take a workshop at Dewey to learn about the research tools available at the Libraries and how to use them effectively. Classes like Introduction to Federal Policy Research and the Social Welfare Research Seminar will introduce you to subject specific search strategies and resources.

5.Limit distractions when working. Even the best laid plans can be derailed by ringing phones, crying children and a new episode of your favorite TV show. The easiest way to ensure that you don’t get sidetracked is to find a quiet, dedicated study space. The Libraries have many options from quiet study areas to PhD student study carrels . Group study areas, like the one in the basement of Dewey, are perfect for study groups and joint projects.

6.Schedule downtime so you don’t get overworked. All work and no play may make Jack a dull boy, but it will also make him a miserable, stressed-out wreck. Make sure that your schedule includes time for hobbies and interests and fun with family and friends. Have a movie night with a DVD or two from the Libraries’ collection.

7.Get some exercise. In addition to improving your general health, exercise can help you manage your stress levels . It doesn’t have to be an intensive gym session or cut-throat basketball game, even a walk around the block will help you relax and refresh.

8.Try a relaxation technique. Activities like yoga, tai chi and meditation can help you reduce the symptoms of stress by lowering blood pressure, improving concentration and reducing muscle tension and chronic pain, among other things. Check out Minerva, our online catalog, for more information on relaxation techniques. Try selecting search by subject and typing in the subject heading Relaxation for some great resources.

9. Ask for help when you need it! There is nothing more stressful than searching and searching for information and not being able to find it. Luckily, there are many ways you can get research help for your project. Make a P.A.W.S. appointment and get personalized research assistance from a reference librarian. You can also make an appointment with a subject specialist to learn about resources in your field. For immediate help, stop by the reference desk at any of the Libraries. Not on campus? You can get help remotely via phone, email, IM or text.

10.Accept your limitations. By nature, graduate students are overachievers. However, with all the demands on their time and attention, from classes and research projects to jobs and family responsibilities, perfection is not always possible. Learning when and how to accept “good enough” will significantly reduce your stress levels.

Mastering these techniques will not make stress disappear from your life, but it will make you a happier and healthier person.

For research assistance, contact us at 442-3691, dewref@albany.edu or stop by the reference desk.

Blog post created by Cary Gouldin

October 17, 2012

Keepying Healthy During Midterms

“You’re going to feel a pinch.” “Okay. You’re all set.” Those are the words from the nurse that gave me my flu shot today. Yup, it’s that time of year again when we need to start preparing for the cold and flu season. Although getting the flu shot can be one of the most effective ways to prevent flu viruses, it does not prevent against the common cold. Therefore, we need to take additional precautions to help limit the spread of germs - especially during that “crunch time” of the semester when no one can afford to get sick. According to the CDC (Center for Disease Control and Prevention) and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, here are some suggestions we can all follow in order to help avoid getting sick and prevent spreading illnesses:

  • When you cough or sneeze, cover your nose and mouth with a tissue. Then, throw the tissue in the trash.

  • If you don’t have a tissue, cough into your elbow rather than your hand.

  • Frequent hand washing is a simple and highly effective way to prevent the spread of germs to keep from getting sick and passing colds to others.

  • If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.

  • Keep your hands away from your face. Germs spread easily through your nose, eyes, and mouth. So, try not to touch them.

  • Try to avoid close contact with sick people.

  • If you become sick with a flu-like illness, unless you are seeking medical attention, it’s recommended that you stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone and you no longer need medications to reduce the fever.

  • While being sick, contact with others should be limited as much as possible in order to keep from infecting them.
  • Some of my personal tips to help you follow these suggestions are to always have a small pack of tissues and travel size hand sanitizer in your bag. The University also has hand sanitizer pump stations throughout the campus. Look for these locations in the places you study most. We have them throughout all three libraries -- in Dewey, you will find our dispenser near the front door, next to the display case. If you are feeling ill or live with someone who is sick, wash your hands frequently for at least 30 seconds with warm, soapy water. Be sure to scrub the front and back of your hands. If you are sick, stay home and ask a friend or family member go to the store for you if you are in need of necessities. With that said, here’s to a healthy and preventative start to the fall and winter months ahead

    Blog post created by Lindsay Van Berkom

October 12, 2012

Photo of the Week: Podium Card

suny card 0061.jpg

As you may know, if you need to print at the Dewey Library, you must have money on your SUNYCard. But what if you've forgotten your SUNYCard? Have no fear, you can purchase a card from the Podium Machine that will let you print. A Podium Card costs $1.00, and then you must reinsert it back into the machine to put funds on it for printing or copying. If you need assistance with the Podium Machine stop by the Circulation Desk.

Photo credit: Morris Stilson

October 10, 2012

Resources on Social Science Research Methods

If you are studying any of the social sciences, chances are you will need to be familiar with relevant research methods. The following four books are reference materials that can help you better understand research methods. These books cannot be checked out but you are more than welcome to use them at the Dewey Library!

mixedmethods.jpgSage handbook of mixed methods in social & behavioral research. Edited by Tashakkori, A. & Teddlie, C. Los Angeles: SAGE Publications, c2010. Dewey Library Reference H 62 T244 2010

This handbook is a comprehensive review of mixed methods. The theoretical aspect of mixed methods is explored as well as concrete examples. Written in the context of the social sciences, this handbook will provide you with information on applying mixed methods in this field. Illustrations and easy to understand diagrams are included.










measurementstatisticsencyclopedia.jpegEncyclopedia of measurement and statistics. Edited by Salkind, N. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications, c2007. Dewey Library Reference HA 29 S2363 2007 The Encyclopedia of Measurement and Statistics is a comprehensive source that will help you better understand concepts regarding measurement and statistics. The definitions are accessible and the focus broader than other reference materials on the same subject. For the general reader, this encyclopedia is a great place to start when learning about research methods.







socialmeasurementencyclopedia.jpgEncyclopedia of social measurement. Edited by Kempf-Leonard, K. San Diego, Calif.; London : Academic, 2005. Dewey Library Reference H 62 E53X 2005 The 300+ articles in this encyclopedia cover qualitative and quantitative measurements, research strategies, guidelines, and much more. This encyclopedia provides detailed definitions, articles, information on case studies, and important data sets.






socialscienceencylopedia.jpgThe Sage encyclopedia of social science research methods. Edited by Lewis-Beck, M., Bryman, A., & Futing Liao, T. Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Sage, c2004. Dewey Library Reference H 62 L456 2004 A three-volume set, this encyclopedia provides essays on relevant social science research methods. The research terms in this encyclopedia are explained in language for the general reader, making it an easy to understand resource. With more than 900 entries, this reference material is a useful tool for social science researchers.


Blog post created by Kathryn Farrell

September 12, 2012

Check Out our New Scanner!

The new scanner at the Dewey Library is located on the first floor along the back wall by the current periodicals. This scanner is specifically designed for scanning books and won’t damage the spine or create any shadows near the center of the page. It allows scans of 11”x17” and has a maximum resolution of 600 dpi, or dots per inch. This means that materials can be scanned at a high resolution, making the picture very clear. Automatic color matching ensures the scanned materials are accurate depictions of the original.

This is a touch screen scanner that doesn’t require a computer or special software. You don’t need to log in with an ID or run a specific program. Simply select how you want to scan and start scanning! It’s possible to scan directly to a USB, printer, or send to your email.

The scanner at the Dewey Library is available when the Dewey Library is open. Please view our hours page and plan accordingly. There’s no need to sign up, simply drop by the library! If you have any questions about our new scanner, please call the reference desk at 442-3691, email us, or visit the desk in person.

August 29, 2012

Study Space to Meet Your Needs

The fall semester is underway, and the Dewey Graduate Library extends a warm welcome to new and returning students. If you’ve found this blog, you’ve probably already found the University Libraries’ website where you can access many library resources and learn about library services. We hope that in addition to the online materials, you will also use our print materials and the study spaces in our building. Dewey Library is home to the Downtown Campus Information Commons, located the first floor. It is equipped with 16 computer workstations. In order to log on to these computers, you must enter your NetID and password. You will also find tables and comfortable chairs on the first floor for studying. These are located near the reference section and toward the back of the building.

Downstairs at Dewey is our quiet area. The basement area is expected to be quiet so that everyone can study without distraction. Downstairs there are a total of 24 computers with all of the ITS supplied software.

If you have group projects that you need to work on with other people and with access to computers, try the group study room just outside the mezzanine area. There are an additional 4 computers in this room.

If you have questions about these services, make sure you ask our knowledgeable technology consultants located in the Information Commons. Also, don’t be afraid to stop by the reference desk and ask a librarian!

August 21, 2012

Check Out the New Reference Books!

disaster.jpgEncyclopedia of Disaster Relief edited by K. Bradley Penuel and Matt Statler. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, c2011. Dewey Library / Reference: HV 553 E53 2011.

This two-volume set covers issues relating to disaster response around the world, including governments and NGOs, politics, refugees, health issues, and both immediate and long-term impact on economics and international relations. The 425 entries were written by experts from a variety of fields, including sociology, national security, economics, health sciences, political science, emergency preparedness and agriculture. The set focuses on the importance of the effects, responsibilities, and ethics of disaster relief and is designed to initiate educational discussion brought forth by the specific cultural, scientific, and topical articles contained within the work.

Keep It Simple.jpgKeep It Simple: A Guide to Assistive Technologies by Ravonne A. Green and Vera Blair. Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited, 2011. Dewey Library / Reference: Z 711.92 H3 G74 2011.

This guide provides a basic tutorial on common assistive computer applications and commonly available, inexpensive hardware and software to help librarians incorporate such aids into the library's current infrastructure. Focusing on applications commonly available on Microsoft Office and other low-cost technologies, this book offers guidance for the practitioner that can help every library move toward universal access. Librarians will find advice on planning accessible services, selecting appropriate assistive technologies, marketing disability services and assistive technology, and training staff in disability services issues and the use of assistive technology. Individual chapters cover print, hearing, speech, and mobility disabilities, offering resources and tutorials for each of these disability categories.

Juvenile Crime and Justice.jpgJuvenile Crime and Justice edited by William J. Chambliss. Los Angeles, CA: SAGE, c2011. Dewey Library / Reference: HV 9069 J7785 2011.

The authors of the 20 chapters in this volume address various hotly debated topics along three loosely connected themes: prevention, prosecution, and corrections. Each author presents arguments both in favor of and opposed to various treatments, programs, and punishments, examining issues such as youth curfews, juveniles in adult courts, legal representation for juveniles, juvenile boot camps, group homes and out-of-home placement. The chapters cover the leading arguments pertaining to key topics in this field and point out where more research needs to be done-which, at present, includes many of the most controversial issues in juvenile justice policy.

Law for Social Workers.jpgLaw for Social Workers by Hugh Brayne and Helen Carr. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, 2010. Dewey Library / Reference: KD 3302 B73 2010.

Written by an author team with a strong background in teaching and practice, this book provides detailed analysis of the law which protects people from harm and enables social workers to assess needs and provide services to meet those needs. Starting with an analysis of the legal system and the social worker's place in it, the authors then address human rights, discrimination, privacy of information and issues surrounding consent. Other topics covered include responsibilities to children, interagency working and responsibilities towards adults, including mental health issues. Finally the authors cover issues which affect the service user such as private family disputes, immigration and asylum status, issues relating to money, housing and violence.

Transnational Organized Crime.jpgRoutledge Handbook of Transnational Organized Crime edited by Felia Allum and Stan Gilmour. London: Routledge, 2012. Dewey Library / Reference: HV 6252 R695 2012

This handbook provides a fresh and interdisciplinary overview of the problems which transnational organized crime represents. The innovative aspect of this handbook is not only its interdisciplinary nature but also the dialogue between international academics and practitioners that it presents. The handbook seeks to provide a definitive overview of transnational organized crime, including contributions from leading international scholars as well as emerging researchers. The work starts by examining the origins, concepts, contagion and evolution of transnational organized crime and then moves on to discuss the impact, governance and reactions of governments and their agencies, before looking to the future of transnational organized crime and how the State will seek to respond.

Blog post created by Cary Gouldin

August 14, 2012

Baby, It’s Hot Outside

This summer, record-breaking high temperatures have baked the country, and it is not over yet. With another month to go, you are probably finding that hot, stuffy student apartments are not conducive to studying. If you are lucky enough to have air conditioning, the resulting electric bills are enough to make you cry. While coffee shops have an unlimited supply of cool air and caffeine, they are also noisy and full of distractions.

Dewey Library, on the other hand, is cool, quiet and puts all the tools and resources you need right at your fingertips, from books and journals to knowledgeable reference librarians. Catch up on your reading in one of our comfortable arm chairs or get take advantage of our large tables to get started on your dissertation. Our group study room in the basement is the ideal place to hammer out a group presentation or study for an upcoming exam.

Dewey is equipped to meet your computing needs. Our information commons computers are loaded with a variety of software to help you design a website, analyze your data, and organize your citations. You can also connect to the University’s secure wireless service using your own laptop or you can borrow [http://library.albany.edu/circ/laptops] one from us. Dewey also has printers, copiers and a scanner for your convenience.

Whatever your research and study needs this summer, Dewey has got you covered!

Blog post created by Cary Gouldin

August 7, 2012

Resources for Writing Your Thesis or Dissertation



For many, graduate study culminates in the production of a thesis or dissertation. The meticulous research, long hours of writing and painstaking rewrites that go into a great dissertation can overwhelm even the best students. As with most things, careful planning and preparation are essential to keeping your head above water. Fortunately, the University Libraries have numerous resources to help you plan and execute an awesome dissertation. From selecting a topic to writing your literature review to polishing your final draft, we’ve got you covered:

General Guides

Completing your Thesis or Dissertation: Professors Share their Techniques and Strategies edited by Fred Pyrczak. Los Angeles, CA: Pyrczak Pub., c2000. Dewey Library / Reference: LB 2369 C64X 2000.

Demystifying Dissertation Writing: A Streamlined Process from Choice of Topic to Final Text by Peg Boyle Single. Sterling, VA: Stylus, 2009, c2010. Dewey Library / Reference: LB 2369 S55 2010.

The Dissertation Desk Reference: The Doctoral Student's Manual to Writing the Dissertation by Raymond L. Calabrese. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Education, 2009. Dewey Library / Reference: LB 2369 C273 2009.

The Dissertation: From Beginning to End by Peter Lyons and Howard J. Doueck. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, c2010. University Library / HV 11 L963 2010.

The Elements of an Effective Dissertation and Thesis: A Step-by-Step Guide to Getting it Right the First Time by Raymond L. Calabrese. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Education, c2006. University Library / Reference: LB 2369 C275 2006.

Guide to the Successful Thesis and Dissertation: A Handbook for Students and Faculty by James E. Mauch and Namgi Park. New York: M. Dekker, c2003. University Library / Reference: LB 2369 M377 2003.

The Qualitative Dissertation: A Guide for Students and Faculty by Maria Piantanida and Noreen B. Garman. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin, c2009. University Library / LB 2369 P48 2009.

Writing the Successful Thesis and Dissertation: Entering the Conversation by Irene L. Clark. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, c2007. University Library / Reference: LB 2369 C52 2007.

Writing Your Thesis by Paul Oliver. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 2004. University Library / LB 2369 O55 2004.

Resources for Social Scientists

Doing Your Masters Dissertation: Realizing Your Potential as a Social Scientist by Chris Hart. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE, 2005. University Library / LB 2369 H325 2005.


How to Prepare a Dissertation Proposal: Suggestions for Students in Education and the Social and Behavioral Sciences by David R. Krathwohl and Nick L. Smith. Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 2005. Dewey Library / LB 2369 K723X 2005.

The Social Work Dissertation: Using Small-Scale Qualitative Methodology by Malcolm Carey. Maidenhead, UK: McGraw-Hill/Open University Press, 2009. Dewey Library / HV 11 C37X 2009.

A Thesis Resource Guide for Criminology and Criminal Justice by Marilyn McShane. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson/Prentice Hall, 2008. Dewey Library / Reference HV 6024.5 M37 2008.

Writing for Social Scientists: How to Start and Finish Your Thesis, Book, or Article by Howard Saul Becker. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2007. Dewey Library H 61.8 B43 2007.

Writing a Literature Review

Doing Your Literature Review: Traditional and Systematic Techniques by Jill K. Jesson, Lydia Matheson and Fiona M. Lacey. Los Angeles, CA: SAGE, 2011. Dewey Library / Reference: H 62 J44X 2011.

The Literature Review: Six Steps to Success by Lawrence A. Machi and Brenda T. McEvoy. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press, c2009. University Library / LB 1047.3 M33 2009.

Having trouble with a particular section of your dissertation? Looking at how others have handled the same section can be helpful. You can access works from around the world through the Dissertations & Theses database. Many of the entries in this database give you access to only the abstract or first 25 pages of a dissertation. The full text of most dissertations can be acquired through interlibrary loan. Dissertations from UAlbany can be found through the Dissertations @ SUNY Albany database. They are also listed in Minerva. Select “Dissertations and Theses (UA)” from the “Search only” drop down list, then search by author or subject.

The Libraries also have style guides to help you polish your writing and ensure that your citations are properly formatted. APA, MLA and Chicago are among the most commonly used. For assistance with citations in APA or MLA, you can also check out CitationFox on the Libraries’ website.

For more assistance in preparing for or researching your dissertation or thesis, stop by the Reference Desk, contact one of our bibliographers or make an appointment with PAWS.

Blog Post created by Cary Gouldin

July 31, 2012

Find Us on Facebook, Twitter

For many of us, social networking has become an essential part of our lives. According to a Pew Research Center survey. 65% of adult internet users report using social networking sights like Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. By far the most popular, Facebook has, for many, become an essential communication tool: from births and marriages to vacations and new jobs, it almost seems like nothing is official until it has been posted on Facebook.

A survey conducted by the Pew Center in February found that most Facebook users get more support from their Facebook friends than they give. For example, users clicked the “like” button on a friend’s content an average of 14 times but had friends “like” their content an average of 20 times. Similarly, the average users sent 9 personal messages but received 12. The study also found that the more friends a user has, the more they get out of Facebook.

Get more out of your Facebook experience (and give a little in return) by liking the University Libraries’ Facebook page. Learn about news and events, workshops, research tips, and fun facts. You can even search the Libraries’ catalog and get research assistance from a librarian directly from our page!

While not as universal as Facebook, Twitter’s popularity continues to increase. According to a Pew survey, 15% of online adults are Twitter users, up from 13% last year. The number who Tweet on a typical day (8%) has doubled since last year and quadrupled since 2010. A trend setter, Dewey Library has been Tweeting since 2008. Follow us (@UAlbanyDeweyLib) to stay abreast of Library events and activities, workshops and blog posts.

Social networking and the University Libraries, two of life’s essentials.

Blog post created by Cary Gouldin

July 17, 2012

Take a Closer Look at Dewey’s Reference Collection


Not many people think of the reference collection of their library as a place to find exciting reading. Sure, if you need to know the definition of “pusillanimous” or the date of the Defenestration of Prague, the reference section is the place to go, but if you want to learn aboutjob opportunities in Gerontology or the ins and outs of managing legal information,you are out of luck, right?

Wrong!

In addition to the dictionaries, thesauri and encyclopedias that you expect, Dewey Library has a multitude of subject specific reference resources that provide in depth information on all aspects of you field. They are ideal for laying the foundations for a larger research project. Going to a conference or job interview? Browse our reference collection to bone up on hot topics in your field so that you can contribute to any discussion and make a lasting impression.

Here are some recent additions to the collection that might interest you:

Water Politics and Policy.jpgEncyclopedia of Water Politics and Policy in the United States edited by Steven L. Danver and John R. Burch, Jr. Washington, DC: CQ Press, c2011. Dewey Library / Reference: HD 1694 A5 E265 2011.

This comprehensive resource looks at the issues and controversies surrounding water in the United States. A diverse group of over 100 scholars have provided their research and analysis of why water is so significant, tracing its impact on issues like national and state boundaries, western migration, urbanization, and the economy. This volume chronicles the origins of present-day water problems, political conflicts, the impact of legislation and court decisions on the use of water resources, the major projects undertaken across the country, and what experts are proposing be done to preserve this basic component of the environment. In addition to historical coverage, the volume also addresses many current environmental issues including acid rain, agriculture, climate change, mining, erosion, levees and dams, pollution, urbanization, and wastewater treatment.

Corporate Libraries.jpgBest Practices for Corporate Libraries edited by Sigrid E. Kelsey and Marjorie J. Porter. Santa Barbara, CA: Libraries Unlimited, c2011. Dewey Library / Reference: Z 675 C778 B47 2011.

This book showcases current practices in corporate library functions and suggests best practices for current librarians. It also examines some of the changes in librarianship that have arisen from changes in how information is provided and how corporations are now organized. Topics covered include library service functions, return on investment, measurements and evaluation, collaboration, communication and outreach in corporations, managing changes in the corporation and in the library, and legal issues such as intellectual property concerns. Drawing from the experience of 25 contributors, the book includes chapters covering corporate libraries in the United States, United Kingdom, India, Barbados, and Nigeria.

JOBSEARCH.jpgJob Search Handbook for People with Disabilities by Daniel J. Ryan. Indianapolis, IN: JIST Works, c2011. Dewey Library / Reference: HV 1568.5 R93 2011.

This extensive handbook shows people with disabilities how to overcome obstacles they encounter when searching for employment. Readers learn how to identify their strengths, explore career options, and navigate the hidden job market. They also gain tips for writing resumes, cover letters, and other forms of job search communication, as well as guidance for performing well in interviews. The handbook also features helpful information on employment laws and the rights they provide. It teaches readers when and how to disclose disabilities to a potential employer and lends additional guidance for success on the job.

Corrections.jpgCorrections edited by William J. Chambliss. Los Angeles, CA: SAGE, c2011. Dewey Library / Reference: HV 8665 C674 2011.

This book offers an in-depth look at the correctional system, outlining arguments both for and against the laws, policies and practices that make up the system, from parole and probation to the application of the death penalty. The 20 included chapters, written by eminent scholars and experts in the fields of criminology, police science, law, sociology, psychology, and other disciplines, take on such contested topics as what the goals of the correctional system should be, how those goals should be achieved, who should make these decisions and how to balance the goals of the correctional system with the civil rights of the inmates. Prison conditions and the treatment of prisoners, as well as the changing definition of cruel and unusual punishment, are also examined.

Federal Terms.jpgA Guide to Federal Terms and Acronyms
edited by Don Philpott. Lanham, MD: Government Institutes, c2010. Dewey Library / Reference: JK 421 G84 2010.

Navigating government documents is a task that requires considerable knowledge of specialized terms and acronyms. This required knowledge nearly amounts to knowing a completely different language. To those who are not fluent, the task can be overwhelming, as federal departments fill their documents with acronyms, abbreviations, and terms that mean little or nothing to the outsider. A Guide to Federal Terms and Acronyms aims to simplify the situation. It presents a glossary of key definitions, common terms, acronyms and abbreviations used by each major Federal Government agency. It is accessible, organized in a logical, easy-to-use format. Users can look up terms and acronyms by department or subject matter, making this a quick reference for translating government language. This is an essential tool for anyone who works with federal government information.

Blog post created by Cary Gouldin

May 16, 2012

Library Services for Alumni

Graduation is just around the corner and those of us at the Dewey Library would like to congratulate this year’s graduates! Although your formal education may be over, we hope that you will all become lifelong learners. As an alumnus, you are entitled to library privileges at all three libraries on campus. By registering at any library circulation desk, you can borrow up to twenty-five books at a time for thirty days.

You also have access to two databases: Academic Search-Alumni Edition and Business Search-Alumni edition. Register on line at the the University at Albany Alumni Online Community and you’ll have access to these databases in no time. You may also visit any library and access nearly all of our online databases at any public computer. There are also many free databases available online!

You may use our Ask-A-Librarian email service or stop by the reference desk for any research questions. You may also want to attend one of our free technology classes at the Interactive Media Center. These classes will help you stay current on the latest software programs and trends.

For more information on alumni services, please visit our website . We wish you success in all of your future endeavors!

Blog post created by Katie Farrell

May 9, 2012

Need a Place to study? Dewey's Got Just the Space for You

The end of the semester crunch is here! That means long hours in front of the computer and pouring over books and class notes. Many graduate students, particularly those with families, find that there are too many distractions at home to give their finals the focus they require. Others find that they can only spend so many hours cooped up at home and need a change of scenery. Where can you go?

The Quiet Study area in the basement of Dewey, of course! Equipped with computers, printers, a copier, study carrels, tables and comfortable reading chairs, this space will satisfy all your study needs. The many computers feature all Information Commons software, like Photoshop, EndNote, Access and SAS. The space is also on the University’s wireless network, so you can bring your own laptop.

Have a group project to work on or want to study with a friend? We’ve got the space for that too! Also located in the basement, our Group Study area features large tables, Information Commons computers and some comfy chairs. To get there walk through the Quiet Study area, up the stairs on the left-hand side, and through the door at the top of the stairs.

Good luck on your finals!

If you have any questions or need research help, stop by the Reference Desk.

Blog post created by Cary Gouldin

May 2, 2012

What's New In Reference?

The Dewey Library regularly acquires new reference materials. These new and interesting titles can be found on the first level of the library:

American gangsters, then and now: an encyclopedia
. Nate Hendley. Santa Barbara, Calif.: ABC-CLIO, c2010.
Dewey Library Reference HV 6446 H39 2010
This encyclopedia includes stories of famous American gangsters and gangs such as Jesse James, Al Capone, Crips and Bloods, and Hell’s Angels. This comprehensive resource looks at the history of gangsters and gangs in America and has information on famous robberies, killings, and much more.

The librarian's book of quotes
. Tatyana Eckstrand. Chicago: American Library Association, 2009.
Dewey Library Reference PN 6084 L52 E25 2009
This is a collection of quotes about libraries and the library profession. Quotes that emphasize the importance and value of libraries are compiled by authors such as Shakespeare and Ray Bradbury. Citations to the original source are provided as well as biographical information on quoted individuals.

Shocked and awed: a dictionary of the War on Terror. Fred Halliday. Berkeley: University of California Press, c2010.
Dewey Library Reference JZ 1253.5 H355 2010
This unconventional dictionary defines words and phrases used about 9/11 and issues that have followed it. Religious, political, and military words are defined. Quotes, Middle Eastern vocabulary, and stereotypes are also explored.

An encyclopedia of human rights in the United States. H. Victor Condé. Amenia, NY: Grey House Pub., c2011.
Dewey Library Reference KF 4747.5 C37 2011
With important legal cases and information on UN involvement, this encyclopedia examines all aspects of human rights. International and non-governmental organizations’ roles regarding human rights are also explored.

Getting and finding social workers jobs: the ultimate guide for job seekers and recruiters. Brad Andrews. [Qld., Australia : Emereo Pty Ltd., 2009?].
Dewey Library Reference HV 10.5 A547X 2009
This guide provides information on opportunities in the social work field and how to get hired. Get advice on resumes and cover letters as well as tips on the interview process.

If you have any questions about our new reference titles at the Dewey Library, stop by the reference desk or call us at 442-3691!

April 25, 2012

Subject Specialists at the Dewey Library

If you’ve been struggling with your research or don’t know where to start, you may want to contact one of our bibliographers at the Dewey Library. Our bibliographers are subject specialists who have a lot of knowledge in their respective fields. These are very nice people who have years of experience and are very willing to help you. They are available at any stage of a research project or assignment. Here is the information for all of the subject bibliographers at the Dewey Library:

Elaine M. Lasda Bergman
Bibliographer for Dewey Reference, Social Welfare, and Gerontology
(518) 442-3695
elasdabergman@albany.edu

Mary Jane Brustman
Bibliographer for Criminal Justice
(518)-442-3540
mbrustman@albany.edu

Deborah Bernnard
Bibliographer for Information Studies
(518) 442-3699
dbernnard@albany.edu

Richard Irving
Bibliographer for Political Science, Public Administration & Policy, and Law
(518) 442-3698
rirving@albany.edu

There is a complete listing of library subject specialists [] available on the library website, look for it under the "Research Assistance" tab.

Do not hesitate to call or email them and set up an appointment to get help for your most recent project or assignment. They are here to help and are happy to sit down and work through a problem with you.

Blog post created by Kathryn Farrell

April 11, 2012

Don't Lose Your Stuff: Data Storage Options in the Library

After weeks of meticulously researching your topic, taking copious notes, outlining your ideas and crafting the perfect thesis statement, it’s finally time to actually start writing your paper. Before you do, take a moment to consider how you are going organize and preserve you digital files. The last thing you want to face now is a lost or corrupted file. Fortunately, you have several options to choose from:

S Drive. All UAlbany students, faculty and staff have access to the S drive, which provides each user with 100 MB of personal storage space on the University’s servers. You can access your S drive from any Information Commons computer and from your own computer both on and off campus. The S drive, along with the University’s entire server system, is backed up on a regular basis, making it a safe and secure space to keep your files. More information on accessing the S drive can be found in ITS’s website .

Flash Drive. Flash drives are small, highly portable digital memory devices that are available in a variety of sizes. They are rewritable and can be used with both Macs and PC, regardless of operating system. Some flash drives offer security features such as password protection and data encryption to keep your files secure. Flash drives can be purchased from the University Bookstore, Amazon or any office supply store.

Dropbox. Dropbox is a web-based file hosting service that lets you access your files from multiple devices. A basic account, which is free, will allow you to store, access, organize and share up to 2MB of data from any computer or from your smartphone. A downloadable application is also available that will let you save files directly to a folder on your computer, which will then automatically sync with the Dropbox website and any other device you use that also has the application installed. More information can be found on the Dropbox website [https://www.dropbox.com/].

Whichever storage option you choose, there is one thing you must always remember: do not save your files to a library computer!

For more information on file storage and other technology issues, contact the ITS Helpdesk, or ask the IT Consultant on duty in the library Information Commons. For research assistance, stop by the Reference Desk.

April 4, 2012

Citation Generators: How to Use Them and What to Look Out For

Citing sources can be a confusing and overwhelming task when you’re doing research. Luckily, there are several citation generators that will make your life a lot easier. In this post we’ll discuss both free and subscription citation generators and common errors to look out for.

If you Google "free citation generator",you will get back thousands of results. There are a lot out there and it can be hard to determine which ones are the best. Luckily, the University Libraries has put together a LibGuide that lists approved free citation generators. We'll discuss a couple here, but for the full list, please visit the LibGuide!

BibMe can help you cite in MLA, APA, Chicago, or Turabian formatting. Created by Carnegie Mellon University, BibMe has an auto fill feature and also allows you to switch between citation styles.

Mendeley is another free citation generator. This program not only automatically generates bibliographies, but it is also part of an academic social network. Mendeley gives users the opportunity to collaborate online with other researchers and has an iPhone app that provides access to papers from anywhere online.

Zotero is highly recommended by the University Libraries. This is a free and open source program that can be used in the Firefox browser. Developed by George Mason University, users can store, manage, and cite sources.

Subscription citation generators are another way to go. NoodleBib is an award-winning site and is highly recommended by the University Libraries. It's only $8.00 a year and in addition to standard citing features, users can save bibliographies online or in Word, and there is a note-taking feature!

EasyBib is $8.99 a year. Users can cite and format 37 types of sources in MLA, APA, Chicago, or Turabian style. Like NoodleBib, users can save bibliographies online or in Word. EasyBib now has an iPhone app as well! With this app, you can scan a book barcode or type in the title and citations will be generated.

EndNote is a popular tool for managing bibliographies and it’s available at the University Libraries. Users can store and manage bibliographic data as well as create bibliographies. For step-by-step instruction on how to use EndNote, please visit our LibGuide.

Citation generators are useful and time-saving tools. However, it is still your responsibility to make sure your bibliographic data is cited correctly. Errors can occur with citation generators and there are common mistakes that you should look out for:

  • Make sure everything is capitalized correctly by checking the appropriate citation guide.
  • With programs that automatically input bibliographic data such as Zotero, make sure the data being imported matches the style guide.
  • If not, you will need to change the citation to reflect the style you are using.
  • Make sure to check the provided citations in databases such as EBSCO,Proquest, CSA, and Scopus. These databases generate citations as if the full text of the article was accessed. However, this is not always the case.

So there you have it! As you can see, there are a lot of good choices when it comes to citation generators. Try some and see what works the best for you! Just remember to check your citations against the appropriate style guide. If you have any further questions about citation generators, please stop by the reference desk, call us at 442-3691, email us, or IM or text us.

Blog post created by Katie Farrell

March 28, 2012

Need a Laptop?

Did you forget your laptop? Remember the laptop but not the power cord? Just don't feel like dragging it back and forth to campus with you? Don't have a laptop? Never fear, the Libraries have you covered!

In addition to books, magazines and DVDs, you can borrow laptops from the University Libraries, including Dewey. Available to any member of the UAlbany community, laptops run Windows XP Pro and include a DVD/CD read/write drive, mouse, battery, power cord and a USB drive. They also come with a variety of software, including Microsoft Office, Internet, Firefox, and Acrobat Reader.

Laptops can be borrowed for up to four hours and must be returned at least 30 minutes before the library closes. The University Library has sixteen laptops, the Science Library has ten and Dewey has two. To check one out, you must have a current Laptop Lending Agreement on file at the Circulation Desk.

For more information, check out our website stop by the Circulation Desk, or call us at 442-3693.

Blog post created by Cary Gouldin

March 14, 2012

Reference Books are Awesome

Are you writing your resume for that great federal job you read about? Want to get published in a leading social work journal? Curious about the racial and economic makeup of the city of Albany? There's a reference book for that!

Whether writing your dissertation, starting a job search or looking to satisfy your curiosity, reference materials are an invaluable resource. General reference materials (e.g. Encyclopedia Britannica) provide short entries on topics from a variety of fields, while subject-specific resources (e.g. Encyclopedia of Power) offer more in depth information, including key terms and concepts, major theories and research trends. Whatever your research needs, the reference section is a great place to start.

Here are some recent additions to our reference collection that might interest you:

The Digital Librarian's Legal Handbook
. John N. Gathegi. New York, NY: Neal-Schuman Publishers, c2012. Dewey Library / Reference: KF 2995 G38 2012.
This book provides an in depth look at intellectual property rights as they pertain to digital libraries, including copyright, content ownership, performance rights, licensing and fair uses. The first chapter serves as a general introduction to the topic. Chapter two looks at the unique aspects of the digital library and how they affect and are affected by various intellectual property issues as well as looking at access and preservation issues. Subsequent chapters focus on different aspects of intellectual property and digital collections. Designed for those with little to no legal background, this handbook makes intellectual property law and the issues surrounding it accessible and easy to grasp.

Encyclopedia of Addictions. Kathryn H. Hollen. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 2009. 2 vols. Online RC 563.4 H65 2009 WWW.
Covering all aspects of addiction from alcohol and drugs to anorexia and gambling, this guide offers a comprehensive overview of the issue, including symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment. There are over 200 entries on key concepts and terms, types of addiction, specific drugs, mental disorders and treatment methods. Entries are concise, easy to read and jargon free, and many include recommendations for further reading.

Encyclopedia of Criminological Theory. Francis T. Cullen, Pamela Wilcox, eds. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE Publications, c2010. 2 vols. University and Dewey Libraries / Reference: HV 6017 E527 2010.
This encyclopedia provides a comprehensive overview of the field of criminological theory through concise, accessible entries that explain and contextualize each issue. Entries also include a list of related entries and external references for further reading. The encyclopedia also includes a "Reader's Guide��? which groups the entries into schools, 21 in all, to help readers get a complete overview of different the facets of each school of thought.

The Sage Handbook of Race and Ethnic Studies. Patricia Hill-Collins and John Solomos, eds. Thousand Oaks, CA: SAGE, 2010. Dewey Library / Reference: HT 1521 S225X 2010.
This handbook is a comprehensive survey of the history, context and current state of race and ethnic studies, focusing on topics such as methodology, class, gender and sexuality, globalism, law and public policy, and education. The four sections, focusing on theoretical and historical contexts, social hierarchy, social organization, and debates and new horizons, provide an in depth look at the key research, new directions and conflicting voices within the field as well as an understanding of how the theories and issues discussed have affected fields such as anthropology, sociology, politics, and cultural studies.

Organized Crime: From Trafficking to Terrorism. Frank G. Shanty and Patit Paban Mishra, eds. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO, 2008. 2 vols. Online HV 6441 O745 2008 WWW.
This online reference book serves as an introduction to the topic, including history, causation theories, and law enforcement efforts and well as both the local and global impact of organized crimes' infiltration of the governmental and legitimate business sectors. The Directory of Major Organized Crimes Groups provides a brief introduction to the major players. Volume 2 is a collection of important international and multilateral documents related to combatting organized crime, including treaties, protocols and conventions.

Blog post created by Cary Gouldin

February 29, 2012

Copying and Printing @ Dewey

So, you have found a great article for your project, and now you need to print it out. No problem, we have three printers for your convenience. Black and whites printers are located on the main floor and in the quiet study area in the basement. We also have a color printer on the main floor between the flat screen TV and the new books shelf.

Want to share that great article with others in your class? We can help you there too! Copiers are located both on the main floor and downstairs in the quiet study area .

The cost of printing and copying:

Black & White: 10¢ per page
Color: 50¢ per page


Use your SUNYCard to pay for printing and copying. You can add money to your card by using the podium machine next to the reference desk. If you don’t have your card with you, you can buy a card for $1 and then add as much money as you need. The copier on the main floor takes both SUNYCards and change; all other machines only take SUNYCards.

One swipe of you SUNYCard will allow you to make 10 copies before you have to swipe again. To print, swipe your card then select the item in the print queue that corresponds to the number of your workstation.

If you have any questions about printing or copying at Dewey, just ask us. We are always here to help you!

February 22, 2012

Check out Our e-book Trials!

For the month of February, the University Libraries have access to 3 e-book platforms. With University Press Scholarship Online, Ebrary, and MyiLibrary, you can access thousands of online titles. When you’re done, take a survey to let us know what you think!

University Press Scholarship Online offers over 7,000 online titles. There are 22 subjects to choose from, including social work, psychology, public health, and law. It’s possible to search by title, author, keyword, subject, and much more. You can download chapters as a PDF file and it’s easy to print and email the material you need. It’s possible to search within a book and the platform keeps track of your searches and what you’ve recently viewed. Other features include limiting by publication year, keeping track of your location in a book, and automatically exporting citations to programs such as Zotero, and Endnote.

Ebrary has similar features to University Press Scholarship Online, but the interface is different. It’s possible to browse through the designated 22 subjects, search by many different fields (author, title, etc.), keep track of your searches, and know your location in a book. It’s also possible to download e-books from Ebrary to multiple devices, including some e-readers.

MyiLibrary is another available platform with similar features but an entirely different interface. Browse through the 20 subjects, do a quick keyword search (author, title, etc.), browse by publisher, and look at new content that has been added in the past 2 weeks. There is also a section under Reference Tools that links you to non-educational but useful online resources. Like Ebrary, it is possible to transfer downloaded files to certain e-readers.

If you look at any of these platforms, don’t forget to take the survey! Did you have a favorite? The University Libraries currently have several e-books in the collection that you may also want to check out.

Questions? Call the University Library reference desk at 442-3553, email us, or visit the reference desk in person!

Blog post created by Kathryn Farrell

February 15, 2012

Ask an ITS Consultant

Do you need help with computer software, printing, wireless configuration or other IT questions? Don’t panic, the Dewey ITS Consultants are here to help you. Consultants, who work for the University’s Information Technology Services, can be found in the Information Commons are of the library and provide expert assistance with all types of IT issues.

Their hours are as follows:

Monday – Thursday: 2:00pm – 8:00 pm
Friday: 2:00pm – 5:00 pm
Sunday:2:00pm – 6:00 pm.

If you need help when the Consultants are not on duty, a library may be able to help you; but when all else fails, contact the ITS HelpDesk at 442-3700 or visit them in LC 27 on the Uptown Campus. You can also submit a request with the ITS Service Desk.

Blog post created by Cary Gouldin

February 1, 2012

Quick, Authoritative Answers in Online Reference Collection

Sometimes you have what seems like a quick question, but you can’t find an answer by searching the world wide web. Or, the answers you find on the web conflict or somehow don’t seem right. We understand – the web is a great tool, but sometimes the results can be from questionable sources.

Of course, here at the Dewey Library and the other campus libraries, we have print reference books with many authoritative answers to those quick questions. That being said, we know that coming to the library and looking up the answer in a printed book can take a lot of time, sometimes you need the answer when the library is closed, etc. We’ve got you covered: next time you’re searching for that quick fact, check out the Libraries’ Online Reference Collection.

The Online Reference Collection contains many authoritative resources that are found in the traditional reference book section of your library. But since they are online, you now have the convenience of accessing their authoritative answers from wherever you can access the web.

In the Online Reference Collection you will find many traditional reference book categories: Almanacs , Dictionaries, Maps, and so forth. But here are some highlights that you may find particularly helpful when you’re looking for research information:

First, check out the Encyclopedias. There are some general encyclopedias but note that there is also access to the Encyclopedia of Social work, Oxford Encyclopedia of Legal History, and the International Encyclopedia of Social and Behavioral History.

Other excellent resource found on this site are our Reference e-Book Collections. These collections contain many titles that are subject specific and useful to downtown campus scholars. In particular, check out Oxford Reference Online, Sage Reference Online and Gale Virtual Reference Library. You can browse by subject in each of these collections to locate the relevant titles.

One thing that can be really complex to wade through in a general web search is statistical resources. Our Online Reference Collection provides a Statistical Sources page, which mainly provides access to government statistics but has some other reliable sources for social statistics.

Finally, we can’t forget the Style Guides. Finding the proper format for writing your paper and citing your sources is much easier with our Citation Fox http://library.albany.edu/cfox tools and other online resources providing information on all the major scholarly styles including APA, MLA, Chicago, and more.

So take some time to click around the Online Reference Collection. You may be suprised at what you find! Of course, if you have any questions about how to use these resources or you have general library questions, call us at 442-3691, stop by the Reference Desk, or Ask-a-Librarian!

December 19, 2011

Don’t let overdue library books drain your wallet (that’s what tuition bills are for)

Turned in your last paper? Aced your final exams? Congrats! It’s time to get away for a little R & R. Don’t forget to return all your library books before you go.

Too late, you say?

Not to worry, you can renew and return books from off campus. To renew an item, simply go to Minerva and find the gray log-in box for MyMinerva located on the top right of the screen. Once you have logged on with your NetID, you can renew books, check due dates and view any fines or holds on your account. Detailed information on the Libraries’ renewal policies can be found on the Circulation web page.

If you would prefer to return a book, you can do so through the mail. Simply send the item via FedEx, UPS or USPS to:

University Library Circulation
University at Albany, SUNY
1400 Washington Ave., LI-118
Albany, NY 12222

Want to pay your existing fines so you can start next semester off fresh? Contact the Library at 518-442-3601 between 8:00 am and 4:00 pm on weekdays to make a credit card payment or to make arrangements to pay by personal check.

For more information about handling library transactions remotely, please contact the Dewey Library Circulation Desk at 518-442-3693 between 8:30 am and 5:00 pm on weekdays. Please do note that Dewey will be closed December 22 through January 2; for information during that period, please contact the University Library during the same hours at 518-442-3569.

Blog post created by Cary Gouldin

November 30, 2011

Cite Sources with the Help of the University Libraries!

Citing sources can be a very confusing and time consuming process. Luckily for you, the University Libraries have several guides on how to cite sources. Our new resource, Citation Fox, offers several MLA and APA citation examples. Find out how to cite books, government publications, journal articles, online sources, and much more. The University Libraries have also put together APA Style Guide APA Guide to Electronic References , and MLA Style Guide . Our citation page provides online links to the American Sociological Association Style guide and the Chicago Manual of Style. These online resources will help save you time when you need it most.

If you’re at the library, you may want to use a book to guide you through the citation process. Check out these up-to-date citation manuals:
APA:
Publication manual of the American Psychological Association. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association, c2010. Dewey Library Reference BF 76.7 P83 2010

MLA
MLA style manual and guide to scholarly publishing. New York: Modern Language Association of America, c2008. Dewey Library Reference PN 147 G444 2008

ASA
American Sociological Association. Style guide /American Sociological Association. Washington, DC: American Sociological Association, c2007. University Library Reference HM 73 A437X 2007

Chicago
The Chicago manual of style. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, c2010.
University Library Reference Z 253 U69 2010

Legal
The bluebook: a uniform system of citation. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Law Review Association, 2010.
Dewey Library Reference KF 246 U54X 19th ed. (2010)

If you’re curious about when you should cite sources, the University Libraries has put together an online page called When and Why to Cite Sources. Here you will learn about plagiarism, why you should cite sources, when to cite, and how. This is an excellent resource with several examples that will help clear up any questions you have about citing sources.

There are also citation generators that can help you. EndNote and Zotero are popular ways to manage bibliographies. Both EndNote and Zotero allow you to organize and store citations in addition to actually generating a citation list. However, it is important to review any citation created by a citation generator to make sure the information is accurate. For a full list of citation generators please look at our Guide to Citation Generators .

If you have any questions about citing your sources you can always ask a librarian at the reference desk, email us at dewref@albany.edu, or call 442-3691.

Blog post created by Katie Farrell

November 16, 2011

Staying Healthy During the End of the Semester

Well it’s that time of year again, no not the time of years when the leaves begin to turn and apples come in season. It’s the time of year when the flu begins to rear its ugly head and conspires to ruin the end of your semester. Flu refers to illnesses caused by a number of different influenza viruses. Flu can cause a range of symptoms and effects, from mild to serious. Most healthy people recover from the flu without problems, but certain people are at high risk for serious complications. Flu symptoms may include fever, coughing, sore throat, runny or stuffy nose, headaches, body aches, chills and fatigue. Annual outbreaks of the seasonal flu usually occur during the late fall through early spring. Most people have natural immunity, and a seasonal flu vaccine is available. In a typical year, approximately 5 to 20 percent of the population gets the Flu.

Now that you have read all of the scary statistics, here are a few helpful tips on preventing the flu here on campus and at home.
• Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.
• Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after you cough or sneeze. You can also use an alcohol-based hand cleaner.
• Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth. Germs spread this way.
•Try to avoid close contact with sick people.
• Stay home if you are sick until at least 24 hours after you no longer have a fever (100°F or 37.8°C) or signs of a fever.
•While sick, limit contact with others as much as possible to keep from infecting them.

Also here are a few websites and some of their features that will help you through the flu season, check them out and be prepared!
•U.S. Government Flu Page - This is your one stop shop for all things Flu related. It has information on prevention as well as a GPS vaccine finder if you are interested.

•CDC Flu Page - The Center for Disease Control and Prevention has great information flu prevention and safety along with statistical and historical information on the flu.

•WebMD Flu Page - This page offers information as well as surveys and discussion boards on the flu and flu prevention.

We here at the library want to make sure you are well equipped to meet the flu head-on this season. Take a look at a few of these sources and make sure to use the hand sanitizer station located in Dewey across from the circulation desk. As always make sure to consult a medical professional with any major flu related concerns.


Blog post created by Benjamin Knowles

November 9, 2011

Follow Us on Facebook and Twitter!

Everywhere you look these days, you see people madly typing away on their laptops and mobile phones. What can they possibly be doing? They may claim to be writing the great American novel, but chances are they are actually on a social networking site.

While we agree with your mother that you shouldn’t jump off a cliff just because your friends do, we think that they may have the right idea when it comes to social networking.

According to a 2011 Pew Research Center survey, 26% of all American online adults use social networking sites. Of those adults, a whopping 92% are Facebook users. If you are part of that 92%, like the University Libraries’ Facebook page for information on workshops, events, research tips, and fun facts. You can even search the Libraries’ catalogue and get research assistance from a librarian directly from the page.

While still not as popular as Facebook, Twitter continues to gain followers at a rapid pace. According to the Pew Survay, as of May, 13% of online adults in the US Tweet, up from last year’s 8%. Tweeting Danes can follow Dewey Library (@UAlbanyDeweyLib) for updates on the Library’s activities, workshops and blog posts.

Give it a try… it won’t hurt nearly as much as jumping off a cliff.

For more information on connecting to the UA Libraries on Facebook and Twitter, drop by the reference desk, call us at 442-3691, or email dewref@albany.edu.

November 2, 2011

What's New In Reference?

When someone mentions a reference collection to you, do you think of an old set of Encyclopedia Britannica or the World Book? Well, you my friend are in for a big surprise, because here at the Dewey Library there are always new, interesting, and helpful titles being added to the reference collection! Prove it, you say? That is exactly what I aim to do in this post. Below you will find some of the newest additions to the Dewey reference collection; they cover various subjects and will no doubt be useful to you for simple and even advanced research needs.

A.L.A. Guide to Medical & Health Sciences Reference
(DEWEY REF R 118.4 U6 A43 2011)

Another in the long line of ALA reference guides, this book provides resources related to medical and health reference. It is divided into chapters on various aspects of the medical filed and within these chapters it provides annotated lists of print and electronic resources related to the medical field. This text even covers internet resources as well as collections of digital images. The book does focus on the United States primarily, but does highlight some international resources. This will be of great use to IST students.

Criminal Law 2008/2009
(DEWEY REF KD 7869 C69 2009)

This book covers the precise wording of the British Acts of Parliament and is written for use in course study and exam use. This is the newest update in this series and covers the most current legislation in the United Kingdom’s parliament. It eliminates the need to cross-reference amendments by offering consolidated amendments within the unnanotated acts. It also includes a highly detailed index and comprehensive detail listings that makes for easy research and navigation.

Routledge Handbook of International Criminology
(DEWEY REF HV 6025 R68 2011)

This resource is a collection of the latest research and findings from scholars all around the globe, and gives new and interesting perspectives on criminology. The book is divided into three sections covering the diverse field of criminology; these sections are international crime, transnational crime, and national crime. Within these sections there are chapters followed by questions created to insight discussion and reflection on the theories and issues raised in the preceding chapter. This is an excellent resource for both graduate and undergraduate students that gives a global look into the subject of criminology.

Encyclopedia of the American Presidency
(DEWEY REF JK 511 E53 2010)

This is the most up to date and comprehensive text on the office of the president, and offers entries on every president in U.S. history. Set up in a classic encyclopedia style with entries such as bully pulpit, oval office, and veto power. This book covers not only the executive branch but its relationship with other branches of government, elections, and even includes high quality digital images. Appendix material in this book includes images, chronology, and a guide to the offices of the White House. This is a great first start for scholars and even casual readers to begin your inquiry on the office of the presidency.

So go ahead and check out some of these new reference items, and keep an eye out for more new reference material in the future. If you have any questions about locating basic reference works for your subject, stop by the Reference Desk, call us at 442-3691, or email us at dewref@albany.edu.

Blog post created by Benjamin L. Knowles

October 19, 2011

QR Codes and Readers

Have you ever seen an advertisement or announcement that also had a weird looking barcode attached to it? It probably looked something like this:

QR CODE.png

These symbols are called a “QR� code which stands for “Quick Response� code. These codes have become very popular, showing up on everything from clothing advertisements to political action ads. So why are they so popular, and what do they do? Good Question. These codes are used to act like a barcode; they contain information such as web addresses or pertinent information about a person or event. For example, the code above contains the URL for the University at Albany’s library webpage. In order to “read� the code one would need a Smartphone and an application that is designed to process these types of codes.

In general these applications will utilize the phone’s camera to view and “read� the QR code. The application will identify the purpose of the code, whether it is informational, or contains a URL. The application will then ask the user if they would like to take action, such as following the URL or saving the information contained within the code. So, with that we get to the point of this post, to highlight a few QR code reader apps for your Smartphone and tablets. These applications are by no means the only options, but should get you started into the world of QR codes.

Let’s begin with the Android operating system, and the QR code reader that is considered one of the best for this OS. This application is simply titled “Barcode Scanner� and it can read both QR codes as well as basic UPC codes you would find on many retail products. Like many others it allows you to scan QR codes and take action depending on the information contained within the code. This application also allows you to scan UPC codes and compare the price against other retailers and even online stores such as Amazon or Ebay!

For all you Apple users out there, the “Red Laser� application is available for your iPhone, and it offers a ton of great features for code reading. This application also scans both QR and UPC barcodes, allowing you to take action on the QR or comparison shop with the UPC code. Also, because this is a library blog, “Red Laser allows you to scan a book barcode and it will find the book in a nearby library through the WorldCat system. This application will also allow you to create your own QR codes for posting to the web or printing and posting anywhere..

If you have an iPad, never fear, there are applications to read QR codes for you too! One of the best options is “Scan� by QR Code City. This application is more focused on QR codes, and makes no mention of the ability to scan UPC codes. It will allow you to acquire the information held in the code and take the appropriate action. This is a simple, stripped down application that will work for all of your QR code reading needs.

Finally for Blackberry users, there are numerous QR code scanning application available to you. One of the best is ScanLife Barcode Reader which is capable of scanning QR, UPC, Datamatrix, and EZcode barcodes. Like many of the others will allow you to create your own codes as well as comparison shop on the internet using UPC codes. This is a powerful application and should fulfill all of your QR code reading desires!

For more information on QR codes as well as other recommendations for QR applications, here is an App Review that should put you on the right track. Have fun, and explore the world of QR codes, they can be powerful marketing tools for all types of organizations, events, and groups.

Blog post created by Benjamin Knowles

October 5, 2011

Resources for Writing your Thesis or Dissertation

Towards the end of either a Master’s or Doctoral degree you may have the choice, or be asked to complete a Thesis. Theses are also called Dissertations depending on the institution or even the country you are completing your research in. Theses often determine whether or not a degree will be conferred on the person completing the work, and in general the thesis will include all of the research and findings compiled by the author on the subject they choose or are given. It is the ultimate culmination of the degree program and often encompasses years of research.

Here at SUNY Albany, there are numerous resources that that are related to Theses and Dissertations. Most are focused on helping those who are in the process of completing their dissertation. While others have more broad aims and could be used in a variety of situations.

The University libraries have access to databases that will be helpful to those writing their dissertation as well as others. These can be found by going to the library website and clicking on the “Databases� tab. At the bottom of the page there is an option for “Other Formats� with a link that reads “Dissertations and Theses�, by clicking this you will see all of the databases on this topic. Here are a few of the resources that are available through the University libraries:

•Dissertations and Theses
•Dissertations @ SUNY Albany
•Networked Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations
•Theses Canada Portal

These databases can be used to research topics not related to a Thesis as well; theses and dissertations of course contain large numbers of archived research useful for everyday research.

There are also a variety of books available specifically related to Theses and Dissertations. They cover topics ranging from picking a topic, writing, citations, etc. These resources will be invaluable to anyone at any stage of their theses research.

•Theses and Dissertations: A guide to planning, Research, and Writing by R. Murray Thomas and Dale L. Brubaker (University Library LB 2369 T458X 2008)

•The Dissertation Desk Reference: The Doctoral Student's Manual to Writing the Dissertation by Raymond L. Calabrese (Dewey Library Reference LB 2369 C273 2009)

•Complete Your Dissertation or Thesis in Two Semesters or Less by Evelyn Hunt Ogden (University Library LB 2369 O33 2007)

•The Portable Dissertation Advisor by Miles T. Bryant (University Library LB 1742 B79 2004)

Finally if you have any other questions or need more help finding resources on Dissertations, Dissertation writing, editing, whatever, make sure to visit the education Research Tutorial on “Writing Dissertations�. You will find all kinds of resources, websites and helpful tips that will have you well on your way to completing your dissertation.

Of course if you need help with research or finding guides for writing theses or dissertations, style guides, or other works to assist with preparingand formatting your document, please ask at the Dewey Reference Desk, call us at 442-3691 or email dewref@albany.edu. Bonne chance!

September 22, 2011

Use Your Smartphone at the Library!

The University Libraries know how useful and convenient Smartphones are in today’s fast-paced world. Although we ask that you please keep your phones on vibrate and take your conversations outside the library, there are many ways to use your Smartphone inside without disturbing anyone. We now offer many mobile technologies that you can access without ever signing on to a computer!

Connect to our library’s mobile website and view information such library hours, directions to the library, staff directory, and our text a librarian service. It’s also possible to search our online catalog Minerva and connect to the databases, EBSCO, JSTOR, and WorldCat. Use this QR code to go right to the site!

qr.png

In addition to the library’s mobile site, there are also many library vendors that have sites you can access with your Smartphone.

EBSCO Mobile: Access all of the databases provided by EBSCOhost as well as the medical databases DynaMed and Nursing Reference Center. Experience the user-friendly EBSCO interface in the palm of your hand!

JSTOR Mobile Beta: This version of JSTOR lets you browse by title and discipline and offers an advanced search option. It also provides citation support. Although other mobile phones may be supported, this site is specifically designed to work on iPhone/iPad, Android, and Blackberry devices.

WorldCat Mobile: Learn about what materials are available at the University at Albany and other libraries from your mobile device! There are also search suggestions that you can try such as artistic photography, graphic novels, and movie reviews.


Scopus/SciVerse Mobile Applications
: Here you can search Scopus articles and citations, view abstracts, and even set up email alerts on your Smartphone!

LexisNexis Academic Mobile: Access a basic version of LexisNexis Academic and search the news, look up a news article, legal case, or company dossier.

So don’t be afraid to use your phone at the library! Download one of these apps or browse the library’s mobile site to be connected. If you have any questions please contact the reference desk at 442-3691 or dewref@albany.edu, or stop by in person.

September 7, 2011

New Reference Titles at the Dewey Library

The Dewey Library has an extensive and useful reference collection. This collection is comprised of materials such as dictionaries, encyclopedias, and directories. Reference materials are non-circulating but can be used for as long as you need them while at the Dewey Library. Come check out our brand new reference titles at Dewey:

Demystifying dissertation writing: a streamlined process from choice of topic to final text. Peg Boyle Single. Sterling, Va. : Stylus, 2009, c2010. Dewey Reference LB 2369 S55 2010
-Learn about the five strategies related to successfully completing a dissertation.

Dictionary of social work. Martin Thomas and John Pierson. Maidenhead : Open University Press, 2010. Dewey Reference HV 12 D53X 2010.
-Become familiar with key terms and concepts in social work and the healthcare field. This edition provides comprehensive summaries.

The atlas of new librarianship.
R. David Lankes. Cambridge, Mass. : MIT Press, c2011. Dewey Reference Z 665 L36 2011.
-This is a guide to the new reality of librarianship and how it has been affected by technology. The author argues that in today’s world, librarians must enable the creation of knowledge.

Dictionary of developmental disabilities terminology.
Edited by Pasquale J. Accardo and Barbara Y. Whitman. Baltimore : Paul H. Brookes Pub., c2011. Dewey Reference RJ 135 A26 2011.
-This dictionary provides more than 4,000 disability-related terms.

Encyclopedia of cybercrime.
Edited by Samuel C. McQuade, III. Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 2009. Dewey Reference HV 6773 E53 2009.
-A comprehensive encyclopedia about cybercrime. Articles include information on terminology, national infrastructure security vulnerabilities, and the computer hacking subculture.

If you have any questions about these or any reference titles at the Dewey Library, please stop by the reference desk or contact our reference bibliographer Elaine Lasda Bergman by email at elasdabergman@albany.edu, or phone 442-3695.

Blog post created by Katie Farrell

August 8, 2011

Going Mobile In the Library

OK, everyone with a “smart� mobile device raise your hand! As you may have noticed mobile devices have become enormously popular in recent years, and with the expansion of national and global networks, connecting to the Web and other users has become increasingly easy through the use of these devices. In a recent study, it was found that 35% of adults in America own a Smartphone, with a quarter of those people using it as their primary web surfing device. In past studies only about 20% of adults owned a Smartphone, that’s a 15% increase in a very short time!*

So what does this mean for you, and more importantly what does it mean for the library and its services. It means we have to follow suit and develop mobile technologies for use in and outside of the library. Lucky for you Smartphone users the University has developed a mobile website specifically for you! The site allows you to view basic information like library hours, directions to the library, and staff directories. You can access the catalog for the library, email or text a librarian and even go on EBSCO’s mobile site. Make sure to go and check out the site on your mobile device to see all the features available to you. Even better, use the QR code below to jump right to the site!

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The University Libraries are not the only library service that utilizes mobile technology, check out these major library vendors and see what their applications have to offer!

EBSCO Mobile: Download the app for various types of smart phones and operating systems to access the EBSCO databases and services wirelessly. This app is made to translate top a smaller screen size, and allows you to access EBSCO databases anywhere at any time. Of course it also provides the same user-friendly and easy-to-use search experience that is available online, and familiar to many students, faculty, and staff.


WorldCat Mobile
: This mobile app allows you to Search for books, music, movies, games and more available at libraries all right from your phone at any time! The application provides a basic interface that allows you to search specific items or even within genres. It provides helpful suggestions as well as popular searches to guise you in your search. As always it is a familiar format translated to a smaller screen size for easy, instant access at all times.

Scopus/SciVerse Mobile Applications
Scopus/SciVerse mobile appluications give you access to trusted databases and indexes wherever you happen to be. The allow you to access the latest abstracts and articles from two of the most recognized and trusted databases, SciVerse Scopus and SciVerse ScienceDirect. There are applications available for various platforms and devices giving you freedom to choose the services that are right for you.

So there you have it, do not be caught without the information you need, get one of these apps or explore the University mobile site and be connected to the mobile movement. As these technologies become more popular keep your eyes open for the newest library related apps to enhance your user experience.

For help with mobile apps, contact the Reference Desk at 442-3691 or dewref@albany.edu, or stop by in person.

Blog post created by Benjamin Knowles

August 1, 2011

New Look, Better Functionality for Library Database Page

Did you know that the “Databases and Indexes� page on the library website has gotten an extreme makeover! Though we did not need the help of Ty Pennington[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cMJ6jSL77A4], the website will have a totally new look worthy of a few screams and shouts. We know you will like some of the new features of the page, and we want to make sure you use this page to its fullest potential. So read on and become best friends with the new “Databases and Indexes� page!

The new “Databases page has many of the features you are used to, along with a few new ones. The page allows you to select a subject from the list, this has changed very little. However you can now click on a small arrow next to some topics and subtopics will appear to narrow your search. Along the top of the page there are tabs that allow you to “Browse by Subject�, “Search by Name� and explore “Other Formats� when looking for databases and indexes. The “Other Formats� are also available as links along the bottom of each tabbed page. The links at the bottom of the page in a blue bar will allow you to refine your search b by format such as dissertations, images and E-books. It also allows you to find subject bibliographers by library and subject. These features will allow you to narrow your search and get the best possible results in a shorter time as well as get further help if you need it.

We figured we would give you a preview/walk through of the new site by doing a basic search in a given subject area, in this case we will use Information and Library Science. There is a step by step tour after the jump...

Continue reading "New Look, Better Functionality for Library Database Page" »

June 29, 2011

Librarians Can Help You with Summer Projects

IIt is summer time again, a time for relaxing, fun in the sun, hanging out at the beach, and… research projects? You heard right, with summer comes summer classes and the ever present research project or assignment. Though it may not be first on your summer priority list, research and the library are surely in your future if you are doing class work over the summer. Like you, the library staff is working over the summer, and there are plenty of ways to get help with your projects even this time of year. Here are a few of the ways we can help you finish those projects and get back out into the great weather!

Believe it or not there is in person reference help available to you over the summer. The reference librarians can walk you through a database search or help you request books or articles for your assignments. These librarians are here for you and are always available for any of your reference needs. You can drop by in person during reference hours or call us at (518) 442-3691. The summer reference hours are as follows:

Monday - Wednesday 10:00 A.M. - 8:00 P.M.
Thursday 10:00 A.M. - 5:00 P.M.
Friday 1:00 P.M. - 5:00 P.M.
Saturday CLOSED
Sunday 1:00 P.M. - 6:00 P.M.

If you need help from a librarian while you are off campus this summer, there are a few options available to you for virtual reference help. First you can use the Ask-A-Librarianservice to send an email to a librarian with a reference question. You are also able to instant message a librarian through the library website, or even send a text message to a librarian for help. To send us a text message, dial 265010 on your cell phone, make sure to start the text with “ualibraries:� then write your message (don't forget to include the colon). Keep in mind that a single text message cannot exceed 160 characters.

Our subject bibliographers are also available for you this summer! If you feel you are having trouble or just need a good place to start these people are experts in their respective fields and can help you! They all have years of experience and trust me they are very nice people and are always willing to help. Here is the information for all of the subject bibliographers:

Elaine M. Lasda Bergman
Bibliographer for Dewey Reference, Social Welfare, and Gerontology
(518) 442-3695 (phone)
ebergman@uamail.albany.edu

Mary Jane Brustman
Bibliographer for Criminal Justice
(518)-442-3540
mbrustman@uamail.albany.edu
(Mary Jane is based on the uptown campus)

Deborah Bernnard
Bibliographer for Information Studies
(518) 442-3699
dbernnard@uamail.albany.edu

Richard Irving
Bibliographer for Political Science, Public Administration & Policy, and Law
(518) 442-3698
rirving@uamail.albany.edu

So, do not hesitate to call or email them and set up an appointment to get help for your summer project or assignment. They are here to help and are happy to sit down and work through a problem with you.

There you are all of your summer reference needs are covered. The library is ready and willing to aid you with any and all projects this summer, so do not hesitate to ask for help. We hope you have a wonderful summer, and we hope to see or hear from you soon.

May 11, 2011

Alumni Privileges at the University Libraries

The Dewey Library would like to congratulate all of those graduating from University at Albany this week!! Although your formal education may be over, we hope that you will all become lifelong learners. Don’t forget that as a UA alumnus, you still have library privileges. Did you know that you can:

-Borrow books
-Register to use two free databases at home (Academic Search and Business Source) or
-Stop back into the library to access any of our databases on a public computer
-Use Ask-a-Librarian or stop by the reference desk for research questions
-Take free technology classes at the Interactive Media Center to stay current on the latest software programs and trends

We wish you success in all of your future endeavors!

Blog post created by Lauren Stern

May 5, 2011

Using the Library When You Can't Come to the Library

I often find myself off campus working on assignments or papers, and I realize I need something from the library whether it is an article or a great website to use. What is great about the university Libraries is that even if I am off campus I can find the articles and other resources that I need to complete my assignments. We students are no longer required to come to the physical library building to get the help and resources we need to complete any project our professors throw our way. With an internet connection we have access to the library website and all it has to offer.

Here are a few of the ways off campus users can access library resources and interact with the staff of the library:

More and more databases are available online through the library website. Access to these online databases and articles is as easy as 1, 2, 3!

  1. Go to the library website.
  2. Click on the “Databases and Indexes��? tab along the left side.
  3. Locate the database you wish to use by searching for it by name or by searching by subject. You will be prompted to enter your Net ID and password.

There you go you! You are off to the races; you can access thousands of articles on the numerous databases offered online through the library website. For more information on off campus database access go to the library guide for more detailed instructions.

If you need help from a librarian while you are off campus there are a few options available to you for virtual reference help. First you can use the Ask-A-Librarian service to send an email to a librarian with a reference question. You are also able to instant message a librarian through the library website, or even send a text message to a librarian for help. To send us a text message, dial 265010 on your cell phone, make sure to start the text with “ualibraries:��? then write your message (don't forget to include the colon). Keep in mind that a single text message cannot exceed 160 characters.

For those of you that are based at the downtown campus, our UA delivery service allows you to request books from the uptown campus to be delivered to the Dewey Library, saving you a gas guzzling trip. Also, if we have a journal article that is only in print, you don't need to come to the library to photocopy it. Make a UA Delivery request for the article and we will scan the article and email it to you in PDF form. Beware procrastinators, if you make these requests late at night, they will be filled the next day!

For those of you who are big Fleetwood Mac fans and would rather “Go Your Own Way��?, you are not without help. The best place to start your research is in the library website by clicking on the Research By Subject tab on the left hand side of the page. This will bring you to a list of subjects which will then bring you to helpful guides created by librarians to guide you in the right direction to complete your research needs. You can also go to the Online Reference tab and bring up a list of useful websites and databases for scholarly and everyday research.

You may have noticed a tab on the library website entitled “My Minerva��?. This is another helpful service that is especially useful for off campus users who cannot make it in to the library to perform some basic functions. This service will allow you to:


  • Renew your current loans

  • View items that you currently have checked out and their due date

  • View Blocks, Holds, and Overdue Items

  • Place items on hold or recall

  • Create a unique display for your personal Minerva searches

  • Save and access previous Minerva searches

All you have to do is sign in using your Net ID and password you can then perform all of the above functions from anywhere on or off campus!

There is nothing worse than going through a pile of books and finding a library item mixed in with your personal books. Chances are it is overdue, and you may be home, far away from campus and wanting to save gas and a trip back to Albany. Don’t worry, all is not lost! If you need to return a book from off campus you can mail it to the library.
Send books to:

University Library Circulation
University at Albany, SUNY
1400 Washington Ave., LI-118
Albany, NY 12222

Finally, if you have overdue fines and can't come to the library you can make a payment via credit card over the phone at 518-442-3601, Monday through Friday from 8 A.M. to 5P.M. If you wish to pay via personal check, please contact the billing staff ahead of time at the same number in order to determine the exact amount you owe and where payment should be sent.

If you have any questions about any of these services please contact the Dewey Library reference desk at 442-3691 or email us at dewref@albany.edu.

Blog post created by Benjamin Knowles

April 27, 2011

What is a Citation Generator?

If you were to hear the phrase citation generator what would you think of? Maybe you think of a magical website that would automatically cite all of your sources and save you hours of time. Or a large smoking machine from a mad scientist’s laboratory that pumps out citations at a mile a minute. Whatever it is that you think of let us set the record straight. Citation generators are meant as a research aide to organize and standardize your citations to help you have a more professional finished product.

You may be asking, how can I get my hands on some of these citation generators to try them out? Well, as always your library has compiled all of them in one easy place, the library website. These generators come in many forms, some are extensions to your web browser, some are all online, try a few of them out to see which one you like best!

You may have noticed a program called Endnote installed on all of the University computers; this is software that will help you to collect and organize bibliographic data. Endnote allows you to create “libraries� where you can store data on various sources and generate citations using these sources. It is a great program because you can separate your sources depending on which project or assignment you are trying to complete. Some of you may be saying, I have never used Endnote, where can I find help? This is again where the University Libraries website can come in handy. All of the information you need to use Endnote can be found on a page dedicated to Endnote within the Libraries website. This will walk you through importing bibliographic data in to Endnote, which websites to use with Endnote, and also a link to Endnote’s support site should you run into any other problems. So check out Endnote, you will not be disappointed!

Along with Endnote there are few other citation generators that can be found on the Libraries’ website that are free! Zotero is an extension of the Mozilla Firefox browser. It allows you to create folders and assign citations taken from databases and websites to these folders for later use in your bibliography. It is excellent for the management and collection of all types of sources. Another is BibMe which produces citations in a variety of formats such as APA and MLA. It also includes an auto fill feature and the ability to toggle between various citation styles. StyleWizard is another free citation generator that allows users to create citations in MLA and APA formats for six basic types of sources. It also features step by step instructions on each page to walk you through the process of citing your sources. It’s best to check out a few of these generators to see which you like the best, and which has the features and citation styles you need. Plus, who doesn’t like things for free?

There are also subscription based citation generators with great features and comprehensive services for their users. Do not be scared away by the words subscription fee, both of these sites have very reasonable rates even for the most down and out undergraduate or graduate student. The first of these is called NoodleBib; it can format and alphabetize bibliographies for over 50 different types of sources. It features MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles, and allows for importation to Word documents and note taking. Now the big question, how much it? NoodleBib is only $8.00 for an entire year of service for an individual, so check it out, it is highly recommended and is considered one of the best subscription based generators! Along with NoodleBib, there is another subscription based citation generator named EasyBib. It costs $8.99 a year for students and it can format and alphabetize over 37 different types of sources. It also allows users to import citation data from databases and journal websites. Either one of these generators would be an invaluable help to any student or faculty member doing research, they are also a steal at less than ten dollars for a whole year!

Hopefully this has been a helpful introduction to citation generators, try a few out and you will find you can save time and be more organized. Make sure to read the “Common Errors� section on the library website to avoid common problems when using citation generators. As always make sure to double check the citation, these generators are not the end all, and do make mistakes. Save yourself some time; make these sites work for you!

Blog post created by Benjamin Knowles

April 20, 2011

Dewey Librarians are Happy to Help!

Have you ever been working on a project, assignment, or paper and found yourself at a total dead end when it comes to finding new sources or references? Your first instinct was probably to delve deeper into the University Libraries website to look for any scrap of information you may have missed. You may have also gone to the help guide on the website for whatever subject you are researching. You may have even called the reference desk for help with your problem. As a last ditch effort you even came down to the library and went to the reference desk to get one on one help. All of these to no avail, so what is a desperate student like yourself supposed to do in this situation?

Well, it sounds like it’s time to bring in the big guns.

By big guns we mean the four bibliographers that cover different subjects here at the Dewey Library. All joking aside, students are encouraged to contact these people for help at any stage of a research project or assignment. If you feel you are having trouble or just need a good place to start these people are experts in their respective fields and can help you! They all have years of experience and trust me they are very nice people and are always willing to help. Here is the information for all of the subject bibliographers:

Elaine M. Lasda Bergman
Bibliographer for Dewey Reference, Social Welfare, and Gerontology
(518) 442-3695
ebergman@uamail.albany.edu

Mary Jane Brustman
Bibliographer for Criminal Justice
(518)-442-3540
mbrustman@uamail.albany.edu

Deborah Bernnard
Bibliographer for Information Studies
(518) 442-3699
dbernnard@uamail.albany.edu

Richard Irving
Bibliographer for Political Science, Public Administration & Policy, and Law
(518) 442-3698
rirving@uamail.albany.edu

Sometimes you may need to contact a subject specialist who is outside your normal field. There is a complete listing of library subject specialists available on the library website, look for it under the "Research Assistance" tab.

So, do not hesitate to call or email them and set up an appointment to get help for your most recent project or assignment. They are here to help and are happy to sit down and work through a problem with you.

Blog post created by Benjamin Knowles

April 6, 2011

The Moment…

Imagine this moment: You have finished your latest research paper or assignment. It has been exhaustively researched, written, revised, edited, tweaked, and saved. Your hand is poised over the print button as you savor this moment and all of the impending free time you are about to have. Free time in which you can do anything you want, watch TV, see friends, or just catch up on sleep. You then come to a horrifying realization: you have not completed your reference page yet! You flash back to the last time you wrote a paper, and the pain you went through trying to correctly cite all of your sources. Letters start to flash before your eyes, APA, MLA, ASA, Chicago, and you begin to panic…

There’s no need to panic! The University Libraries are here to help. We have many resources designed to help you quickly and easily cite your sources in a variety of formats and styles. Whether you are looking for help on line, or in print we have you covered, here are a few of the options to help with citing your sources.

One of the newest citation aids available on the Library website is CitationFox. This resource was created by the User Services Department and it is available for MLA and APA citation formats. It allows you to pick the type of source you are citing such as a book, article, or journal and further break it down by the number of authors or whether it is in print or online. You can then look at various examples as well as a template that instructs you on where to place the various pieces of information from the source. Try CitationFox and you will find it is extremely helpful when completing that pesky reference page!

Another great resource to use on the library style guides website is the “When and Why to Cite Sources page. This is a great resource complied by the University that will walk you through the process of citing various sources. It has helpful information on plagiarism, when you need to cite a source, and when you do not need to cite a source. It also deals with the difference between common knowledge, paraphrasing, and direct quotes and gives examples of each. It also answers the age old question, “Why cite sources?� Overall it is a great resource and definitely a good place to get started or if you are ever stuck on a particularly difficult citation question.

Finally, on this page there are a variety of basic style guides for various citation styles. There are guides for APA, one was produced by the University Libraries and the other comes directly from the American Psychological Association. There is an MLA guide created by the University Libraries and both Chicago and American Sociological Society guides directly from their websites. These will give you the basics of all of the above mentioned formats and have you well on your way to a successful reference page.

Some people prefer to use a book, especially if they are working in the library, to complete a reference page. Here at Dewey we have a wide variety of print resources for all of your citation needs. If you are not finding some of these citation books on the shelf they may be on reserve, so visit the circulation desk and you can check it out from there. If you do take out a reserved item it often has a time limit on it, generally three hours, so manage your time wisely! Here are a few of the most popular print citation resources we have at the library:

APA

American Psychological Association. (2010). (6th ed.). Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
Dewey REF BF76.7 P83 2010, also available for 24 hour loan in Dewey Reserves

MLA
Gibaldi, J. (2008). (3rd ed.). MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing. New York: Modern Language Association of America.
Dewey REF PN 147 G444

Chicago Style
The Chicago Manual of Style. (2003). (15th ed.). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
Dewey REF Z253 U69

Legal Citations
The Blue Book: a uniform system of citation (2005). Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard Law Review Association.
Dewey REF KF 246 U54X

If you have any questions about citing your sources, please feel free to ask a librarian for assistance. You can call us at 442-3691, email us at dewref@albany.edu, or drop by the reference desk!

Blog post created by Benjamin Knowles

March 30, 2011

Laptop Lending Service

Laptops can be a very convenient tool for research within the library, allowing you to access the Internet, take notes, or even start writing your paper without being tied down to a single location. Want to wander among the stacks while you browse the online catalog, Minerva? Easy as pie. Want to spread out your resources on a study table, or find a comfortable chair to work at? Consider it done.

Don’t have a laptop? Problem solved.

Laptops loaded with Windows XP Pro are available at the circulation desk free of charge for a rental period of four hours. The laptops include a DVD/CD read/write drive, mouse, power cord, battery, USB port, and internal wireless card. Files must be saved to a removable external drive, but CD-R and DVD-R disks can be purchased at the University Library. You can also set up a free digital storage account online to save any files you create.

For additional questions, please ask at the circulation desk or visit the University Libraries' Laptop Lending Service webpage .

March 23, 2011

Form: Not A Four Letter Word

When you think of forms you may remember your last trip to the DMV and you may have already stopped reading this and ran from your computer. Don’t make for the hills quite yet, we are talking about a different kind of form, the ones the library has to help you! The library has a variety of E-forms to help you to get the most out of the services provided for you at the library, don’t believe me? Here’s all the info, you be the judge.

To get to the libraries’ page of forms, start at the library home page ] and towards the top of the screen you will see an option that says “Library Services." Place the mouse over it and a drop down menu will appear. Travel down to the “Forms� tab, and now it is safe to click. You have now reached the page that will give you links and information on all of the forms and services available through the University Libraries.

One of the most helpful resources offered by the library is the UA Delivery service; it allows you to request articles and books to be sent between libraries. You will need to register for UA Delivery, but trust me it’s all basic information. After that you are set to begin requesting items to be sent to your closest library. There are a few restrictions], so make sure you are aware of these.

If you are like me you want to be the first in line at the movies to get the best seats, or first to buy the newest video game title. You can also be first in line to get the newest items available at the library! Sometimes you will come across items in our catalog which have arrived at the libraries, but haven't been put on the shelves yet. These will have the status of "On Order" or "In Processing". To speed up the system and receive these items ASAP, just fill out the form titled On Order/In Processing Request Form, and as soon as the item is available we will let you know and it’s all yours!

Back in 1990 a group named Snap! released a song called “The Power�, (don’t lie, you know the one I’m talking about!) Think of a woman singing “I’ve got the power!� and a video with men sporting some early 90’s flat tops. Well, like the members of Snap! you now have the power… to recommend that the library purchase certain items! Fill out the Recommendation for Library Purchase form and your request is on its way!

The University Libraries have a variety of forms that will help you to utilize the various services they offer. Check out the above mentioned, and many others and you will find that form will never be four letter word in your vocabulary again!

Blog post created by Benjamin Knowles

March 16, 2011

Midterm Madness: Tips for Staying Sane During Crunch Time

Midterms can be one of the most stressful times of the year, you may be asking yourself “Am I going to make it?� The answer to that question is of course yes, you will make it, and once again your library is here to help you through this rough patch. Below you will find an exhaustive list of things to help relieve your stress and carry you through mid terms and on to the end of another semester. So read on and find out how to keep yourself in the zone and out of the psych ward!

1. Start off Right! - Beginning with a positive attitude is the first step to having a stress free middle of the term. Instead of starting of your midterm worrying about all your assignments, begin by getting organized and process your assignments one by one. You will find yourself staying positive and believing that you can complete everything on time and to the best of your ability.

2. Make Use of Quiet Spaces!! - All of the University libraries have areas for you or your group to get together and enjoy a quiet study session. There are some rooms available for reservation in the Main and Science libraries, you will find all of the information here. In the Dewey Library the bottom floor is designated for group and quiet study. So make the most of these areas and get your assignments or group projects done in a quiet, and more importantly, stress free environment.

3. Attend a free Research Seminar at the Dewey Library - These seminars are free and you can sign up by stopping by the reference desk, giving us a call at 442-3691, sending us an email at dewclass@albany.edu, or for you high tech people, online registration is available. There are weekly classes (available classes) and they can help you to improve your research skills or get you more acquainted with the library. This will save you loads of time when you are ready to research because you will already know how to access everything. Check one out and see your research stress melt away!

4. Get Yourself Together - Organization is a key to reducing your stress level. Make sure you have all of your assignments in order and that you have all of the materials necessary to complete them. Keeping all of your notes, assignments, and other materials in one place can help to minimize the search for them later on. This does not mean putting all of these items in one bottomless pit of a folder with no order, but rather in a binder, or file that can be organized according to assignments, notes, etc. This will save you time, and will eliminate the 11th hour email to your professor for another copy of your midterm assignment!

6. Get in contact!- There are tons of ways to contact the reference desk at the Dewey Library to get help, and there will always be a person just a call or click away. There is the old fashion visit to the reference desk, but for you new age users here are a few of the other ways to contact us. Give us a call at 442-3691, send us an email through the Ask-A-Librarian service, instant message with a librarian, even text us a question at 265010 and make sure to start your message with ualibraries: (include the colon). So give us a call, an IM, a text, the possibilities are endless!

7. Time to Catch Some Z’s - Sleep is essential to proper brain function and in turn the reduction of stress on the body. You should get 8 hours of sleep a night and remember there is nothing wrong with a 20 minute power nap in the afternoon! When you do not get enough sleep your concentration is effected as well as information processing and short term memory. Also avoid the variety of caffeinated friends available to you to keep you wake. Caffeine can give you small boosts of energy but it also wears off and can wreak havoc on normal sleep if ingested after 3 PM. So don’t skimp on the sleep and you will find yourself alert and ready for anything school throws your way!

8. Use the “Buddy System� - Many people find it beneficial to create study groups, especially around midterms and finals to relieve some of the work load. If your professor has not already created these groups it’s time to strike out on your own and buddy up! Try to find people with similar schedules, and ideally those who either live near you, or are able to commute to meet on a regular basis. Look for motivated individuals and not those who are looking for a “free ride� to a good grade. So go forth, share ideas, and maybe make a friend or two in the process!

9. Let Us Do the Leg Work - The UA Document Delivery Service can save you a trip between the uptown and downtown campus! Sign up for the delivery service on the information page[http://library.albany.edu/services/uadelivery] then follow the simple directions to request an item. You can find articles as well as books that we can then transport between campuses for all of your research needs. So save yourself time and gas, make sure to plan ahead to get all of your items in time for your midterm paper or assignment.

10. Do Something for You! – Leisure activities or hobbies are proven stress relievers and in the process you have fun and do something you enjoy. Whatever you do as far as hobbies or activities, make sure to schedule time to continue to do these things in the midst of your midterm studies. Get out there and have a little fun, you will be amazed the effect that it can have on your stress level and overall performance.

Blog post created by Benjamin Knowles

March 9, 2011

Free Stuff that Rocks: Zotero

I love writing papers. Really long ones! I like switching back and forth between my web browser and a text document to take notes or – better yet – hand-writing everything on little note cards and then typing everything out afterwards (or maybe just losing the note cards altogether and flying into a blind panic [http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y6Q9uJCN-nQ]). I have a bumper sticker on my car that says “I <3 parenthetical citations and bibliographies.�

… Just kidding. What I do love is Zotero, a free add-on for Firefox. You can take notes from within your web browser, save and organize pdf’s and websites, and store them all for remote access from the Zotero server. Did I mention free? There’s even more free. You can get a free toolbar for Microsoft Word or OpenOffice that will generate both your works cited list and in-text citations – in any format you could ever want – with the click of a button.

For more information, watch a video , check out the UAlbany Library's Zotero Guide , or browse the Zotero forums.

Blog post created by Lauren Stern

March 2, 2011

Free Stuff that Rocks: Dropbox and Evernote

Cloud computing is a techie buzzword right now, but what does it mean? It’s actually a metaphor for Internet computing, which has evolved from basic email applications to remote server storage for businesses who don’t want to pay to purchase, maintain, and provide security for their own hardware. But cloud computing isn’t just for businesses, and there are some great free applications out there for students. Digital storage and portability of information are two big issues for students that can be addressed handily by cloud-based webware, and two applications that every student should download are Dropbox and Evernote.

Dropbox runs in the background of your computer, automatically backing up all of the files you save to a designated folder and storing a copy remotely as long as you have an Internet connection. Need to do some research at the library? Log into your account at dropbox.com, download the file you want to work on, and upload the changes when you finish. Dropbox is compatible with Macs, PCs, and even some smartphones, so you can transfer files across operating systems without an issue. Your local computer will automatically detect changes made to your Dropbox files and update them (with no further input from you required). There are a lot of advanced Dropbox “hacks,� but the portability and automatic back-up are indispensable. The free accounts provide 2gb of storage, which is more than sufficient for most student work, but people with more demanding storage requirements – those who want to back up their entire music collection, for instance – can upgrade to a paid account.

Evernote requires more active participation to save items, but it provides the same convenient access-anywhere digital storage and has a great drag and drop interface. While Dropbox is more commonly used to store files already on your computer, Evernote can be used to grab text, tweets, pictures, and pdf’s directly from the web – or from the world around you. You can snap a picture with your cell phone, send it to your account, and organize it later. Versatility is key: Evernote recommends using their service for everything from compiling shopping lists to taking notes and doing research.

Dropbox and Evernote are great multimedia tools for channeling the streams of data that surround us. Use them to save information in “the cloud,� sort it in a meaningful way, back it up, share it, and retrieve it on multiple devices.

Blog post created by Lauren Stern

February 23, 2011

Our Online Reference Collection Provides Quick Answers

Did you know that in 2008 it was estimated that there were over 180 million websites (Source: Digital Inspiration) on the internet? Now try to imagine what that number is over three years later! How are we supposed to navigate through all of those websites? Never fear brave students, the University Libraries have gathered resources from the ever expanding World Wide Web for all of your research needs. Both free websites and online reference resources to which the library subscribes can be found under the Online Reference section on the main library page.

One of the most helpful categories is the Style Guides section on the main list of resources. This section will become your best friend, especially if you are having to cite various sources, or need to brush up on your citation styles. This section gives you helpful guides for various styles, there are even citation generators included here.

Statistical sites may seem boring to many but they are really very interesting and can be a powerful tool for research. The Statistical Sources section offers resources such as the U.S. Census Bureau, and the Statistical Abstract of the United States. These resources include basic census data, but they can also tell you how much a gallon of gas cost in 1990 ( just $1.16!) or a loaf of bread in 2000 (only .99!).

These are just a few of the sections that would be helpful for researching various topics. There are also numerous resources for your everyday use such as car price guides, weather reports, book reviews, and even travel information. So check out these helpful resources before you jump into the bottomless pit of the World Wide Web!

If you have any question about locating or using some of these basic reference resources please stop by the Reference Desk, call us at 442-3691, or Ask A Librarian!

Blog post created by Benjamin Knowles

February 9, 2011

Laptop Lending: It's No Fairy Tale

Once upon a time in a land far, far away, there was a student who was writing a paper in the library. (Actually, it was last week, and actually, the land was Albany. Anyways.) Woe is me, thought the fair student, I need the portability of a laptop but alas – my coin purse is empty.

“FEAR NOT!� cried a librarian, leaping out from behind the circulation desk. “Laptops we have a-plenty, for rental and free!� Never having seen a librarian leap, the student was initially confused – but curious. “Pray tell, how long may I rent your device? Must I work the campus as a vassal?�

“Nay, dear patron, this device I bequeath unto you for the term of four hours,� the librarian replied.

“Be- bequeath?� the student asked, “What? Enough already, can I please just borrow the laptop?�

The librarian blinked. “Certainly. The laptops are loaded with Windows XP Pro and include a DVD/CD read/write drive, mouse, power cord, battery, USB port, and internal wireless card. Files must be saved to a removable external drive. CD-R and DVD-R disks can be purchased at the University Library and wireless printing is available. For additional questions, please ask at the circulation desk or visit the University Libraries' Website.�

Blog post created by Lauren Stern

December 13, 2010

Intersession Indiscretions: Returning Library Books and Paying Fines During the Break

Finals are over, and you’ve left town for a few weeks to decompress. You arrive at your destination, start unpacking your bag and find an overdue library book. Is this a bad dream?

Never fear! Library books can be renewed or returned from off campus, and you can even pay overdue fines. To renew your books, in most cases you can simply go to Minerva. The gray log-in box for MyMinerva is located in the upper right hand corner of the screen. Once you log in you can check due dates, renew books, and view any fines or holds on your account. For more information about renewing books via Minerva and viewing the circumstances in which a book cannot be renewed, please visit the Circulation policies page.

If you need to return a book from off campus you can mail it to the library. Send books to:
University Library Circulation
University at Albany, SUNY
1400 Washington Ave., LI-118
Albany, NY 12222

Finally, if you have overdue fines you can make a payment via credit card over the phone at 518-442-3601, M-F 8am–4pm. If you wish to pay via personal check, please contact the billing staff ahead of time at the same number in order to determine the exact amount you owe and where payment should be sent.

For more questions about handling library transactions remotely, please contact the Dewey Library Circulation Desk at 518-442-3693, M-F 8:30am-5pm. Please do note that Dewey will be closed December 22-January 2; for questions during that period, please contact the main University Library (uptown campus) during the same hours at 518-442-3569.

Blog post created by Lauren Stern

December 7, 2010

Burn the Midnight Oil: Extended Hours at UAlbany Libraries

The end of the semester can be a very stressful time and usually involves many late nights spent studying or working on projects. To fulfill your research and studying needs, the libraries at the uptown campus will have extended hours starting today and ending December 17th. The extended hours are as follows:
University Library:
Sunday Noon - 24 Hours
Monday–Thursday --- 24 Hours ---
Friday 24 Hours - 1:00am (1am Sat)
Saturday 9:00am - 1:00am (1am Sun)
The University Library closes at 8:00pm on Friday, December 17

Science Library:
Sunday Noon - 1:00am
Monday–Thursday 8:00am - 1:00am
Friday 8:00am - 8:00pm
Saturday 9:00am - 8:00pm
The Science Library closes at 8:00pm on Friday, December 17

Please note that the Dewey Library will be open during its regular hours. For more information on our library hours, please visit our website or call these numbers:

Dewey Library:
Circulation Desk: 442-3693
Reference Desk: 442-3691


University Library:
Circulation Desk: 442-3569
Reference Desk: 442-3558

Science Library:
Circulation Desk: 437-3948
Reference Desk: 437-3945

Happy studying!

Blog post created by Katie Farrell

December 1, 2010

Getting Help With Those Last Minute Projects and Papers

The end of every semester always brings a mountain of work that seems almost impossible to finish before winter break. Although you are the only one who can ultimately finish this overwhelming amount of work, librarians can help you along the way. Librarians can save you from unnecessary headaches and also save you time!
It is very likely that you will have at least one research paper due at the end of the semester. Stop by the reference desk for research assistance! Whether you’re just starting out or are stuck in a research rut, the librarians at the reference desk are waiting for your questions. Reference librarians have extensive knowledge on the many resources available and they can point you to the best resources on your topic.

If you can’t physically come to the library, librarians can still help!

Call the reference desk at 442-3691 or use our IM chat service. It is also possible to text us from your phone with our IM chat service, so you don’t even need to be at a computer! Simply dial 265010 and start the text with ualibraries: (don't forget the colon).
You can also email us a question and a librarian will email you back in a timely manner.

If you need research assistance on a certain topic, you can schedule an appointment with one of our bibliographers. Our bibliographers at the library are subject specialists who can provide you with even more resources on your topic. The subject specialists at Dewey are:

Social Welfare & Gerontology: Elaine Lasda Bergman: 442-3695, ebergman@uamail.albany.edu
Information Studies: Deborah Bernnard: 442-3699, dbernnard@uamail.albany.edu
Criminal Justice: Mary Jane Brustman: 442-3540, mbrustman@uamail.albany.edu

The end of the semester is crazy but librarians are here to help! Use any of our services and you’ll be on your way to a less-stressful and more manageable final few weeks.

Blog post created by Katie Farrell

November 17, 2010

A Wealth of Targeted Information: Subject-Specific Almanacs

• Did you know that the “youngest� Congressional district is Utah’s 3rd, with a median age of 25.7, while the “oldest� is Florida’s 13th, with a median age of 46.5?

• Did you know that academic libraries loaned about 11.1 million documents to other libraries in Fiscal Year 2008?

• Did you know that there are 416 social work education programs in the United States, which employ some 5,400 faculty members?

These and countless other useful facts can be gleaned from the pages of, respectively, The Almanac of American Politics (p. 1692), Library and Book Trade Almanac (p. 415), and Social Work Almanac (p. 354). (See below for full citations of these and other titles.)

An almanac is a reference work, often but not always issued annually, containing facts in short articles, lists, tables, charts, and just about any other form you can think of. You may be familiar with a general-interest example like the World Almanac and Book of Facts, which covers everything from countries of the world to sports statistics, but as we can see from the examples above there are also almanacs devoted to specific areas. When you know the subject or field about which you want to learn, these subject-specific almanacs can be a great resource for authoritative answers to your research questions, and Dewey Library’s collection has a number of these sure to be of interest to our users on the downtown campus. While you will often want the newest edition of an annually-issued almanac for the most up-to-date info, looking at older editions can be just the thing for certain kinds of research. Note while most of the latest editions of Dewey’s almanacs will be in the Reference section (in the center of the main floor), sometimes older editions can be found downstairs in the compact shelving stacks; use Minerva, UAlbany libraries’ online catalog, to locate them.

Some Subject-Specific Almanacs in Dewey Library’s Collection:

Austin, J., ed. (2009) Congressional Quarterly Almanac Plus, V. 65. Washington, D.C.: CQ Press.
Dewey Library / Reference: JK 1 C66.

Barone, M. and Cohen, R. (2010) The Almanac of American Politics 2010. Washington, D.C.: National Journal Group.
Dewey Library / Reference JK 271 B343.

Bogart, D. (2010) Library and Book Trade Almanac, 55th Ed. Medford, NJ: Information Today, Inc.
Dewey Library / Reference: Z 731 A47.

Cook, C. (2001) The Facts on File World Political Almanac: From 1945 to the Present. New York: Checkmark Books.
Dewey Library / Reference: D 843 C5798 2001.

Ginsberg, L. (1995) Social Work Almanac, 2nd Ed. Washington, D.C.: NASW Press.
Dewey Library / Reference: HV 90 G53 1995.

Lilly, W., ed. (2007) The Almanac of State Legislative Elections. Washington, D.C.: CQ Press.
Dewey Library / Reference: JK 1967 A77 2008.

Mannheimer, R., ed. (1994) Older Americans Almanac: A Reference Work on Seniors in the United States. Detroit: Gale Research.
Dewey Library / Reference: HQ 1064 U5 O416 1994.

Shafritz, J., et al., eds. (1991) Almanac of Modern Terrorism. New York: Facts on File.
Dewey Library / Reference HV 6431 S465 1991.

Blog post created by Ryan Murray

October 27, 2010

Access Files Anywhere Using your S: Drive

The S:drive is your personal digital storage space on the UAlbany server. When you log onto a campus computer, be sure to save files to your S:drive instead of to the computer (“My Documents�); saving a file to the computer limits access to that computer, but saving your work to your S:drive means that you can access it anywhere.

You may be asking yourself: Why would I do that?

1) Whether you are using Microsoft Word to write a paper, Dreamweaver to create a website, or simply collecting various media for a presentation, your S:drive can be used to collect, organize, store, and remotely access your files. Because you can also upload files to your S:drive from your personal computer, the accessibility works both ways. For instance, if you are working on a school computer you can transfer files from your S:drive to your personal computer. If you complete additional work on the file using your personal computer, you can then upload the newest version of the file to your S:drive so that when you return to campus, you have the latest draft at your disposal.

2) Having digital storage space means that you can do your work from multiple locations without carrying a flash-drive or other external storage device, which are vulnerable to corruption or physical damage.

3) Speaking of corruption and physical damage, try using your S:drive as a digital back-up for all of your academic work. You would never feel the despair of a computer crash during finals week, just before that semester-long research project comes due.

4) If you are an EndNote user, you can save your library to your S:drive so that any research you complete in the Information Commons, User Rooms, or Technology Classrooms can be seamlessly accessed from your personal computer (or vice versa).

5) UAlbany libraries give you access to hardware and software that you might not have available at home. Need a color print-out for a presentation? Upload the file to your S:drive at home, then access the file on campus and use a color printer. At the main campus, the Interactive Media Center, or IMC, has a wide variety of hardware and software available for students.

Okay, you’ve convinced me, but how do I use it?
You can view detailed directions that the IMC has provided to access your S:drive remotely via SSH (Secure Shell). SSH encrypts your information, which makes your files less vulnerable to snooping when you transfer them from the school server in order to access them remotely. For more information about accessing the S:drive, you can also visit the ITS webpage called “Using Your S:Drive�

The Dewey Library has ITS consultants on duty during the week to assist with technology problems. If you have issues with using your S: drive, drop by the Dewey Library Monday thru Thursday from 2:00pm - 8:00p, Friday from 2:00pm-5:00pm, and Sunday from 2:00pm - 6:00pm, and we'll direct you to the ITS consultant.

Blog post created by Lauren Stern

October 20, 2010

Printing and Copying at the Dewey Library

This time of year, papers are coming due and printing takes on a new importance. While you may have a printer at home, there may be some documents you need to print from software that is only available on library computers, or you may need to print in color. Dewey Library has three printers to serve these needs.

The color printer is located just beyond the reference desk, near the new books and flat-screen tv. Color copies are $0.50 per page. There are two black and white printers, one on the first floor and one on the lower quiet study floor. Black and white copies are $0.10 per page.

To print from any UAlbany computer, you must make payment with a SUNYCard. If you need to add funds to your Podium account in order to print or make copies, a SUNYCard terminal is located next to the reference desk. If you are a guest at the library, you can purchase a guest card for $1.00 and then use the SUNYCard terminal to load whatever funds you require to complete your printing task.

Photocopiers are located downstairs (near the quiet study area) as well as upstairs (near the microfilms). Both photocopiers accept SUNYCard payments, but only the upstairs machine accepts coins. Copying, like black and white printing, is $0.10 per page.

When you print at Dewey, it is important to note the computer number attached with a white sticker to the computer tower that you are using. After walking to the printer, swipe your SUNYCard at the terminal located next to the printer. A list of items available to be printed will appear on the monitor, and you can select your computer number from the list in order to print the desired document(s) and charge your card.

If you have any questions about printing you can visit the library’s page about this topic or ask a librarian. We’re always happy to help!

Blog post created by Lauren Stern

October 13, 2010

Using Subject-Specific Encyclopedias

The definition of the word “encyclopedia� with which you are likely most familiar is one referring to a work of broad scope, aiming to provide articles on everything from aardvarks to zymurgy. These works, as for example the Encyclopædia Brittanica, can be very useful, but sometimes your research needs may be better met by a subject-specific encyclopedia, one whose scope is limited to a particular subject, discipline, or field of inquiry. The sharper focus of these encyclopedias allows them to cover their subjects with more depth: topics that might be covered by one sentence in a Britannica article on aardvarks could be the basis of whole detailed articles in The Encyclopedia of Aardvarks and Anteaters. Although that particular title is unfortunately not in our collection, the Dewey Library does have many subject-specific encyclopedias that would be of interest to the Downtown UAlbany community. Some are available online, some in print copies, and some in both formats, but all can be good sources for collecting information on a topic, or simply for browsing through to learn more about your field and decide on future directions for your research.

The list below gives just some examples of subject-specific encyclopedias in our print and online collections. To find others appropriate to your specific needs, try searching Minerva, the library’s catalog, reachable through the UAlbany libraries’ homepage. Just enter “encyclopedia� and (for example) “criminal justice� in Minerva’s search box and your list of results will tell you where to find print materials or allow you to click through to online encyclopedias (if you’re using an off-campus computer, you may need to enter your UAlbany ID and password for access to online materials). Note that generally Dewey’s encyclopedias will be on the Reference shelves in the center of the first floor, and that they are not circulating items.

Criminal Justice:
Dressler, J., ed. (2002) Encyclopedia of Crime and Punishment. New York: Macmillan Reference, USA.
Dewey Reference HV 6017 E52 2002
Also available online.

Sullivan, L., ed. (2005) Encyclopedia of Law Enforcement. Thousand Oaks, California: Sage Publications.
Dewey Reference HV 7921 E53 2005

Library and Information Studies:
Bates, M., ed. (2010) Encyclopedia of Library and Information Science. Boca Raton, Florida: CRC Press.
Dewey Reference Z 1006 E57 2010

Wiegand, W. and Davis, D., eds. (1994) Encyclopedia of Library History. New York: Garland Publishers.
Dewey Reference Z 721 E54 1994

Public Administration and Policy:
Jackson, B. (1999) Encyclopedia of American Public Policy. Santa Barbara: ABC-CLIO.
Dewey Reference JK 468 P64 J33 1999

Schultz, D., ed. (2004) Encyclopedia of Public Administration & Public Policy. New York: Facts on File.
Dewey Reference JK 9 E526 2004

Social Welfare:
Herrick, J. and Stuart, P., eds. (2005)
Encyclopedia of Social Welfare History in North America.
Thousand Oaks, California: Sage Publications.
Dewey Reference HV 12 E497 2005

Mizrahi, T. and Davis, L., eds. (2008) Encyclopedia of Social Work. Washington, DC: NASW Press.
Dewey Reference HV 12 E53 2008
Also available online.

Blog post created by Ryan Murray

October 10, 2010

Dewey Workshops: 10/11-10/15

Have you signed up for one of the Dewey Workshops yet? Spending an hour in one of these sessions can save you valuable time when you are feeling the "crunch" of due dates for projects and research papers (only a few weeks away)!

Monday, October 11:
4:00 PM: Introduction to Federal Public Policy Resources

Tuesday, October 12:
10:00 AM: Evidence Based Practice
4:30 PM: Introduction to Federal Public Policy Resources

Wednesday, October 13:
3:00 PM: Introduction to Research Databases

Thursday, October 14:
4:30 PM: Introduction to Federal Public Policy Resources

You can register for classes with our Online Registration Form, at the Reference Desk, by sending email to Dewclass@albany.edu, or by calling the Reference Desk at 422-3691. If you find that you are unable to attend a class that you have registered for, please call the Reference Desk or send email to let us know.

October 6, 2010

Database Interfaces: Introduction to CSA

Introduction to the what, now? Even if the name is unfamiliar, if you’ve found journal articles or other sources using the online databases offered through UAlbany libraries, you may already have used the CSA Database Interface. (Fun fact: CSA stands for Cambridge Scientific Abstracts.) Several of the online databases most relevant to the Downtown Campus community use this interface: CSA Worldwide Political Abstracts, National Criminal Justice Reference Service, LISA [Library and Information Science Abstracts], PAIS International [Public Affairs Information Service], and Social Services Abstracts.) Knowing how use the CSA Interface’s advanced search techniques will greatly increase your success at finding resources that match your research interests.

Searching with the CSA Interface

small CSA 1.gif

When you choose one of the databases listed above from the UAlbany libraries’ Databases and Indexes page you are presented with a screen that looks like the one above. (When you’re not already logged-in to a library computer you’ll be asked for your UAlbany ID and password.)

For now, let’s focus on the series of nine empty boxes and discover how to talk to the database. (The picture above shows the page for the LISA database, but these techniques apply to any using the CSA Interface.) Notice that in each row of boxes there’s an “or� between them. When you enter terms into these boxes, the computer will search the database for items that contain any or all of the words you enter. One useful way to think about this is to put synonyms or like terms in the boxes with “or� between them. If you’re doing research on 20th and 21st century Russia, for example, you might put “Russia� into one box, and “USSR� into the adjacent one. That way, you’ll get back a more robust result list encompassing articles which use either term. The default setting is for the system to search “Anywhere,� but the drop-down menu to the right of the search boxes allows you to specify if, for example, you only want items returned that mention “Russia,� “USSR,� or both in the title of the work.

Now let’s suppose that you’re specifically looking for articles on censorship in Russian/Soviet libraries. Notice that the next two rows of search boxes have “and� next to them. If I fill out the search grid as follows as in the picture below, the search will return resources that must contain the words “libraries� and “censorship� and either or both of “Russia� and “USSR.�

small CSA 2.gif

Continue reading "Database Interfaces: Introduction to CSA" »

September 30, 2010

Ph.D. Due Date is Today

Today is the fall fixed due date for Ph.D. candidates to return or renew their books. Avoid library overdue fines by renewing your books on MyMinerva or by bringing them back to the library today. Ph.D. students are able to renew books a maximum of 8 times, and this can be done through your MyMinerva account. This fixed due date applies to Ph.D. candidates only.

If you are a Master's level student or other type of borrower, please view our circulation loan policy for applicable lending periods.

If you have questions, please call the Dewey circulation desk at 442-3693. The Dewey Library appreciates your cooperation.

September 15, 2010

The Wide Range of Dictionaries at Dewey

Most people know what a dictionary is, and have used one at some point in their lives. You may have noticed the large dictionary sitting atop one of the reference stacks here at the Dewey Library. This volume, Websters Third New International Dictionary, Unabridged, is certainly very helpful in many situations. But there may be other situations when other sources may be more accessible or helpful.

For example, there are a multitude of e-dictionaries and you can access them right on our library Online Reference page. Here, you will find English language dictionaries, such as the Oxford English Dictionary, probably the most comprehensive dictionary of English available today (even more comprehensive than that behemoth sitting on the Dewey reference stacks!).

Also take a look at the specialty dictionaries: the downtown campus may be particularly interested in the Law dictionaries (lawdictionary.com, and A Dictionary of Law ). Social Welfare Students may find the American Sign Language Browser of interest.

There are also foreign language dictionaries and thesauri which include Lexicool and Free Translation . These foreign language dictionaries will help you translate words and sentences from English into another language or from another language into English.

We have many print dictionaries as well, many of which are subject specific and are designed to help you understand terms and phrases within your field. Dewey has a variety of dictionaries in both print and online to help you with your area of study.

Those interested in law and public policy may find these dictionaries helpful:
Black’s Law Dictionary (9th edition), Dewey REF KF 156 B53 2009
Dictionary of Public Policy and Public Administration, Dewey REF H 97 S483 2004
Prince’s Dictionary of Legal Citations (7th edition), Dewey REF KF 246 P73 2006
Safire’s Political Dictionary, Dewey REF JK 9 S2 2008

There are also several criminal justice dictionaries which can help you during research:
The American Dictionary of Criminal Justice: Key Terms and Major Court Cases, Dewey REF HV 7411 C48 2005
The Concise Dictionary of Crime and Justice, Dewey REF HV 6017 D38 2002
Prentice Hall’s Dictionary of American Criminal Justice, Criminology, and Criminal Law, Dewey REF KF 9223 A68 F35 2010
National Criminal Justice Thesaurus

For social welfare research please look at these sources:
A Dictionary of Nonprofit Terms and Concepts, HD 2769.15 S63 2006
APA Dictionary of Psychology, Dewey REF BF 31 A63 2007
Legal and Ethical Dictionary for Mental Health Professionals, Dewey REF KF 3828 A934 2003
The Social Work Dictionary, Dewey REF HV 12 B37 2003
Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms (11th edition), Dewey REF Z 695.1 P7 T48

There are also a number of dictionaries on library and information studies topics:

International Dictionary of Library Histories, Dewey REF Z 721 I572 2001
Dictionary of Information Science and Technology, Dewey REF T 58.5 D499 2007
Dictionary of Information and Library Management, Dewey Z 1006 S748X 2006
OLDIS: Online Dictionary for Library and Information Science

Reference resources like dictionaries can help refresh your memory about a term or concept, clarify a term more precisely for your particular specialty and assist in beginning the process for researching a paper or project. If you would like more information on the dictionaries we have here at Dewey, please stop by the Reference Desk, email dewref@albany.edu, or call 442-3691.

Blog post created by Jill Parsons, Katie Farrell, and Elaine Bergman

September 8, 2010

Database Interfaces: Intro to Ovid

Database Interfaces: Introduction to Ovid
The Libraries’ Databases and Indexes are the best starting place to locate journal articles and sometimes reports and other materials. UA Libraries subscribes to a large number of databases. Although the content for different databases varies by subject, sometimes different databases use the same search interface. For example, if you’re using the Social Work Abstracts or PsycInfo databases, you’ll be dealing with the Ovid interface. Here are some tips for working with this interface to better help you locate the information you need.

For both PsycInfo and Social Work Abstracts, the Ovid interface defaults to the multi-field search option. Here you can enter multiple search terms and search all fields, or limit to specific fields such as title, journal, author, keyword, and so forth. The multi-field search is useful for searches which require a combination of terms in order to obtain relevant results. Place one term in each box, select the field you want and connect the search using “AND� (when you want both terms), “OR� (when you want either term), or “NOT� (to exclude a term). Note that there is the ability to add more rows if you need more than three terms.

ovid 1.gif

Sometimes you want to limit the type of material you are receiving based on other types of criteria. It’s possible to limit your searches to options such as full text, peer-reviewed, and publication year. These limiters will help you narrow your search so you get what you want. To view additional limits, click on the additional limits button, located underneath publication year. You will see there are a wide variety of choices for narrowing down your search.

ovid 2.gif

As you enter different search terms, your search history will be displayed at the top of your screen. You can revisit your previous searches here by clicking on the icon next to the word display under actions. The four most recent search histories are shown on the page. To display them all, click on expand written in red and located on the right-hand side next to the word actions. If you want to then hide these search histories, click contract which is located in the same place. You can also combine searches, by clicking the check boxes next to each search, and then clicking “AND� or “OR� where it says “combine searches using:�

ovid 3.gif


These are only a few of the many ways you can get better use out of the Ovid interface. If you need help using Social Work Abstracts or PsycInfo please drop by the Reference Desk, call 442-3692 or email dewclass@albany.edu. For more in-depth queries, contact our Bibliographer for Social Welfare, Elaine Bergman. She can be reached by email at ebergman@uamail.albany.edu, or by calling 442-3695.

Blog post created by Katie Farrell and Elaine Bergman

September 1, 2010

The Many Uses of Your SUNYCard

Your student ID, or SUNYCard is more than just identification. It has many uses on campus and is critical to using the library.

First and foremost, Your SUNYCard is your library card. Present your SUNYCard when you are checking out books from the library.

If you add money to your card, it will come in handy for several tasks. Your SUNYCard pays for printing, photocopying, and library fines.

The place where you add money to your card is called your Podium account. You can put money into your Podium account in many ways. The Dewey Library has a Podium Machine near the Reference Desk where you can add money to your account. Should you forget your SUNYCard, you can purchase a Podium card for $1.00 but then you will need to add money to the account itself. Also the Podium card simply allows printing and photocopying – you cannot borrow materials with it. To save yourself $1.00, remember to bring your SUNYCard when you come to the library!

There are several other ways to put money on your card: you can go to the SUNYCard office in the Campus Center (Room B-52), by call the SUNYCard office at 442-5989, mail a check or your credit card number on the appropriate form, or add money with a credit card online at PodiumNet.

For more questions about how the SUNYCard can be used at the library, stop by the Circulation Desk or call 442-3693.

August 23, 2010

Come Study at Dewey!

The Dewey Library offers many different study areas to suit your needs. The Information Commons] can be found on the first floor and is equipped with 16 computer workstations. In order to log on to these computers, you must enter your NetID and password. Also on the first floor are tables and comfortable chairs for studying. These are located near the reference section and toward the back of the building.

Downstairs at Dewey, we offer both a quiet area to study as well as two areas where groups can study together. If you are looking for a quiet place to study, try the basement at the Dewey Library. This area is expected to be quiet so that everyone can study without distraction. Downstairs there are a total of 24 computers with all of the ITS supplied software.

If you have group projects that you need to work on with other people and with access to computers, try the group study room just outside the mezzanine area. There are an additional 4 computers in this room.

If you have questions about these services, make sure you ask our knowledgeable technology consultants located in the Information Commons. Also, don’t be afraid to stop by the reference desk and ask a librarian!.

Blog post created by Katie Farrell

August 4, 2010

MyMinerva Lets You Track Due Dates, See Fines

Did you know that you can check due dates of materials, renew a book you have already checked out, view fines owed, and check other matters relating to your library account without calling or visiting the library? MyMinerva allows you to do all of this from any computer with Internet access. Located within the library’s online catalog, My Minerva is your one stop shop for everything pertaining to your library account.

To access your account, first go to Minerva, the library catalog. MmMinerva is located in the top right corner of the Minerva catalog search screen. My Minerva. Enter your Net ID and Password and click Log On.

myminerva.jpg

This is the sign-in box for MyMinerva

Once you have logged in to My Minerva, you will see the current status of your account. At a glance, you will be able to see the number of items that are currently checked out, how many books have been recently returned to the library, if you have placed a recall on any library materials, and the balance on your account. If you want to see more detailed information on any of these activities, simply click on the corresponding item. To renew a book that is already checked out, for example, you would click on the number next to the Loans category to see the list of books that are currently checked out. From there, click on the particular book you would like to renew, then on the next screen click Renew.

If you have any questions or need help logging in to your My Minerva account, you can stop by the Reference Desk, give us a call at 442-3691, email us through the Ask-A-Librarian service, or visit NetID's in the University Libraries for more information.

August 2, 2010

Need Help Writing Your Thesis?

If you’re working on your master’s thesis or doctoral dissertation, you’ll know that it requires a lot of hard work. Here at the Dewey Library, we can help ease the strain of research with our many useful sources. The following are some resources you can find at Dewey:

McShane, Marilyn. A thesis resource guide for criminology and criminal justice. Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Pearson/Prentice Hall, 2008. Dewey Library / Reference HV 6024.5 M37 2008

Pyrczak, Fred. Completing your thesis or dissertation : professors share their techniques and strategies. Los Angeles, CA : Pyrczak Pub., 2000. Dewey Library / Reference LB 2369 C64X 2000

Mauch, James E. Guide to the successful thesis and dissertation a handbook for students and faculty. New York: M. Dekker, 2003. Dewey Library / Reference LB 2369 M377 2003

Becker, Howard Saul. Writing for social scientists : how to start and finish your thesis, book, or article. Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2007. Dewey Library H 61.8 B43 2007

Carey, Malcolm. The social work dissertation : using small-scale qualitative methodology. Maidenhead, UK: McGraw-Hill/Open University Press, 2009. Dewey Library HV 11 C37X 2009

Krathwohl, David R. How to prepare a dissertation proposal : suggestions for students in education and the social and behavioral sciences. Syracuse, N.Y. : Syracuse University Press, 2005. Dewey Library LB 2369 K723X 2005

The University Libraries also has access to many dissertations in electronic form. The Dissertations @ SUNY Albany database provides access to dissertations written by former UAlbany students. This database provides full-text access to dissertations written from 1997 to present and abstracts of dissertations from 1988 to present.
The other resource is Dissertations & Theses . Unlike Dissertations @ SUNY Albany, which only contains dissertations written by former members of UAlbany, Dissertations & Theses contains dissertations written by students from schools across the country. Complete full text access is not available for non UAlbany dissertations, but many records include the first 25 pages, and there is abstracting from 1980 to present.

It’s also possible to search dissertations in Minerva. Select the Dissertations and Theses (UA) tab and search by author, title or any combination of the two. Most theses and dissertations are available on microfilm in the University Library. Print copies of University at Albany dissertations from 1914 to the present are available in the Special Collections department, but they must be used on-site.

The guides “Writing and Presenting your Thesis, “How to Write your Thesis�, and “Thesis Statements� are all helpful websites.

If you need more assistance please visit the Graduate Studies Office for Dissertation Submittal Policies and Guidelines [http://www.albany.edu/gradstudies/degreecomp/d2.shtml]. For research assistance, stopping by the Reference Desk, call us at 442-3691, or make an appointment with a librarian who the Subject Specialist in your discipline.

Blog post created by Katie Farrell

July 26, 2010

Out of Town? Renew and Return Books, Pay Fines Remotely

Many times, students and faculty members receive messages while they are out of town that a book or other library material is overdue or has been recalled. If this happens to you, have no fear! We have several ways for you to handle library transactions while you are out of town.

First, if you need to renew your books, simply go to Minerva, the library catalog. In the upper right hand corner of the search screen, you will see the login box for MyMinerva. MyMinerva is where you can check due dates, renew books and view any finds or holds on your account.

If your books are due and you can't come to the library, you can return books through the mail, you may use USPS, FedEx, or UPS. Send books to:

University Library Circulation
University at Albany, SUNY
1400 Washington Ave., LI-118
Albany, NY 12222

Finally, if you have overdue fines, you can can make fine payments with a credit card over the phone, by contacting billing staff at 442-3601 (Monday–Friday 8am–4pm). You can also pay by check, but you should call the billing staff ahead of time to determine exact amount and where to send payment.

For more questions about handling library transactions remotely, please contact Dewey's Circulation Desk at 442-3693.

Content provided by Kabel Nathan Stanwicks

July 14, 2010

Printing from Dewey Computers

Some of the most frequent questions we get at the Dewey Library are about printing. We thought we'd explain how printing works at Dewey to help with those questions.

We offer both color and black and white printing: black and white printing costs ten cents per page and color printing costs fifty cents per page.

You must have money on your SUNYCard or Podium card in order to print. In order to add money to your card there is a SUNYCard terminal by the reference desk, you can do it online, or you can visit the SUNYCard office (442-5989, Campus Center B52). If you forgot your SUNYCard and need to print you can buy a Podium card for one dollar but money for printing must also be added.

There are two black and white printers, one located on the main floor in the Information Commons and one in the basement. The color printer is located on the main floor behind the slide show screen.

Once you’ve added money to your card and selected print (DeweyLibBW for black and white or DeweyLibColor for color), you must swipe your card at the printer terminal. The monitor will display all jobs in the print queue. Select your job, and click print. Remember to log out of the Uniprinter right away so that others cannot use your account to pay for their print jobs. Your document should come out of the printer, provided there was enough money on your card to pay for the job.

If you have problems printing, check with the ITS consultant on duty. He or she is sitting next to the printer in the Information Commons area on the main floor, and will have a sign on his or her terminal. When there is no ITS consultant on duty, check at the reference desk or circulation desk for assistance.

Blog post created by Katie Farrell

July 12, 2010

Off Campus Services

No longer is it a requirement for patrons to physically enter the library in order to access our many online databases and resources. You can now do research, renew books, and perform many other library related tasks from wherever you are, whenever you feel like it!

Here are just a few of the ways you can use the library when you're not actually at the library:

Get articles and more online. Each year, more and more of the library's resources become available online. Go to the library website, click on Databases and Indexes, and locate the database you wish to search. When you click on the desired database, instead of immediately entering the database, you will be prompted to enter your Net ID and password. For a more detailed explanation of how to remotely access library databases, please visit Off-Campus Access Instructions for Databases and Online Journals.

In addition to our databases, there are many other ways to receive research help and assistance from off campus. First there is the Ask-A-Librarian service, where you can have a Reference Librarian provide you with research assistance via email. You can also have your questions answered through our Instant Messaging service, or you can text a librarian. To send us a text message, on your cell phone dial 265010, start the text with “ualibraries:��? then write your message (don't forget to include the colon). Keep in mind that a single text message cannot exceed 160 characters.

For more research help take advantage of the Research by Subject and Online Reference Collection pages within the University Libraries’ website. Also, don’t forget University Libraries’ Minerva catalog is available to you from any computer with an internet connection.

If you are based at the downtown campus, our UA Delivery service allows you to request that books from the uptown campus be delivered to the Dewey Library, saving you a trip. Also, if we have a journal article that is only in print, you don't need to come to the library to photocopy it. Make a UA Delivery request for the article and we will scan the article and email it to you in PDF form. If you make these requests late at night, they will be filled the next day!

If you have any questions or need assistance with remote access to the library databases or any other library resource, please refer to NetID’s in the University Libraries or Troubleshooting FAQ for Off-Campus Access for more information.

Blog post created by Katie Farrell

July 7, 2010

The Item You Want is Checked Out? Recall It!

Do you need an item that’s checked out to someone else? It’s possible to recall ] this item through Minerva, the library catalog. First, search for the item in Minerva, and take a look at it's brief record, with information like the title, author, date, and location. Here is an example:

recall blog 1 cropped.jpg

You will notice the call number in the Location field is a link. Click that link. You will be taken to a screen with information about the availability of this item. If there is a date in the Status field, the item is checked out and you can click the "Recall This Item" link on the far right:

recall blog 2 circle.jpg

You will then need to sign in with Net ID and password. Simply fill out the next form, and you are done! The patron who has the item will be notified that he or she has to return it in 14 days. You will then receive a notice when the item has been returned and is available for pick up.

You are limited to 10 active recall requests and any item you check out can be recalled by others. Please note that if you have an item and someone recalls it, there is a fine of $1.50/day per item if returned after the 14 days.
If you have any questions you can always ask a librarian!

Blog post created by Katie Farrell

May 20, 2010

The University Libraries are Here to Help, even After Graduation!

A common misconception among many newly degreed students is that once they have graduated, their alma mater can no longer help the with their future endeavors. Wrong! In addition to the many services provided by the Alumni Association, such as Career Services from Alumni and Test Preparation Courses for the GRE, LAST, and GMAT standardized tests, the University Libraries offer many different services to help support the hard-working and dedicated members of our prestigious Alumni Association.

Our newest service that is available to University Alumni is that we now subscribe to two research databases designed for alumni use. It is important to note that in order to access these databases, alumni must first register for a username and password from the University at Albany Alumni Online Community. The first of these databases is Academic Search – Alumni Edition . This multidisciplinary database, which is specifically designed to meet the research needs of the post-graduate professional, allows alumni to search for full text articles from over 3,300 journals. The other database is Business Source – Alumni Edition . Specializing in the research of all areas of business, this database is similarly designed to satisfy the research needs of the post-college business professional, and provides full text access to over 1,400 business magazines and journals. A comprehensive list of databases and sources available for alumni can be found on the Alumni Services – Database List.

University alumni are entitled to borrowing privileges from each of our three libraries. Alumni are granted a 30 day loan period for circulating books, can check out up to 25 items at a time, and items that are checked out may be renewed twice. Registration for Alumni Borrowing Privileges can be completed at the circulation desk at any of our three libraries. Since the library has to verify your status in the University Registrar’s Alumni database, it is recommended you come to the library to register during regular business hours, when staff with access to the database is available.

The Interactive Media Center, located in room B41 of the University Library, frequently hosts classes and workshops on a variety of technology related topics. Some of the topics covered in these sessions include image and text scanning, creating PDF files, web design, video digitizing, and Adobe Photoshop applications. Each class is 100% free to all UAlbany students, faculty, staff, and alumni. Alumni can register for a workshop via the Class Schedule and Registration Form. Walk-ins are also welcome, so if you decide at the last minute to attend a workshop, feel free to swing by the Interactive Media Center whenever a class is in session!

Lastly is the Ask-A-Librarian Email Reference Service. Alumni are encouraged to fill out the Ask-A-Librarian form with any and all of their information questions. One of our talented librarians will respond to your query in a timely fashion. A great resource when you need a detailed and expedient answer to a question from a trained professional!

For more information on the many services the University Libraries provide for UAlbany alum, please visit the University Libraries Alumni Services page.

Blog post created by Matthew Laudicina

May 17, 2010

Not Owned by UA Libraries? Not a Problem!

The total combined collection size of all three libraries and the Special Collections, (currently at over two million volumes) allows the University Libraries to provide coverage for a broad range of subjects and areas of study. At the same time, it would be unrealistic for one institution to be able to offer resources and information for every conceivable research topic or information need of its patrons. Here at UAlbany, the University Libraries offer several services to students, faculty, and staff to help them loan materials not owned by our libraries. These services are crucial as a means of “filling in the gaps� of our collections, and we strongly encourage you to take advantage of them when they are needed.

Perhaps the most ubiquitous and easy to use of these services is Interlibrary Loan . The Interlibrary Loan Department is able to offer short term loans of books and digital delivery of journal articles from libraries nationwide that the University Libraries do not already own. Some of the types of materials that can be requested through Interlibrary Loan include books and book chapters, journal articles, dissertations, audio/visual materials, and newspaper and archival materials on microfilm. If you have never used Interlibrary Loan before, you first need to complete the First Time User Registration Form. Once you have created an account, all you need is the citation information of the item you would like to request through Interlibrary Loan. If the item you request is a book, audio/visual material like a DVD or CD, or any other type of physical media, you can pick it up once it has been delivered to your designated pick-up library. Journal articles requested through Interlibrary Loan will be delivered electronically to your email inbox. Further information regarding Interlibrary Loan can be found on the Interlibrary Loan FAQ.

Another service that the University Libraries are participating members is the Direct Access Program. Sponsored by the Capital District Library Council (CDLC), the Direct Access Program enables members of the UAlbany community to borrow from or use over fifty academic, public, law, medical, and technical libraries located in the Capital District. In order to make use of the CDLC Direct Access Program, you first need to pick up a CDLC Card, which you can get from the Circulation Desk at any of our libraries. For more information on the CDLC Direct Access Program, including a directory of participating libraries, please the visit the CDLC – Direct Access Program web site.

In addition to the services already mentioned, the University Libraries also provide Reciprocal Access to Research Collections and programs. These services include participation in the SUNY sponsored Open Access Program and the OCLC Reciprocal Faculty Borrowing Program from participating institutions, as well as borrowing privileges for UAlbany faculty and staff at the New York State Library and the Center for Research Libraries in Chicago. Please visit Reciprocal Access to Research Collections for more information about each of these services.

If you have any questions about any of these resources, such as how to use them and how they can help you with your research, you can give us a call at 442-3691, send us an email through the Ask-A-Librarian Service, or stop by the Reference Desk.

Blog post created by Matthew Laudicina

April 14, 2010

Count on Resources about the United States Census

A topic that has been at the forefront of the news in recent weeks is the United States’ decennial census. On the outset of each decade, the United States Census Bureau collects data in an effort to count every resident in the United States. An accurate and up-to-date count of the United States population serves two essential purposes. The first is to help apportion the approximately $400 billion in federal funds to communities across the country. These funds are used to help maintain and improve a vast array of social and economic programs and many other elements of the country’s infrastructure that require money for creation, development, and upkeep. The other essential function of the census is that when the state populations are updated, the data is then used to determine the representation of each state in the U.S. House of Representatives, allocate Congressional seats, the number of electoral votes for each state, and government program funding. As you can see, the census plays a vital role in both the economic and political development of the United States on a decennial basis.

While the census is often viewed as an endeavor of national importance, the results of the census will absolutely have a significant impact on a local level. Right here in the Albany community and the University at Albany, it is critical that everyone, especially on-campus and off-campus students who only reside in Albany while classes are in session, be accounted for by the U.S. Census Bureau.

On-campus students will receive Census forms in their residence halls during the week of April 12th, and UAlbany residence hall staff will distribute the forms and collect the completed ones for return to Census officials.

Off-campus students will receive a Census form in the mail. Only one form will be sent to each residency, so be sure that all of your roommates, if you have any, are represented on the form. Return the completed Census form in a self addressed stamped envelope by April 15th, 2010.

If you are interested in finding out more information about the Census, you can find a wealth of information and census statistics through the Libraries’ website. To get to the census data in our government documents online resources, click on “Research by Subject,� then click “Government Information,� followed by "Internet Resources – United States. On this page, scroll down until you reach the section on Census materials. You should be able to find nearly any piece of data from any of the previous censuses, starting with 2000 and going all the way back to the very first census in 1790.

Let’s say you were interested in the total population and social characteristics of the state capital of New York, based on the data from the 2000 census. You would first want to enter the American FactFinder . In the Fact Sheet box towards the top of the page, type in Albany and click “Go.� Once you click on the link to Albany, be sure to click on the tab for the 2000 census, as the page defaults to data collected from the 2006-2008 American Community Survey and not the 2000 census. From there, you can find all of the pertinent data to satisfy your information needs.

The process for finding much older and highly specific data from previous censuses is just as easy as finding data from the 2000 census. As an example, let’s say you needed to find out the number of families in Suffolk County, Massachusetts, according to the 1790 census. The first step would be to enter the page for the 1790-2000 Census of Population and Housing, click on the link to the 1790 Census(, then click on the PDF link next to “Return of the whole number of persons within the several districts of the United States...". On the 21st page of the PDF document, you will find various detailed data, including the total number of families, for Suffolk County, Massachusetts and each town within the county.

The University Libraries have many books discussing the United States Census, its history, the process of collecting the data, and how to interpret the data. Some of these books include, but are not limited to, the following titles:

Anderson, Margo J. The American Census: a Social History. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1988.
University Library / HA 37 U55 A53 1988

Anderson, Margo J. Encyclopedia of the U.S. Census. Washington, DC: CQ, 2000.
Dewey Library / Reference HA 37 U55 C66 2000

Hillygus, D. Sunshine. The Hard Count: the Political and Social Challenges of Census Mobilization. New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 2006.
University Library / HA 181 H37 2006

Lavin, Michael R. Understanding the Census: a Guide for Marketers, Planners, Grant Writers, and Other Data Users. Kenmore, N.Y.: Epoch, 1996.
Dewey Library / Reference HA 37 U55 L38X 1995

Riche, Martha Farnsworth., and Deirdre Gaquin. The Who, What, and Where of America: Understanding the Census Results. Lanham, MD: Bernan, 2003.
Dewey Library / Reference HA 201.122 W46X 2003

If you have any questions or need assistance with conducting research with census data, please get in touch with a librarian at the Reference Desk. You can give us a call at 442-3691, send an email through the Ask-A-Librarian Service, or stop by the Reference Desk.


Blog post created by Matthew Laudicina

April 7, 2010

When the Book You Want Isn't On the Shelf

As you may or may not know, there is a collection of online forms available to all UAlbany students, faculty, and staff that can be used to request certain services from the libraries. Some of these services include requesting an item for library purchase, the UA Delivery of inter-campus books and articles, and Library Instruction and Reserve service forms for Faculty and Teaching Assistants. Here is an overview of some of these forms.

First is the On Order/In Processing Request Form Occasionally, Minerva will list the Loan Type and Status of a particular book as being “On Order,� “In Processing,� “In Cataloging Backlog,� or “Under Consideration.� If you are interested in checking out a book with one of these statuses previously listed, all you need to do is fill out the On Order/In Processing Request Form, and library staff will contact you when the book is available.

Next is the Recommendation for Library Purchase Form. As the name would suggest, patrons can use this form to recommend an item to be purchased by the University Libraries and added to the collection. Before submitting a recommendation for purchase, be sure to check Minerva to make sure the Libraries do not already own the item. Once submitted, your request will be sent to the appropriate subject specialist llibrarian for consideration.

Another form available to university members is the Not on Shelf Form. Users can complete and submit this form to report an item that is not on the shelf when or where Minerva indicates it should be available. Additionally, this form can also be used to request an item that is currently listed as being “On Order,� “In Processing,� “Under Consideration,� and the like, much like the On Order/In Processing Form. Before submitting the Not on Shelf Form, be sure to ask for assistance at the Circulation Desk. Staff can determine if the item was recently returned, explore other possibilities, and double-check the shelf location.

One form that has migrated to being a feature within Minerva is the Recall Service. If there is a book or other library item that is currently checked out that you urgently need, make use of the “Recall this Item� option within Minerva. To request a recall for an item, search for the item that is currently checked out in Minerva, and click the “Recall this Item� option. Next, enter your Net ID and password and enter MyMinerva. From the Create Request Recall window, choose which of the three University Libraries where you would like to pick up the item, and enter the date at which the item is no longer needed. Once the request is completed, you will receive a notice when the item has been returned and is available for pick up. For more information on recalling an item, there is the Recall Services page, and for detailed instructions on how to complete the Recall Request within Minerva, please visit How to Recall Items Through the Minerva Online Catalog.

Please visit Request Forms under the Services tab of the University Libraries homepage for a complete list of all the library request forms, and remember to Ask-a-Librarian if you need assistance!

Blog post created by Matthew Laudicina

March 31, 2010

Who Cited What? An Introduction to Cited Reference Searching

Cited references are the articles, books, and other resources that are listed in the bibliography or works cited page of an individual article or resource. Ciited references are helpful for finding additional resources on a particular topic, identifying top researchers in a field of study, and for decisions regarding faculty tenure. Many universities use cited reference searching as a tool for evaluating the research quality of its faculty members. The main idea regarding the value of conducting this type of search is that authors with higher instances of being cited have made a significant contribution to their academic field.

Citation databases index articles that have been cited in a work, as well as those which have cited the work itself, allowing users to follow the instances where a reference or author has been cited. This technique can help users find out how many times and where a publication is being cited, who is referencing a particular resource, how a particular research topic is used to support other research, as well as track the research of an individual.

The primary online database used for citation reference searching subscribed to by the UA Libraries is Scopus. Scopus covers over 15,000 journals and provides comprhensive coverage of resources published since 1996 and selective coverage of earlier works. In addition to finding out what was cited in a paper or who cited a paper, Scopus also can provide such metrics as: the value of weighted citations per document, differences in the frequency of citation across research fields, total number of citations received by a journal for a given year, total number of documents published by the journal each year, and percentage of documents in that year that have never been cited to date.

For citation searches for works published prior to 1996, please contact the Dewey Reference desk and ask to set up an appointment for a DIALOG search. The reference desk phone number is 442-3691.

CSA Worldwide Political Science Abstracts provides coverage of a wide range of political science journals dating back to 1975. To find citing references, enter the author’s last name and first initial, then select “References� from the pull down menu.

Another database that facilitates citation reference searching is PsycINFO. This database is a key resource for conducting research within the psychology discipline. To conduct citation reference searching within PsycINFO, type the author’s last name and first initial, then select “Author� from the pull down menu. At the end of each citation is a Citing Articles button. Click this button at the bottom of each record, which will locate articles that cite the record.

Other social science databases that provide citation reference searching include:

• Academic Search Complete: To search for cited references, click on “Cited References� on the blue menu bar.

• ScienceDirect: For cited references, select “Advanced Search�, then search author or title within “References�.

• Sociological Abstracts: For cited references, use “Advanced Search� to select “References, RE=�, in the right-hand pull-down list.

Be aware however, that these databases only track citations within their own indexed holdings, and may not be as comprehensive as Scopus or the Social Sciences Citation Index, available in print through 2007 at Social Science Citation Index: Dewey Library / Reference H 1 Z999 S63 or by requesting a DIALOG search.

For additional assistance and information on citation reference searching, as well as help with make the most of Scopus and other resources, please contact Elaine Bergman. She can be reached by email at mailto:ebergman@uamail.albany.edu or by calling 442-3695. You can also visit Citation Searching at UA Libraries for more information.

Blog post created by Matthew Laudicina and Elaine Bergman

March 24, 2010

Key Resources for Locating and Writing Dissertations

For many students charged with the task of writing their dissertation, the mere thought of tackling such a demanding and intense undertaking is enough to induce a panic attack. While the idea of waking up one day with a completed and superlative dissertation may seem closer to a dream than a reality at the outset of the dissertation writing experience, there are many resources available to help you through this long and arduous process. If you currently find yourself embarking on the journey of writing your dissertation, or plan to in the near future, this blog entry is especially for you!

To see what dissertations have been completed is a three step process:

* Search comprehensive databases for dissertations,
* Look at the subject databases for your discipline, and
* Look at UAlbany dissertations

The University Libraries has access to many dissertations in electronic form. The Dissertations @ SUNY Albany database provides access to dissertations written by former UAlbany students. This database provides full-text access to dissertations written from 1997 to present and abstracts of dissertations from 1988 to present. (Note: Check the MINERVA catalog for print and/or microform copies of UAlbany dissertations from all years.)

The other resource is Dissertations & Theses. Unlike Dissertations @ SUNY Albany, which only contains dissertations written by former members of UAlbany, Dissertations & Theses contains dissertations written by students from schools across the country. Complete full text access is not avaialable for non UAlbany dissertations, but many records include the first 25 pages, and there is abstracting from 1980 to present. (Note: Check the MINERVA catalog to see if we own dissertations. If not, submit a request to Interlibrary Loan.)

Depending on your area of study, the University Libraries provide access to databases that allow you to search for dissertations in order to see what have been written on a particular topic. The following is a list of subject areas and the databases that index dissertations on those areas:

Criminal Justice:
• Criminal Justice Abstracts
• National Criminal Justice Reference Service Abstracts Database
• Sociological Abstracts)

Information Studies:
• Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts with Full Text
• ERIC
• INSPEC

Social Welfare:
• Social Work Abstracts
• Social Services Abstracts
• Sociological Abstracts

Political Science, Public Administration & Policy, and Law:
• CSA Worldwide Political Science Abstracts

Another resource available to students writing their dissertations is the subject specialist for each area of research. Throughout the University Libraries, there are Librarians that specialize in all the major subject areas and are available by appointment to help you devise a search strategy. The names, locations, and contact information for each subject specialist can be found on the Subject Specialist page within the University Libraries website.

There are numerous style guides and advice books that provide valuable insight and counsel on the entire dissertation-writing experience. The following are just a small sample of the many style guides and advice books available through the University Libraries:

Calabrese, Raymond L. Elements of an effective dissertation and thesis a step-by-step guide to getting it right the first time. Lanham, Md: Rowman & Littlefield, 2006.
University Library / Reference LB 2369 C275 2006

Lyons, Peter. The dissertation from beginning to end. New York: Oxford University Press, 2010
University Library / HV 11 L963 2010

Mauch, James E. Guide to the successful thesis and dissertation a handbook for students and faculty. New York: M. Dekker, 2003.
Dewey Library / Reference LB 2369 M377 2003

Miller, Alison B. Finish your dissertation once and for all! how to overcome psychological barriers, get results, and move on with your life. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association, 2009.
University Library / LB 2369 M454 2009

For information about submitting dissertations, please visit the Graduate Studies Office for Dissertation Submittal Policies and Guidelines.

Blog post created by Matthew Laudicina

March 3, 2010

Not on Campus? Not a Problem! Off Campus Access to Library Resources

No longer is it a requirement for patrons to physically enter the library in order to access our many online databases and resources. Here in the 21st century, the library is all about coming to you! Available to current students, faculty or staff members, all it takes is your Net ID and UNIX cluster password, and in no time you’ll be power searching through our online databases from the comfort of, well, anywhere!

Before you attempt to remotely access any of the library databases, be sure to have your Net ID and password at the ready. Next, go to Databases and Indexes and locate the database you wish to search. When you click on the desired database, instead of immediately entering the database, you will be prompted to enter your Net ID and password. Enter your information, and search to your heart’s content! For a more detailed explanation of how to remotely access library databases, please visit Off-Campus Access Instructions for Databases and Online Journals.

In addition to our databases, there are many other ways to receive research help and assistance from off campus. First there is the Ask-A-Librarian service, where you can have a Reference Librarian provide you with research assistance via email. You can also have your questions answered through our Instant Messaging service.

If you ever find yourself in dire informational straits and without access to a computer, you can utilize the text a librarian service. To send us a text message, on your cell phone dial 265010, start the text with “ualibraries:� then write your message (don't forget to include the colon). Keep in mind that a single text message cannot exceed 160 characters, so brevity is key when texting us your questions.

For research help targeted at a particular subject area, take advantage of the Research by Subject pages within the University Libraries’ website. Each research guide provides information regarding the best databases to use for your topic and quality internet resources, as well as area-specific resources and information, to help you get your research going in the right direction.
Also available through the University Libraries’ website is the Online Reference Collection. Statistical sources, style guides, maps & directions, Government Information, Consumer Information, and Career Resources are just a few of the many topics covered within the Online Reference Collection.

Don’t forget that the University Libraries’ Minerva catalog iis available to you from any computer with an internet connection. Search for books from the comfort of your living room, then go to the proper library and check them out.

If you are mainly in the downtown campus and need a book from one of the uptown libraries, or vice versa, be sure to take advantage of our UA Delivery service. Log in to ILLiad using your Net ID and password, and then enter the citation information of the book. Before you know it, the book will be delivered to your designated pick up library and ready for you to check out. UA Delivery can also be used to have journal articles scanned and electronically delivered to your email inbox.

Sometimes you find yourself in need of a particular book or journal article that the University Libraries do not own. In these situations, Interlibrary Loan can be a life saver! The process of filling out an Interlibrary Loan request is nearly identical to that of a UA Delivery request, with the only difference being that you click on the “NO – continue to Interlibrary Loan� link as opposed to the “YES – Continue to UA Delivery services� link.

Another valuable resource that can be accessed remotely is a series of E-book Collections offered by the University Libraries. These resources contain a wealth of E-books on a wide range of topics that can be viewed in their entirety. You can also limit your search in the library catalog, Minerva, to Online Resources - select this option in the pull down menu next to the words "search only."

There you have it! If you have any questions or need assistance with remote access to the library databases or any other library resource, please refer to NetID’s in the University Libraries or Troubleshooting FAQ for Off-Campus Access for more information.

Blog post created by Matthew Laudicina

February 24, 2010

Services for Disabled Patrons in Dewey Library

The University Libraries offer special services for patrons who are either permanently or temporarily disabled. Students need to first register with the Disability Resource Center , located in Campus Center 137. Then students, faculty, or staff members who need help in the libraries can either register with the library online (), or contact Kabel Nathan Stanwicks (email kstanwicks@uamail.albany.edu or call 442-3578).

For help with services at Dewey Library, please contact our Assistant for Dewey Library Operations, Lindsay Van Berkom (email lvanberkom@uamail.albany.edu or call 442-3696). You can also speak with a reference librarian for help with the workstation reserved for patrons with disabilities. This workstation is equipped with a scanner, microphone, and headphones, as well as the Jaws 7.10 screen reader software, and the Kurzweil 1000 software, which makes printed and electronic text available for the visually impaired. In addition, the workstation also features the Dragon Naturally Speaking 9.0 speech recognition software.

General access to Dewey Library is through the first floor of Draper Hall. To access the classroom and group study areas on the mezzanine level, you must first alert library staff to unlock the entrance door. Then you can enter through the basement of Draper Hall.

Photocopying and campus book delivery service are provided by the UA Delivery service. If further assistance is needed, please ask library staff or call 442-3696. For more information, check out our page about Library Services for Persons with Disabilities at all libraries on campus.

Blog post created by Matthew Laudicina

February 10, 2010

Need to Manage Your Library Account? Use My Minerva!

It is now easier than ever for library users to manage their library account. The next time you find yourself needing to renew a book you have already checked out, request a book that is on loan to be recalled, or any other library activity, try logging in to My Minerva. Located within the library’s online catalog, My Minerva is your one stop shop for everything pertaining to your library account.

To access My Minerva, start by clicking on Minerva – Library Catalog, located on the University Libraries homepage under Quick Links. In the top right corner of the Minerva Catalog is the sign-in for My Minerva. Enter your Net ID and Password and click Log On.

Once you have logged in to My Minerva, you will see the current status of your account. At a glance, you will be able to see the number of items that are currently checked out, how many books have been recently returned to the library, if you have placed a recall on any library materials, and the balance on your account. If you want to see more detailed information on any of these activities, simply click on the corresponding number. To renew a book that is already checked out, for example, you would click on the number next to the Loans category to see the list of books that are currently checked out. From there, click on the particular book you would like to renew, then on the next screen click Renew.

That’s all there is to it! If you have any questions or need help logging in to your My Minerva account, you can stop by the Reference Desk, give us a call at 442-3691, email us through the Ask-A-Librarian service, or visit NetID's in the University Libraries for more information.

Blog post created by Matthew Laudicina

February 3, 2010

Wi-Fi and Lending Laptops in the Library

Did you know that in addition to the network connected computers in the Information Commons, the library also offers a wireless connection to the Internet? Here at Dewey Library, all UAlbany students, faculty, and staff can access the wireless network with their laptops or any wifi enabled device, such as a smartphone. The signal for the wireless network can be found on the entire first floor of the library, as well as the lower level except for the Mezzanine and compact storage areas. You will need your NetID, your UNIX cluster password), and a laptop with an 802.11 b/g wireless card that supports WPA in order to connect to the wireless network (most newer laptops come with this card already installed).. For complete instructions on how to connect your laptop to the wireless network, please refer to the Wireless Internet Access Instructions for additional information.

While a large majority of laptops have a wireless network interface card built into the laptop itself, there are older laptops that do not include this card. If you happen to own a laptop that does not feature a wireless network interface card, you can borrow one from the Circulation desk. In order for the card to function once it is connected to your laptop, you will need to download and install drivers. Instructions on Wireless Network Interface Card Driver Installation () are available online. Once you are connected to the wireless network, wireless printing from your laptop is available through the ITS Uniprint System.

If you would like to take advantage of the wireless network, but do not own a laptop, you can borrow one from the library through the University Libraries Laptop Lending Service. There are two laptops available at Dewey Library for students, faculty, and staff to borrow. Laptops can be checked out for up to four hours, or until thirty minutes before the library closes. The laptops are outfitted with Windows XP Pro operating system, a CD/DVD read/write drive, power cord, battery, mouse, an internal wireless card, and a USB port for use with a flash/portable/thumb drive. Some of the software that is available on the lending laptops includes Microsoft Office 2007, Internet Explorer 8 and Mozilla Firefox browsers, Adobe’s Acrobat Reader and Flash Player, Windows Media Player, and CD Burner XP Pro. These laptops cannot leave the library premises. Files that are created on the lending laptop must be saved to a removable external drive.

If you have any questions about connecting to the wireless network, borrowing one of the wireless network interface cards, or you can call the ITS HelpDesk WiUAlbany at 442-3700. Circulation staff will allow you to use their phone at the Circulation desk for this purpose, and will also help you with the laptops available for checkout at the library. You can also submit a Help Request at the ITS and FAQ Feedback Form.

Blog post created by Matthew Laudicina

January 20, 2010

Get Help Early and Get Off to a Good Start This Semester

There are many library services that can save you time and make life a lot easier for you. Get off to a good start this semester by making use of these and other services:

• When you’re off campus, use Ask-a-Librarian -- email, IM, or telephone us for assistance with using databases, formatting a citation, choosing a research topic or any other questions.

• Request items this library does not own by using Interlibrary Loan – simply fill out the ILLiad form with the item information and then we will search libraries all over the world to obtain it.

• Take one of the Dewey Workshops! This can provide you an overview of the services and resources that will help you get started. You shouldn’t have to learn how to use the library while you are doing research. Learn the library ahead of time and when it’s time to write that paper, you can quickly get started on finding what you need.

• Make an appointment with a bibliographer. Subject specialist librarians are available by appointment, email and telephone to help with your discipline-specific questions. Bibliographers have in-depth knowledge of the resources related to your field. They can help refine paper topics, choose keywords for the most effective database searches, and work with you to find the articles and books you need for your paper.

Take the time to look at the services section of our website today – there may be other things with which we can help!

December 16, 2009

Alumni Can now Access New Library Databases

Now available to all members of the University at Albany Alumni Association are two new research databases. These new databases, which are provided by the Office of Library and Information Services, can be accessed remotely by anyone who is a member of the Alumni Association.

One of the new databases is Academic Search – Alumni Edition. This multidisciplinary database is intended to provide for the research needs of post-college professionals. Included in the database is full text access to over 3,000 journals, as well as indexing and abstracting for over 8,000 journals.

The other database now available to active members of the Alumni Association is Business Source – Alumni Edition. The key difference between this database and Academic Search is that while Academic Search is multidisciplinary, Business Search provides coverage in all areas of business. Designed specifically with the needs of the post-college business professional in mind, this database provides full text access to over 1,400 business magazines and journals.

It is important to note that in order to gain access to these databases, you must not only be an alumni of the University at Albany, but also a member of the Alumni Association. Please visit the University at Albany Alumni Online Community website for information on how to register for free with the Alumni Association and access the Alumni databases. For a complete list of databases and resources available to all alumni of the University at Albany, please visit the Alumni Services – Database List. Alumni still have the ability to borrow materials from the library and other services.

Blog post created by Matthew Laudicina

December 9, 2009

Feeling Pressured by the End of the Semester? Ease the Squeeze with these Helpful Study Tips!

We’ve all been there at one point or another in our lives: so close to the end of the semester that you can taste it, yet a seeming Mt. Everest sized mountain of work standing in the way of winter freedom. While scaling the actual Mt. Everest is, in all likelihood, an impossibility, you CAN make it through your heaping pile of year-end assignments, with a little elbow grease and the aid of this very blog entry!

Let’s start with some helpful websites. First we have How To Study and Make the Most of Your Time. This site provides comprehensive information and tips on how to improve the effectiveness of your studying habits and techniques.

Next we have a site maintained by Dartmouth College Academic Skills Center titled Where to Study / How To Study. As the title would suggest, this site offers tips on effective study locations, strategies on how to study more effectively, and methods to improve your concentration and memory.

Another site with helpful study tips, created by the College of Saint Benedict / Saint John’s University in Minnesota, is called Remembering What You Read. As the name would suggest, this site offers helpful tips on how to not only read more efficiently, but also how to retain more information when you read. Some of the strategies that this site goes into detail include creating associations while you read, visualization of key information in your mind, and effective repetition strategies.

If you find yourself studying somewhere other than one of the University Libraries, there are a multitude of ways in which to contact a reference librarian for help. For those in need of instantaneous communication, there is Instant Messaging Reference. Point your browser to the UALibraries Instant Messaging page and receive reference assistance wherever you are studying.

Similarly, you can also receive reference assistance via text message. To text a librarian your question(s), on your cell phone, dial 265010. Start the text with: ualibraries: (include the colon), then write your question. University Libraries will accept SMS (text messages) during the hours that IM Reference is available. Be aware that a single text message cannot exceed 160 characters. Before you text your questions to UALibraries, take a moment to review our Texting Policy for more information.

Don’t forget about our Ask-A-Librarian Email Reference Service! To send us your questions via email, first go to the Ask-A-Librarian online form. While a response might not come as quickly as the IM or Text services, a librarian will respond to your email usually within 24 hours, often times within an hour or two.

If you would like one-on-one assistance with your assignments, schedule an appointment with a bibliographer. Library bibliographers specialize in one or more subject areas, and are available to meet with you and offer their expertise. To know which bibliographers specialize in your area of need, go to the Subject Specialists page, which lists each bibliographer and their areas of expertise, along with their contact information. The bibliographers are more than happy to meet with you and help, so don’t be shy!

Library databases are available to all UAlbany students, both on campus and remotely. If you happen to be off campus and need to use the Library databases, the process of accessing them remotely is very easy. Simply go to the Databases & Indexes page and select a database as you normally would. When you click on the database you wish to search, instead of going right into the database, as is the case when you are on-campus, you will first be prompted for your UAlbany NetID and password. Enter your information and you’ll be good to go.

Last but not least, you can always drop by the Dewey Library Reference desk and the librarian on duty will be happy to help you with any questions you may have about the research process. We want you to succeed, and we're here to help!

Blog post created by Matthew Laudicina

December 2, 2009

Getting the documents you need through Interlibrary Loan and Document Delivery

Two great services offered by the University Libraries to all university students, faculty, and staff are Interlibrary Loan and UA Delivery. On the surface, both services sound very similar to one another; each provides delivery services for books, articles, and audio/visual materials. However, the key difference between the two services is that UA Delivery is used for the delivery of materials owned by the University Libraries, and Interlibrary Loan delivers materials that are not owned by University Libraries. Not sure if University Libraries own an item? Check the Minerva Library Catalog to find out.

Before you submit any request to either Interlibrary Loan or UA Delivery, be sure to check the Minerva Library Catalog. If the item you are interested in borrowing is found in Minerva, then you know you need to use the UA Delivery Service. If the item cannot be found in Minerva, then you will need to use the Interlibrary Loan Service.

Since both services use the same ILLiad system to process requests, you will first need to create an ILLiad account before you can use either service. From the University Libraries homepage, click on Interlibrary Loan / UA Delivery. Then click on the Connect to ILLiad link. If you have already created an ILLiad account, you can login from this page. If you have yet to create an ILLiad account, you will need to create one by clicking on the link for First Time Users.

When requesting a book through the UA Delivery Service, the book will be sent to the pick-up location you select when you create your ILLiad account; the University Library, Science Library, or Dewey Library. You should also be aware that unless you are a faculty member, books requested through the UA Delivery Service are only delivered from the Uptown Campus to the Downtown Campus or vice versa. In other words, if your pickup location is the Dewey Library, you can request a book from the University Library or the Science Library, but not a book that is already located in the Dewey Library.

Journal articles from any library can be scanned and emailed to you through UA Delivery, provided the Libraries only have the article in print format. To make sure an article is not available online, once again, check Minerva to see if we subscribe to the journal. Any online access to the journal will be indexed in Minerva.

Any journal article requested through either UA Delivery or Interlibrary Loan will be delivered electronically to your ILLiad account. While there is not a limit to the number of Interlibrary Loan requests you can make, UA Delivery requests are limited to three per day.

If you have questions about ILL, you can contact the Interlibrary Loan office at 518-442-3613 or email them at libill@albany.edu. For questions about Document Delivery, contact the Dewey Library at 442-3691, or email us at dewref@albany.edu.

Blog post created by Matthew Laudiciina

November 25, 2009

Having trouble finding the right articles? Try using the Database Thesaurus

Electronic resources, such as online databases have forever changed the way we conduct scholarly research. It is now easier than ever to search through thousands of journal articles in the blink of an eye and retrieve quality articles that are relevant to your search terms. However, simply using everyday words or phrases as your search terms, or Natural Language search terms, might not always be the best way to go about searching within a database. Luckily, many databases provide users with a customized thesaurus that can connect users with the terminology used within the database, resulting in much more accurate and relevant search results.

The Ohio State University Libraries provide a good explanation of database thesauri:
A thesaurus is a list of predetermined words and phrases that describe the subject matter of a database. A synonym for "thesaurus" is "controlled vocabulary" because the database creators "control" the vocabulary assigned to the database's subject headings. A real-world example of a thesaurus is the list of subject headings used in the telephone Yellow Pages. That is, whether you want to find a lawyer or an attorney (or an ambulance-chaser) in the Yellow Pages you must look under "Attorneys." This actually helps you out--provided you know what term to use--because you only have to look under one heading in order to find yourself a good lawyer.

An information database often has an accompanying thesaurus. An online database like ERIC and PsycINFO may have an online thesaurus incorporated into it. Other databases, whether online or print, may have printed thesauri that you can use in tandem with the databases.

One popular database we can use to highlight its thesaurus is PsycInfo. From the initial basic search screen that appears when you first open PsycInfo, click on the “Search Tools� link within the green search area. Underneath the search box, change the selection from “Map Term� to “Thesaurus� and enter your desired terms. For example, a search of “Substance Abuse� will produce the term “Drug Abuse� within the thesaurus. From there, the thesaurus provides broader, related, and narrower terms that pertain to drug abuse and can help refine your search. While “substance abuse� might have produced some results within PsycInfo, “drug abuse� is the official term used in the database thesaurus, and will return articles that are better suited to your topic.

Other databases with easily accessible thesauri include EBSCO’s ERIC and Medline databases. For both databases, the link to the thesauri is located at the very top of the search screen. In Medline the link to the thesaurus is called MeSH, while in ERIC it is simply called Thesaurus. While they may be named differently, they function nearly identically. After clicking on the link, you are given a search box to input your natural language terms, which the database will then attempt to retrieve the corresponding term within its thesaurus. From there you can use the controlled vocabulary provided by the thesaurus to find articles under the same heading.

In addition to being readily available through the database, the thesauri for both PsychInfo and ERIC can be found in print in the Reference section of the library. Their call numbers are as follows:

Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms
Dewey Library / Reference Z 695.1 P7 T48

Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors
Dewey Library / Reference Z 695.1 E3 E34

Other less frequently used databases also have thesauri. If you are not sure if the database you are using has th is feature or have any questions regarding the use of database thesauri, bring your questions to the Reference Desk, email us at dewref@albany.edu or give us a call at 442-3691.

Blog post created by Matthew Laudicina

November 11, 2009

Need a Place to Store Your Files? Use Your S Drive!

Flash Drives have emerged as the go-to technology for storing and transporting information from place to place. With their large storage capacities, pocket-friendly form factor, and miniscule price tag, flash drives are here to stay. But what do you do when you forget to bring your flash drive with you? There’s no need to fear, the S: Drive is here!

Each and every UAlbany student has access to their own space on the UNIX system, called the S: Drive. Students can drag and save files to their S: Drive so that they are readily available each time the S: Drive is accessed. At 100mb, the storage capacity of the S: Drive is likely smaller than that of your flash drive, but unlike your flash drive, the S: Drive is always here for you, so long as you are logged into the system with your NetID and password..

Students can access their S: Drive through the library computers located in the Information Commons area of the Dewey Library. The drive can be easily located by clicking on the Start Button of any Information Commons PC. Also, any time you click on "My Computer, from a campus computer, the S: drive will be there.

More information regarding the S: Drive can be found at the Using Your S: Drive At-A-Glance page from the ITS website.

Blog post created by Matthew Laudicina

November 4, 2009

Get One-on-One With a Librarian!

Now that your papers, assignments, and large research projects are coming due, you might need to spend more time using library resources and services. Sometimes knowing even where to start can be overwhelming, and sometimes you've had luck in the past but this time your searching seems to be fruitless.

Have no fear! Librarians are happy to help with your research project, we can help find the most relevant search terms in a given database and teach you advanced searching strategies, as well as help you set up database "alerts" to keep apprised of new publicatons on your topic of interest. We will be glad to set up a time to meet with you on a one-to-one basis for extended assistance with that important project.

Contact a subject bibliographer today to set up an appointment:

Criminal Justice: Mary Jane Brustman: email: mbrustman@uamail.albany.edu, phone: 442-3540
Information Studies: Deborah Bernnard: email: dbernnard@uamail.albany.edu, phone: 442-3699
Public Administration and Policy: Dick Irving: email: diriving@uamail.albany.edu, phone: 442-3698
Social Welfare/Gerontology: Elaine Bergman email: ebergman@uamail.albany.edu, phone: 442-3695

Blog post created by Matthew Laudicina

October 28, 2009

Using the Library When You're Not at the Library

Back in the day, there were very few library resources and services you could access without actually coming to the library. Sure, you could call the reference desk, or bring a book home once you checked it out, but for the most part, you had to be at the library to make use of it.

Times have changed -- every year there are more ways you can access library resources and services without actually entering the building. You can now do research, renew books, and perform many other library related tasks from wherever you are, whenever you feel like it!

Here are just a few of the ways you can use the library when you're not actually at the library:


  • Get articles and more online. Each year, more and more of the library's resources become available online -- not just databases, but journal articles, books, images, music and more! So long as you access the resource through the library website and log in with your NetID and password, you will have access to almost all of our online resources.

  • Renew books, check on fines, holds and recalls. Using your "My Minerva" account, you can renew books or check the status of your library account from anywhere, at any time. Simply go to Minerva, the library catalog, and log in to your My Minerva acount in the upper right hand corner. Once logged in you will be able to see all books you have checked out, their due dates and other information. With one click, renew all of your books!

  • Request print books and articles. If you are based at the downtown campus, our UA Delivery service allows you to request that books from the uptown campus be delivered to the Dewey Library, saving you a trip. Even better than that, if we have a journal article that is only in print, you don't need to come to the library to photocopy it. Make a UA Delivery request for the article and we will scan the article and email it to you in PDF form. If you make these requests late at night, they will be filled the next day!

  • Ask A Librarian! Sure, we love it when you come to the reference desk to ask us a question, but if you can't get to the library, there are many ways to contact a librarian for assistance: phone, e-mail, instant message, and text message. If it's the middle of the night, send us an e-mail and we'll answer it the next morning!

With all these great ways to access the library from home, we hope you'll still drop by sometimes just to say hello!

October 14, 2009

Midterm Madness? The Library is Here to Help!

Did you know that tomorrow marks the midterm point in the semester? Time moves quickly when those research papers, projects and other assignments are nearing their due dates. But don't let midterm madness get you down. The library offers services to help you locate the information and resources you need to get an A+ on that important assignment. We can help orient you so that when it is time for you to do research, you don't have to waste precious time trying to figure out how to navigate the online databases, library catalog, and other print and online resources. To familiarize yourself with using the library we suggest doing one or more of the following:


  1. Take a workshop. We offer several workshops to help you learn how to do graduate level library research and teach you about print and online resources with which you may not be familiar. Workshops such as Introduction to Research Databases, Conducting Research Online, and Using EndNote would be helpful for students of any academic discipline to get a basic "lay of the land" in using library resources, and will only take about an hour of your time. The schedule of classes is available in print at the reference desk as well as online. To register, drop by the reference desk, call 442-3691, or use the online registration form.

  2. Make an appointment. Bibliographers are librarians who are specialists in a specific academic subject. Dewey Library has a biblographer for each of the schools at the downtown campus -- Criminal Justice, Information Studies, Public Administration and Policy, and Social Welfare. Contact your subject bibliographer when you need one-on-one assistance with in depth research, or you have questions about resources specific to your academic discipline. Make an appointment with your bibliographer today!

  3. Ask a librarian! Sometimes, what you need is an answer to what seems like a fairly straightforward question. It may be how to choose the right keywords for a database search, how to locate statistics on an important topic, or finding an overview of the research in a given specialty. Your question might not merit an appointment with a bibliographer, but you need someone to help point you in the right direction. Reference librarians are available to help you with these kinds of questions. You can always stop by the reference desk, but we are also available by phone ( 442-3691), http://library.albany.edu/help/email/">e-mail, as well as IM and text messaging. Sometimes, asking a quick question at the reference desk will save you hours of time trying to figure something out on your own. We're glad to help!

October 7, 2009

ITS Assistants are Here to Help

Everyone knows that the Reference Desk is the place to go for research help and assistance, but where does one turn for answers to those burning tech questions? Enter the ITS Student Assistant!

An ITS Student Assistant, provided by the Consultants who work for Information Technology Services () and are not library staff, can be found in the Information Commons area of the Dewey Library. They are here to help patrons with any and all technology-related questions and issues.

While classes are in session, their hours are:
Monday-Thursday 2pm-8pm
Friday 2pm-5pm
Sunday 2pm-6pm

For tech help when the ITS Student Assistant is not available, you can ask the Reference Desk for assistance with basic computer troubles such as printing or formatting a document in Microsoft Word. If the problem requires greater expertise, we will call the ITS HelpDesk office hours, at 442-3700 x2 or submit a request to the ITS Service Desk.

The library strives to make sure you are able to get the help you need with university resources, be it our technology, our databases, our books -- just ask!

Blog post created by Matthew Laudicina

September 30, 2009

Ph.D. Due Date is Today

Today is the fall fixed due date for Ph.D. candidates to return or renew their books. Avoid library overdue fines by renewing your books on MyMinerva or by bringing them back to the library today. If you have questions, please call the Dewey circulation desk at 442-3693. The Dewey Library appreciates your cooperation.

September 28, 2009

Ph.D. Due Date is Wednesday

A reminder to all Ph.D. candidates that the summer fixed date for returning or renewing books is this coming Wednesday, September 30, 2009. Ph.D. students are able to renew books a maximum of 8 times, and this can be done through your MyMinerva account. This fixed due date applies to Ph.D. candidates only. If you are a Master's level student or other type of borrower, please view our circulation loan policy for applicable lending periods.

If you have any questions about loan periods, overdue fines, or renewing books, please contact our Circulation Desk at 442-3693.

September 23, 2009

Updated APA Manual Available

The newest edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association is now available at the Dewey Graduate Library. According to the APA website, some of the revisions made to the APA Manual include:
•New guidelines for referencing electronic sources.
•New and expanded reference examples for a variety of on-line sources.
•Organized to describe the writing process from idea to publication, it begins with background information on ethical issues in publishing, then moves on to manuscript structure and content, then writing style and rules, then graphics and references, then guidance on working with the publisher.
•Sample paper section has been moved up and featured to better exemplify manuscript structure and content.
•Like discussions have been moved to one place in the book, with discussions of function followed by instruction on form.

The new APA Manual can be found in both the reference section and on reserve at call number: BF 76.7 P83 2010. You may also be interested in the APA's online tour of the new guide.

In addition to the print APA Manual, the University at Albany Libraries offers a quick explanation of the basic APA formats on its Style Guides page.

And don’t forget about the Reference Desk! We encourage you to bring any questions you may have to the Reference Desk -- email us, drop by, or call us at 442-3691.

Post created by Matthew Laudicina

September 9, 2009

Inter-university consortium for Political and Social Science Research – ICPSR

The University Libraries provide a membership to ICPSR through the libraries web site. Look on the Databases and Indexes page for “ICPSR� and click on the link there to find the ICPSR web page.

Creating a MyData account will permit you to access new features in the future such as order history and notification when data that interests you become available. Further, if you are from a member institution, creating an account permits you to download data available only to ICPSR members.

ICPSR is the world's largest archive of computerized social science data. It is searchable by broad subject category or keyword. Most files are freely available to download by users affiliated with the University at Albany. An international consortium of about 700 academic institutions and research organizations, ICPSR provides leadership and training in data access, curation, and methods of analysis for the social science research community. ICPSR maintains a data archive of more than 500,000 files of research in the social sciences. It hosts 16 specialized collections of data in education, aging, criminal justice, substance abuse, terrorism, and other fields.

ICPSR's educational activities include the Summer Program in Quantitative Methods of Social Research , a comprehensive curriculum of intensive courses in research design, statistics, data analysis, and social methodology. Since 1963, the ICPSR Summer Program has offered a comprehensive curriculum in the field of social science methodology. Courses range from beginning to advanced levels in statistics, data analysis, methodology, and research design. ICPSR also leads several initiatives that encourage use of data in teaching, particularly for undergraduate instruction.

Blog post created by Lorre Smith
Lorre Smith is the ICPSR Official Representative for the University at Albany. If you have questions about ICPSR and if you wish to arrange a presentation about ICPSR for a group or class, contact Lorre at (518) 437-3946; lsmith@uamail.albany.edu

September 2, 2009

Printing at the Dewey Library

This time of year, many students have questions about printing in at the Dewey Library. We have two black and white printers at Dewey, one on the main floor at the end of the computer area, and one in the basement area. In addition there is a color printer behind the slide show screen.

In order to print, you must have a SUNYCard or a Podium card with money on it. Black and white printing is ten cents per page and color printing is fifty cents per page. From the Information Commons computers or your wireless laptop, select print as you normally would. Then select either “DeweyLibBW� for black and white or “DeweyLibColor� for color printing. Walk over to one of the printers and slide your card at the terminal. The monitor will display all jobs in the print queue. Select your job, and click print. Remember to log out of the Uniprinter right away so that others cannot use your account to pay for their print jobs. Your document should come out of the printer, provided there was enough money on your card to pay for the job.

You can put money on your SUNYCard several ways. First, you can phone or visit the SUNYCard office (442-5989, Campus Center B52), you can pay by credit card online through PodiumNet , or you can use our SUNYCard terminal. If you did not bring your SUNYCard, you can buy a Podium card at the machine, but remember this card costs one dollar, and then you have to add money to it on top of that. So remember to carry your SUNYCard at all times!

If you have problems printing, check with the ITS consultant on duty. He or she is sitting next to the printer in the Information Commons area on the main floor, and will have a sign on his or her terminal. When there is no ITS consultant on duty, check at the reference desk or circulation desk for assistance.

August 11, 2009

Finding New books

Not only can you browse the new books shelf at the Dewey Library, but you can browse these titles online through Minerva as well. A new feature, called “New Titles� lets you browse new items by subject, exploring all three of the University Libraries. New titles are not only books but new journals and other media added to our collection as well.

When you first open up Minerva, you will see several tabs running the top of the page. The New Titles tab is all the to to the far right. Click on it and you will be brought to a new window displaying subjects according to call number.
For example, if you are looking for new titles in Law, you will ckick on “K – Law� since most law titles are under a call number beginning with the letter K. Once you click, the page will anchor towards the Law section on the page, displaying all the new titles recently added in the past month. You will see that 8 new titles have been added to the collection.

All new titles are hyperlinks that when clicked brings you to the online record for the item. This is helpful because the record tells you what library you can find the item in.

Need more help finding new books? Don’t be afraid to Ask a Librarian for help!

Blog post created by Jill Parsons

June 3, 2009

OVID 101: Navigating PsycInfo and other Ovid databases

If you have recently used certain databases, such as PsycINFO or Social Work Abstracts to search for journal articles, you might notice the screens looking a little different than what you were used to. What used to be known as the Silver Platter interface has changed to the Ovid interface. If you’re having difficulty navigating the pages and changes, the following should help you. We'll use PsycInfo as an example.

When you first open PsycINFO, you will see a basic search screen appears:

Continue reading "OVID 101: Navigating PsycInfo and other Ovid databases" »

May 31, 2009

Ph.D. Due Date is Today

Today is the summer fixed due date for Ph.D. candidates. If you are a Ph.D.candidate and have material due on this day, you must return or renew it. Please call the Circulation Desk at 442-3693 for more information.

May 28, 2009

Ph.D. Due date is Sunday

A reminder to all Ph.D. candidates that the summer fixed date for returning or renewing books is this coming Sunday, May 31, 2009. Ph.D. students are able to renew books a maximum of 8 times, and this can be done through your MyMinerva account. This fixed due date applies to Ph.D. candidates only. If you are a master's level student or other type of borrower, please view our circulation loan policy for applicable lending periods.

If you have any questions about loan periods, overdue fines, or renewing books, please contact our Circulation Desk at 442-3693.

May 19, 2009

Spend Some Time with a Librarian

Yes, the semester is over, but you may have summer projects, grant activities, or other research that needs to be completed. Dewey Librarians are still available to help you, both at the reference desk and by appointment.

Librarians are happy to help with your research project, we can help find the most relevant search terms in a given database and teach you advanced searching strategies, as well as help you set up database "alerts" to keep apprised of new publicatons on your topic of interest.

Contact a subject bibliographer today to set up an appointment:

Criminal Justice: Mary Jane Brustman: email: mbrustman@uamail.albany.edu, phone: 442-3540
Information Studies: Deborah Bernnard: email: dbernnard@uamail.albany.edu, phone: 442-3699
Public Administration and Policy: Dick Irving: email: diriving@uamail.albany.edu, phone: 442-3698
Social Welfare/Gerontology: Elaine Bergman email: ebergman@uamail.albany.edu, phone: 442-3695

May 6, 2009

Summer Means Research... Research Means Grantseeking

The spring semester is coming to a close and some of you might be turning your focus to funding your research through grants over the summer. Dewey Library has many resources to help you find the right organization to submit your proposals to. Plus, our librarians are more than willing to help you with finding grants.

For starters, here are some print resources in the Dewey reference collection:


  • Annual Register of Grant Support: This book will give you a list of grant funders for all disciplines and specialties. REF AS 911 A2 A67

  • The Foundation Directory: Similar to the one above, this resource lists grant funding organizations by state. REF AS 911 A2 F65

  • Government Assistance Almanac: A yearly listing of federally-funded grants. REF HC110 .P63 G69

  • The International Foundation Directory: As the name suggests, grants that are funded through international organizations. REF HV 7 I57

  • Directory of Research Grants: Runs the gamut of U.S., federal and international grants available for research purposes. REF LB2338 D57X 2008 v. 1 and v. 2

  • The Grants Register: Considered “The Complete Guide to Postgraduate Funding Worldwide.â€? REF LB2338 G7

  • Government Research Directory: Comparable to the Government Assistance Almanac REF Q179.98 G68

Dewey has many print resources to help you apply for grants. Here’s just a sample to check out:


  • The “How Toâ€? Grants Manual: REF HG177 B38 1999

  • Proposal Planning and Writing: REF HG177.5 U6 M56

Also, check out the libraries Financial Aids and Grants page for more opportunities and information.

In addition to grant resources found at the library, the University provides a page on graduate student funding opportunities and proposal resources. Here you’ll find links to resources such as the National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowship Program and the Lupus Foundation of America, Inc. There are also guides to proposal writing.

Be sure to check out the Accent on Research, a quarterly newsletter which contains graduate funding opportunities as well. Find out about faculty research opportunities as well as postdoctoral fellowships.

Let us know if you need help using these resources!

Blog post created by Jill Parsons

April 29, 2009

Five Ways to Ask a Librarian for Help.

Are you aware of all the different ways to go about asking a librarian for assistance? Whether you have a simple question about Document Delivery or need in-depth research consultation, here are five ways to ask us for help no matter where you are:

1. In Person: A tried and true way, you can still walk up to the reference desk in the library and ask us face-to-face for assistance. Our reference hours at Dewey are Monday – Thursday 10am – 8pm, Friday 1pm-5pm, Saturday Noon- 5pm and Sunday 1pm-7pm. Stop on by (and no, you’re not bothering us)!

2. Phone: Not at the Dewey library? Pick up your phone and give us a call at 442-3691 during the above reference hours, or while you’re at it…

3. …Text us your question at 265010! Please start your text with “ualibraries:" (don't forget to include the colon) and then write your question. This service is available Monday – Thursday 10:00am - 9:00pm, Friday
10:00am - 4:00pm, Saturday, 1:00pm - 5:00pm and Sunday 1:00pm - 9:00pm.

4. Emaill: Use the very popular “Ask a Librarian� service to email us 24 hours a day. We promise to get back to you as soon as possible, no more than 24 hours after your question during normal operating hours.

5.Instant Message: During “texting� hours, send us an instant message from your home computer and get an instant answer.

With all these different ways to ask librarians for help, there’s no reason you shouldn’t! We’re here to help you with anything you need so you can do your best. We look forward to hearing from you!

April 28, 2009

Faculty Due Date is Thursday

Just a reminder: all materials currently on loan to faculty are due back Thursday, April 30. You may renew your materials either in person or online.

Ph.D candidates have a fixed due date of May 31. Loans to Masters' students are for 90 days from checkout.

We appreciate your efforts to return or renew books in a timely manner. Questions about the library's lending policy? Check out our Circulation Services page, or call us at 442-3693.

April 22, 2009

More Ways to Get the Books You Need

Finding a book in the library can be as simple as going to the shelf and retrieving the book. Sometimes, the book you need is not on the shelf. If this happens, fill out any of our request forms to get the item you need.

Here are the main request forms available to students:

Recall Services : This form should be filled out when the item you need is checked out to another patron and you urgently need the item for your research. You can recall an item through your Minerva account, meaning the patron who has the book checked out will have to return it 14 days of your recall. Users are limited to ten active recall requests. Please be aware that any item you have checked out may be recalled by another student as well. This form is also available directly from Minerva, when you are on the "location" screen of the item record, there is a "recall this book" link -- all you have to do is login with your NetId and password, and the book is automatically recalled.

On Order/In Processing Request Form /strong>: If you look up a book in Minerva and the status says either states “On Order," "In Processing," "In Cataloging Backlog," or "Under Consideration," fill out the form to request that the processing be rushed and the book placed on hold for you. In other words, we will speed up making this book avaialable and you will be contacted when it is ready.

<a href="http://library.albany.edu/circ/notonshelf">Not On Shelf Form : If Minerva indicates your item should be on the shelf but it is not, fill out the Not On Shelf form. We encourage you to exhaust all other options before filling this form out –make sure you’re at the library in which the book resides and that you’re in the right collection (you won’t find a reference book in the circulating collection!) Also, ask at the circulation desk to see if the book was recently checked back in. In the meantime, feel free to submit an ILL request to obtain the book from another library if the item can’t be located right away.

If there is a particular item that the University Libraries do not own but you feel should be in the collection, then fill out the Recommendation for Library Purchase Form. We take all recommendations into consideration, so don’t hesitate!

For more information on these services, ask a librarian!.

Blog post created by Jill Parsons

April 15, 2009

What’s New in the Information Commons.

Welcome back from Spring Break! Take a look at what new is being offered in the Information Commons:

Wireless Printing: That’s right, if you bring your laptop to the library (PC or Apple), you will be able to print right from them. You will need to download a client for each library printer you want to use. Then, when you go to print, you will be prompted to enter your netid and your document name (if your document has no name, it will be called “document 1�). Just as the desktop computers in the library, your document will stay in the printer queue for two hours and cost $.10 per page to print.

Virtual IC : The Information Commons page is now available virtually! There will be 15 “seats� (or simultaneous) users available at a time and you will see a secondary start button to click on which will open up the IC programs. Some things to keep in mind when using Virtual IC:


  • You must be on broadband to use Virtual IC, not dial-up.

  • You will not be able to access your drives while in Virtual IC. If you had previous work in another program, such as Word and it is saved on a flash or you C: drive for example, you won’t be able to open it in Virtual IC. If you want to access and save documents, use your S: drive. Any documents saved in mydocuments on the Virtual IC page will be lost once you log off.

Documents may be printed to local printers and they will be converted into pdf. Documents can also be emailed.
In the event you get dropped off the wireless, your information is retained for 15 minutes. Your “seat� in the Virtual IC is also retained for 15 minutes. After this time, your seat will be open for another patron and your work will be lost.

If you have questions about these services, make sure you ask our knowledgeable technology consultants located in the Information Commons. At Dewey, the consultants are available Mon-Thurs 2pm-8pm, Fri 2pm-5pm, and Sun 2pm-6pm

Blog post created by Jill Parsons

April 8, 2009

Save Yourself a Trip with Document Delivery

The University Libraries have a lot of journals available online for you to access from your home. However, some journals are only available in print. If you find an article citation in a database and the libraries only have that journal in print, then submit a UA Delivery request.

UA Delivery (or Document Delivery) is a library service to have print articles scanned and sent to you electronically in PDF. This way, you can save a trip to the library and print out the article from home at your convenience. All you need to do is log in to Illiad to complete your request. You will need to have the full article citation and the call number of the journal, which can be found by searching Minerva. Make sure that the library definitely owns the journal so we can get the articles to you as soon as we can!

UA Delivery also offers books from one library to be sent to your pickup library. For example, if your pickup library is Dewey and you need a book located at the Science Library, you can submit a UA Delivery request to have the book sent down to Dewey for you to pickup. This way, you can save time traveling back and forth between libraries. This request is also completed through Illiad.

Keep in mind that we will process a total of three UA Delivery requests per day.

Please ask a reference librarian if you have any questions about UA Delivery or need assistance completing a request, we're here to help!

April 1, 2009

Cite with Style!

Using correct and precise citations in your papers is extremely important. Dewey has a number or electronic and print resources to help you cite you references correctly without being accused of plagiarism.

If you’re writing a paper from home and don’t have access to a style guide book, check our online citation style guides. There you will guides that will help you cite using APA, ASA (American Sociological Association), MLA and Chicago styles. There is also an informational link that will help you understand when to cite information in your paper. These “cheat sheets� were designed to show you how to cite just right.

If you prefer using a style guide in print, Dewey has many of those available as well:

APA:
Concise Rules of APA Style: REF BF 76.7 C66 2005
APA Style Guide to Electronic References: REF BF76.6 P84X 2007

ASA:
ASA Style Guide: Ref HM 73 A437X 1997

MLA:
MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing: REF PN 147 G444 2008

Chicago:
The Chicago Manual of Style: REF Z 253 U69 2003
See also: A Manual for Writers of Research Papers, Theses, and Dissertations : Chicago Style for Students and Researchers: REF LB 2369 T8 2009

Lastly, you may have heard of the popular citation-generator program called EndNote. This program helps you assemble a bibliography and references as you write your paper. Dewey offers classes in EndNote too. The last one for this semester is April 29th at 2:00pm. If you’re interested, make sure you sign up for this free workshop by contacting the reference desk (phone: 442-3691; email: Dewclass@albany.edu, or online.

As always, if you have a question about styling your citations correctly, ask a librarian.

Blog post created by Jill Parsons

March 25, 2009

Where to find E-Books

There has been a lot of buzz lately about e-books and fortunately for you, the University Libraries have a growing collection of e-books. While you can’t do a search for e-books only in Minerva, they will appear in a regular book search in the catalog. The "Location" field for these books will contain an online link which will take you to the text of the e-book.

The University Libraries have certain collections of e-books available for you to browse through. Many of these collections are for academic purposes so they are great additions to your research. The collections include e-books on subjects ranging from computer science to math and history. In addition, on our Databases and Indexes list, be sure to look at NetLibrary. Entering NetLibrary through Databases and Indexes, you can create a user profile which will give you the option of “checking out� a book. Instead of searching NetLibrary each time for the same book, you can store it in a list of favorites to refer to multiple times. Check out these resources today!

If you are using e-books or any other electronic resource for your papers, you will need to know the correct citations for referencing. The APA Style Guide to Electronic Reference online will show you how to cite online resources. (The complete Chicago Manual of Style is also available in e-book form.)

Don't forget to Ask a Librarian if you need more assistance.

Blog post created by Jill Parsons

March 18, 2009

The library: More Than Just Books and Computers.

The first things that come to mind when thinking about the library are often books, journals and computers workstations. But, did you know that Dewey also has other equipment available for patrons to use, such as laptops, a scanner, and a DVD player?

If you would like to borrow one of our two laptops available for use, ask at the circulation desk. You may borrow for up to 4 hours, or up until 30 minutes before the library closes. All the basic software, such as Microsoft Office and Firefox browser are on the laptops. Check out our policies page for more information about our laptop lending services.

Additionally, patrons at Dewey can use the scanner station and/or the DVD player. Both are located in the back of the library by the microfilm collection. The scanner is hooked into a computer for public use, so when you put in your NetID and password, you’re set to go. Remember to bring a flash drive or save the scanned items to your S: drive.

The DVD player is hooked up to a TV on a cart. You may also borrow headphones from circulation to listen to a DVD or VHS.

As always, if you need any assistance using these items, we're here to help! Ask at either at the circulation or reference desk.

Blog post created by Jill Parsons

March 11, 2009

The Pressure's On... We Can Help!

It’s time for midterms! If you are feeling stressed and worrying about how you’re going to get all your papers and projects in on time, let a reference librarian help you cut to the chase. We can help save you time with your research, especially if you’ve come to a road block. Plus, we’re here for you need us and will answer your questions within 24 hours – or less!

From home, feel free to send us an email , IM or even a text message if you have a question. Or, you can give us a call right at the desk and speak with a librarian directly at 442-3691.

Have a more in-depth question that you would like to receive one-on-one assistance with? Then feel free to make an appointment with one of our knowledgeable subject specialists . Here at Dewey, we have subject specialists for those in Information Science, Criminal Justice, Gerontology, Social Welfare, Law, Public Administration and Political Science.

You can always stop by the reference desk in person during our reference hours: Monday-Thursday 10am-8pm, Friday 1pm-5pm, Saturday Noon-5pm and Sunday 1pm-7pm.

Remember, all our web-based library services, such as Minerva, online databases, ILL and UA Delivery are available 24/7 right from your home. If you have any questions about these services, let us know and we will assist you!

We wish you the best of luck as you arrive at the half point in the semester!

March 4, 2009

Dictionaries: Webster's and Beyond...

You are probably familiar with a basic dictionary, right? In Dewey, there is a huge, old-school dictionary on the reference stacks, open to any random page at any given time. While that dictionary never fails, there are a multitude of dictionaries online and you can access them right on our library online reference page. Here, you will find English language dictionaries, such as the Oxford English Dictionary, as well as foreign language dictionaries and thesauri . Take a look at the specialty dictionaries we list, such as Cliché Finder or RhymeZone in case you’re writing a rhyming poem and can’t find the right word.

Some dictionaries are subject specific and are designed to help you understand terms and phrases within your field. Dewey has a variety of dictionaries in both print and online to help you with your area of study:

Law and Public Administration:
Black’s Law Dictionary (deluxe 18th edition), Dewey REF KF 156 B53X 2004
Prince’s Dictionary of Legal Citations (17th edition), Dewey REF KF 246 P73 2006
Law Dictionary.com http://dictionary.law.com/

Criminal Justice:
The American Dictionary of Criminal Justice: Key Terms and Major Court Cases, Dewey REF HV 7411 C48 2005
The Concise Dictionary of Crime and Justice, Dewey REF HV 6017 D38 2002
Dictionary of Criminal Justice, Dewey REF HV 6017 .S24 2006
National Criminal Justice Thesaurus http://www.ncjrs.gov/app/search/ThesaurusSearch.aspx

Social Welfare:
The Social Work Dictionary, Dewey REF HV 12 B37 2003
Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, Dewey REF Z 695.1 P7 T48

Information Science:
International Dictionary of Library Histories, Dewey REF Z 721 I572 2001
Dictionary of Information Science and Technology, Dewey REF Z 1005 W35 1992
Dictionary of Library and Information Science, Dewey REF Z 1006 R45 2004
OLDIS: Online Dictionary for Library and Information Science http://lu.com/odlis/


If you need help using these subject specific dictionaries, feel free to Ask a Librarian for help!

Blog post created by Jill Parsons

February 25, 2009

Take Your Projects to a Colorful, New Level.

Color printing can enhance any paper or presentation for class, and fortunately for you, Dewey owns it’s very own color printer. Copies are $.50 a page and works just as the other printers do while using computers in the Dewey commons. Where is the printer located? It is right in front of the new books shelf, or just to the left of the reference collection behind the slide show monitor.

Be sure to also check out the libraries' policy page on printing.

Blog post created by Jill Parsons

February 18, 2009

Scouring the Ends of the Earth!

Have you ever been disappointed to learn that your library does not own the item you are looking for, thinking you must now make trips to many different libraries in your area to find that item? If so, read on.

When you know the library does not own the item you need, make an Interlibrary Loan, aka ILL, request and let us find it for you—you don’t even have to leave home! When you login to ILLIAD , fill out information on the item you are looking for and submit your request. From there, you ILL staff will search certain databases and library networks to see which libraries own this item. From there, they will ask a library to loan the item out to your institution. Sometimes the item is owned by a local library. However, sometimes your item might be owned by a library across the country! No matter what library houses the item, if they participate in ILL, they will send that item to your library and it will eventually wind up in your hands. In fact, UAlbany has seen ILL items come in all the way from Europe and Japan. The ILL department will try every library that owns the material until they are able to obtain it for you.
Keep in mind, ILL is not just for books. If you need an article from a journal that the University Libraries does not own, you can submit a request to get that article as well.

You can also make requests directly from Worldcat, which is a database of participating library catalogs. Simply click on the "Submit Request to UAlbany" link at the top of the item record, and a new window will pop up which allows you to log in to ILLiad. Once logged in, the record will be filled out for you, simply give it a quick scan to make sure the form is correct, and click "Submit."

So, who is eligible for ILL? How long does it take? Are there any exceptions? For the answer to more questions like these, see our ILL FAQ page.

Lastly, if you need help signing up with ILLIAD or making a request once you are in there, ask a reference librarian for help.

Blog post created by Jill Parsons

February 11, 2009

New books? Where?

Dewey Library is always adding new books to its collection and luckily for you, they are conveniently located on one groups of shelves on the main floor. Not sure exactly where it is? Here are some points of interest: Once you find the reference collection in the center of the main floor, look to your left and you will see the new books shelf. It is directly to the right of the color printer, which sits right behind the TV monitor playing the slide show.

Now that you’ve found the shelf, here are some new books you might want to check out:

Shanachie Tour: A Library Road Trip Across America (Z 720 A46 N4 2008)

Serving Urban Teens ( Z 718.5 B74 2008)

The Emotionally Intelligent Social Worker (HV40.35 H69 2008)

Retooling for an Aging America: Building the Health Care Workforce (RA564.8 .R48 2008)

DARFUR: The Long Road to Disaster (DT546.48 .B87 2008)

Biological Weapons: From the Invention of State-Sponsored Programs to Contemporary Bioterrorism (UG447.8 G85 2005)

Unlike some libraries, the borrowing period for new books is the same as that of the regular circulating collection. Stop by and browse the new book shelf -- you never know what you might find!

Blog post created by Jill Parsons

February 4, 2009

Reference Resources: Finding Quotations

“I don't know the key to success, but the key to failure is trying to please everybody.�

Can you identify who said the above statement? If not, you should check out our many resources on finding famous quotations, or who has spoken a particular saying. The University Libraries new homepage has an Online Reference section where you can go to “Quotations� and find many online sources for popular quotation. These online dictionaries are helpful in that you can find the information you are looking for, whether you already have a quote but don’t know the person who spoke it, or vice versa. Also, if you are looking for quotes on specific subjects, such as love or success, you can search under those themes and pick ones yourself. The database CredoReference offers many quotations resources, such as Bloomsbury Biographical Dictionary of Quotations and Collins Concise Dictionary of Quotations. There are also links to other free online sources such as Quoteworld and Bartlett's Familiar Quotations.

In addition to our online resources, Dewey owns many reference books to research quotations. Check out the following:

The Quotable Book Lover (Ref PN 6084 B65 Q68 1999) contains quotes and famous sayings about reading and loving books.

The Quotable Woman (Ref PN 6081.5 N49 1992) is quotes said by only women.

The Oxford Dictionary of Political Quotations (Ref PN6084 P6 O94 2005) not only provides political quotes but by whom they were said, when and where.

Bartlett’s Familiar Quotations (Ref PN 6081 B27 1992) is in print, 16th edition with the most updated version found online.

And the mystery person who said the opening quote? Bill Cosby.

Blog post created by Jill Parsons

January 25, 2009

Take a Tour Today!

An orientation tour of the library can be a very helpful way to familiarize yourself with library resources, materials, services, and equipment. You will gain a basic understanding of where everything is located in the library, learn about our services, and find out how to get help when you need it.

There are two orientation tours this week, one today (Monday) at 9:30am, and one tomorrow (Tuesday), also at 9:30am. To sign up, call the Reference Desk at 442-3691, drop by the Reference Desk, or fill out our online registration form.

December 3, 2008

Help With the Crunch!

Where did the semester go?? You might be asking yourself this as you see exams and term paper deadlines looming right around the corner. Perhaps you feel there isn’t enough time to get all your research and studying done, or you feel completely lost and stressed out about all you have to do.

Fear not! The Dewey librarians are here to help you get through your final tasks for the end of the semester. We can help you get right down to business and cut to the chase for your papers. Instead of going around in circles of confusion, let us save you valuable time and make you feel less agitated as you wrap up your classes.

Our reference librarians are here to assist you Monday-Thursday 10am-8pm, Friday 10am-5pm, Saturday Noon-5pm and Sunday 1pm-7pm. Ask us in person, by phone: (518) 442-33691, by email or IM. Also, remember if you have more specific research to do, make an appointment with a subject specialist to get you on the fast track to finishing that term paper.

For those times when you’re burning the midnight oil, Dewey is still there for you. Remember, Minerva and our databases are available 24/7 at the main library page. You can also email your reference questions and a librarian will answer you within 24 hours. Need an article scanned or an item from another library? Our UA Delivery and ILL services are there when you need them, day or night. We can’t provide you with the coffee to stay up all night plugging away at your studies, but we can get you the information and resources you need when you need them.

We wish you the best of luck!

November 26, 2008

It's Not in the Dewey Library? Here are Some Solutions!

The University Libraries offer two great services: UA Delivery (aka: Document Delivery) and ILL, or Interlibrary Loan. If you’re unsure the difference between the two, or have never heard of these services, read on:

Document Delivery can be used for both books and journal articles. For example, say you regularly study at the Dewey Library and it is the library where you usually pick up your books. If you needed a book from either the Science Library or University Library, you could submit a UA Delivery request to have that item sent to Dewey, your designated library. Also, let’s say you need an article that you can’t locate the full text of online either in Minerva or the databases, but you know one of the three libraries has the article in print. Instead of making the trip to the library to photocopy the article, submit a UA Delivery request to have that article scanned and made into a pdf to be emailed directly to you. Saves on gas and time! The library will process up to three requests per day. Just make sure you can’t find the full text online first! For more information, visit the UA Delivery Services link.

Interlibrary Loan (ILL) is a library service to use when none of the three libraries has the item or article you are looking for. The library will search other library collections to borrow that item and then loan it to you. Requests usually take only a few days, but some can take up to 2 or 3 weeks depending on how long it takes to locate the item. For more information, visit the ILL (http://library.albany.edu/ill/ ) page.

To use both of these services, you will need to sign into ILLIAD, and fill out a request. When using ILLiad for the first time, make sure you click the "First Time User" link so that we can confirm you as a UA student, faculty or staff, and you can set your designated pick-up library and e-mail address.

Still confused? Have more questions? Ask a reference librarian for help. Take advantage of these great services today!

Blog post created by Jill Parsons

November 5, 2008

The Latest Technology Puts the Library at Your Fingertips…

Did you know that you can ask a reference librarian a question without even stepping foot inside of the library? We are accessible remotely using a variety of the latest technologies. Not only can you send us email (Ask-a-Librarian), you can also instant message (IM), or text message (SMS) us!

Email us any time day or night. E-mail works best for when you have a somewhat in-depth question or if it is not essential for us to answer you right away. We strive to answer all e-mail questions within 24 hours.

Instant Message us when your question is not too detailed. Instant messaging is available through Meebo – you do not need to download any IM programs to send us an IM. Simply access the Contact Us page (http://library.albany.edu/contactus.html). Please remember to keep your browser open while you wait for our response.

Text message us with a brief message by dialing 265010 and then beginning your message with ualibraries: (include the colon). Text us if you need a short, factual answer to a question.

Check the Contact Us page for available hours for IM and text messaging service.

Of course, when you are able to come to the library, we are also happy to help you in person – drop by during reference hours, or call us (442-3691) to make an appointment. We are continuing to find ways to make it easier for you to reach us, and would love to hear your thoughts on how these services are working. E-mail us or leave a comment on this blog.

Blog post created by Judith Mueller

November 2, 2008

Dewey Workshops and Classes - Week of 11/3 - 11/7

http://library.albany.edu/dewey/forms/class_registration_spring06.htmlThis week, Dewey will be hosting one workshop:

Friday, 11/7:
1:00pm: Nonprofit Organizations—Information Sources

This session will inform you of both print and electronic information sources about Nonprofits. This is a great workshop to take if you’re interested in learning more about electronic databases on this topic as well.
Want to register? Sign up online , at the Reference Desk, by calling the Reference Desk at 422-3691, or by sending email to dewclass@albany.edu.

Blog post created by Jill Parsons

October 29, 2008

Get Help With Cited References

‘Tis the season…to write papers! One of the more tricky parts of writing a research paper is using the correct citation format and being consistent throughout. Instead of using guesswork to cite your references, let the University Libraries help you do it the correct way, right from your own computer. At the Libraries Homepage, you will find under Quick Links information on both Citation and Style Guides pages.

Citation generators take your information about a resouce and create bibliographies, notes, and in-tect citations in the format of your choosing. If you’re interested in citation generators, the Citation page lists a variety of citation-generating software, including Son of a Citation Machine, KnightCite and the very popular EndNote. Best of all, most of these generators are free! The Libraries are here to link you up with whichever citation generator you would like to try depending on which style you use.

Into citing references, old-school style? Then the Style Guides page will link you up with online resources to help you get your citation right. Here, you will find a list of the most used style guides in academic writing, including APA and MLA. This link is handy when you are word-processing your paper and you need a quick look-up on citing your research.

Still have a citation question? You can always Ask A Librarian!

Blog post created by Jill Parsons

October 26, 2008

Dewey Workshops for this Week

Do you want to know more about ‘blogs’, ‘wikis’, and ‘RSS’? You can learn more about all of these items and more by taking the Web to Communicate and Collaborate on Tuesday.

Are you doing research on nonprofit organizations? Get help by taking Nonprofit Organizations-Information Sources offered this Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday.

Are you a social welfare student doing research on clinical social work practice? You can get help by taking Evidence Based Practice offered this Wednesday.

Tuesday 10/28:
3:30 pm: Using the Web to Communicate and Collaborate
4:30 pm: Nonprofit Organizations-Information Sources

Wednesday 10/29:
2:00 pm: Evidence Based Practice

Thursday 10/30:
4:30 pm: Nonprofit Organizations-Information Sources

Friday 10/31:
1:00 pm: Nonprofit Organizations-Information Sources

All classes are held in the classroom in Dewey Library’s basement. You can register for these classes online , at the Reference Desk, by calling the Reference Desk at 422-3691, or by sending email to dewclass@albany.edu.

If you find that you are unable to attend a class that you have registered for, please call the Reference Desk or send email to let us know.

Blog post created by Judith Mueller

October 22, 2008

10 Things You May Not Know about the Library (in no particular order)

1. The Dewey Library specializes in the following subject areas:

  • Law and Public Policy/Administration
  • Social Welfare
  • Criminal Justice
  • Library and Information Studies

In addition, Dewey houses many other cross-disciplinary resources available both online and in print.

2. Coincidentally, if you need help researching in any of the above areas, contact one of Dewey Library’s bibliographers. Check out the Dewey Library subject specialists page and make an appointment today to learn more about researching in any of these particular areas.

3. Technology Consultants are available at Dewey for those times you’re having problems with certain programs, such as Microsoft Word, Adobe, etc. ITS consultants are available at the library seven days a week.

4. The Dewey Library is equipped with more than just computers, photocopiers and printers. There is a scanner, color printer and microfilm reader/printer all located on the main floor. This technology may also be available at the other two university libraries.

5. Are you a faculty member? There is a faculty resources page just for you! Educate yourself on everything from placing books on reserve to information on promotion and tenure.

6. You might think the Dewey Library’s name has something to do with the Dewey Decimal System. While that would be fitting, the library is actually named after New York state governor Thomas Edmund Dewey, who served from 1943-1955. Governor Dewey recommended that New York create its own State University, so on September 8, 1988, the Dewey Graduate Library adopted his name in dedication. To learn more, see Governor Dewey’s biography on the Dewey homepage.

7. Also of historical mention are the stained glass windows that so beautifully decorate the Dewey walls on the main floor. The windows themselves are gifts of various graduating classes from 1910-1929. However, history on some of the windows remains a mystery. Photos of the Dewey windows are uploaded to Flickr and each image includes the story and meaning behind each window.

8. In addition to borrowing books at Dewey, you may also check out other various items such as earphones and a laptop. If ever you forget yours at home, let the circulation staff at Dewey come to your rescue.

9. Dewey and the other university libraries have a wealth of software available on terminals in the Information Commons. These programs may be costly to purchase for your own personal computer, so let Dewey offer them to you, just for being a student! And while you’re at it, check to see which computers are being occupied at any given time.

10. You can tell us what you think about the Dewey Library! If ever you have a suggestion or a comment about our services, you may submit a suggestion online or leave a comment on this blog.

Blog post created by Jill Parsons

October 19, 2008

Free Classes at Dewey this Week

This week’s free workshops offered at Dewey include Introduction to Federal Public Policy Research, Introduction to Research Databases, and Evidence Based Practice.

Do you need help doing research? Try taking Introduction to Research Databases offered Wednesday.

Are you doing research on federal public policies? Get help by taking Introduction to Federal Public Policy Research offered this Tuesday.

Are you a social welfare student doing research on clinical social work practice? You can get help by taking Evidence Based Practice offered this Wednesday.

Tuesday 10/21:
4:30 pm: Introduction to Federal Public Policy Research

Wednesday 10/22:
10:00 am: Introduction to Research Databases
2:00 pm: Evidence Based Practice

All classes are held in the classroom in Dewey Library’s basement. You can register for these classes online, at the Reference Desk, by calling the Reference Desk at 422-3691, or by sending email to dewclass@albany.edu.

If you find that you are unable to attend a class that you have registered for, please call the Reference Desk or send email to let us know.

Blog post created by Judith Mueller

October 15, 2008

Downstairs at Dewey for Quiet Study, Groups

Downstairs at Dewey, we offer both a quiet area to study as well as two areas where groups can study together. If you are looking for a quiet place to study, try the basement at Dewey Library. This area is expected to be quiet so that everyone can study without distraction.

If you have group projects that you need to work on with other people and with access to computers, try either the study area located in the room (peristyle) across from the downstairs classroom.

Also,when the classroom is not needed for a class, you can check out the key to the room from the circulation desk, and use it to practice presentations or work on computers in a group. To reserve the classroom in advance, please contact Deborah Bernnard.

All the new computers downstairs have the ITS supplied software that has previously only been available on the main floor at Dewey and at other locations on campus.
So whether you need to study in peace and quiet or you need to study with fellow classmates, check out Dewey Library’s basement.

Blog post created by Judith Mueller

October 12, 2008

This Week's Workshops at Dewey

This week’s workshops at Dewey include Introduction to EndNote®, Introduction to Research Databases, Introduction to Federal Public Policy Research, and Minerva, University at Albany’s Online Catalog.

Tuesday 10/14:
10:00 am: Introduction to EndNote® - for help with creating bibliographies

Wednesday 10/15:
4:30 pm: Introduction to Research Databases – for help with doing research

Thursday 10/16:
4:30 pm: Introduction to Federal Public Policy Research – for help with doing federal public policy research

Friday 10/17:
1:00 pm: Introduction to Federal Public Policy Research - for help with doing federal public policy research
3:30 pm: Minerva, University at Albany’s Online Catalog – for help with our online catalog

All classes are held in the classroom in Dewey Library’s basement. You can register for these classes online , at the Reference Desk, by calling the Reference Desk at 422-3691, or by sending email to dewclass@albany.edu.

If you find that you are unable to attend a class that you have registered for, please call the Reference Desk or send email to let us know.

Blog post created by Judith Mueller

October 8, 2008

Research Help Available on Library Website

Grad students – this blog is for you! Did you know the University Libraries has a webpage for tutorials and even more pointers on getting your research going? Check out the UA Libraries' User Education Homepage .

Tutorials are a great way to learn more about making the most of your research. Librarians have created interactive tutorials on virtual library tours, plagiarism and even web design. Best of all, you can take them on your own time wherever you’d like. These simple tutorials might be just what you need to ace your next research assignment.

Iguides offer online tips on doing internet research with some in-depth descriptions of some helpful websites, such as Ask.com. The Internet is a wonderful source of information, but as you might know, finding valuable information is tricky. Let this page help you make the most of internet research.

Also on this page are resources to help you cite works in your paper, get through the research process and find more information information on miscellaneous topics, such as speeches, literary criticism and grant information.

Finally, you should know that Dewey Library has their research guides in criminal justice and social welfare online. You can access these electronic handouts at the Dewey Graduate Library Handouts page found on the workshops page.

Feel free to visit any of these links and see how they can help your next project.

Blog post created by Jill Parsons

October 5, 2008

This Week's Free Workshops at Dewey

Social Welfare students if you haven’t taken the Social Welfare Research Seminar yet, there are only two more sessions this semester. This week’s Social Welfare Research Seminar is offered on Wednesday at 4:30 pm.

Researchers, if you want to learn how to use EndNote® to easily compile your bibliography, we are offering the Introduction to EndNote® workshop on Tuesday at 4:30.

Tuesday 10/7:
4:30 pm: Introduction to EndNote®

Wednesday 10/8:
4:30 pm Social Welfare Research Seminar

To check out the full schedule of workshops offered at Dewey, see the online listing. All classes are held in the classroom in Dewey Library’s basement. You can register for these classes online, at the Reference Desk, by calling the Reference Desk at 422-3691, or by sending email to dewclass@albany.edu.

If you find that you are unable to attend a class that you have registered for, please call the Reference Desk or send email to let us know.

Blog post created by Judith Mueller

September 24, 2008

Services for Disabled Patrons in Dewey Library

The University Libraries offer special services for patrons who are either permanently or temporarily disabled. Students need to first register with the Disability Resource Center located in Campus Center 137. Then, students, faculty, or staff members who need help in the libraries can register with the library online, or by contacting Kabel Nathan Stanwicks (kstanwicks@uamail.albany.edu or 442-3578).

For help with services at Dewey Library feel free to contact Lindsay Van Berkom (lvanberkom@uamail.albany.edu or 442-3696) or a reference librarian for help with the work station reserved for patrons with disabilities. This workstation includes a scanner, microphone, and headphones along with Jaws 7.10 screen reader software, Kurzweil 1000 software which makes printed and electronic text available for those blind or visually impaired. It also has Dragon Naturally Speaking 9.0 speech recognition software.

General access to Dewey Library is through the first floor of Draper Hall. To access the classroom and group study areas on the mezzanine level, you must first alert library staff to unlock the entrance door. Then you can enter through the basement of Draper Hall.

Photocopying and campus book delivery service is provided by UA Delivery. If further assistance is needed, please ask library staff or call (518) 442-3696. For more information, check out our page about Library Services for Persons with Disabilities at all libraries on campus.

September 17, 2008

Who is that Person Sitting Behind the Reference Desk?

Why, it’s the Reference Librarian! Perhaps you might be a little timid about approaching a librarian with help. But never fear – we are here to help you with anything you could possibly need for your next big assignment. Whether you’re trying to locate a book on the library shelves or need some great resources for that looming term paper, the reference librarians are here for you every step of the way.
Some things a reference librarian can help you with:

1. Locating resources: Where can I find this book at this call number? How can I access the UAlbany databases? How to I use Inter-Library Loan? Where’s the copier? If ever you get lost finding what you need, just ask a librarian. They can guide you and provide assistance as necessary.

2. Evaluating online resources: Ok, so you’ve located this great website for your research paper. But is it really what you are looking for? Not all web pages are created equal. Is the source of the information authoritative and reliable? Some free web sites provide scholarly information but others may have a bias that is not easily detected. If you’re unsure whether a website is reliable enough to include in a scholarly assignment, a reference librarian will work with you to help you select high-quality websites or materials in the library for your project.

3. Where else to look: Even if you know your databases inside and out, there’s still a possibility that there are even more sources out there to give you more information on your topic. A reference librarian can lead you to anything from print resources, to online databases, to free online sources you might not know about. We can help you discover which ones are right for you.

4. How to use tricky print resources: Just as databases differ from each other, so do print resources. Thesauri and law reporters are just a couple examples of some books that might leave a user thinking “huh?� But, don’t just put those items back on the shelf because you’re unsure how to use them. Bring them to the reference librarian and we’ll walk you through not only how to use these resources, but how they can help you in your studies.

5. Provide more in-depth research help: Reference librarians can get you started when you have no idea where to start when faced with a daunting assignment or paper. A librarian can help you with those tricky parts in your research when you find yourself stuck. No matter how simple or difficult your questions may be, the reference librarians are up for the challenge of helping you. If you would like more time with a librarian than a quick session at the reference desk, feel free to make an appointment with any of our bibliographers at the Dewey Library.

So, how do you let a reference librarian know you need assistance? You may think you will need to make a special trip to the library to ask a question, but this is not always the case. The University Libraries offer off-campus reference services through email, IM and phone. To use these services, visit the Dewey Library Contact Us page. Of course if it is convenient, feel free to pay us a visit at the desk.

September 9, 2008

Help When You Just Can’t Get to the Library

Did you know that if you need reference help and you can’t get to the library, you can contact a reference librarian by phone, email (Ask a Librarian), instant message (IM), and now even by text message (SMS)?

If you need help you can call a reference librarian by phone at 442-3691. The reference librarian on duty will answer your call, or if there is no one available feel free to leave a voice mail which includes your telephone number. Dewey’s Reference Desk is staffed:

Monday - Thursday: 10am - 8pm
Friday: 10am - 5pm
Saturday: 12pm - 5pm
Sunday: 1pm - 7pm

Instant Messaging is available through Meebo – you do not need to download any IM programs to send us an IM. Simply access the Contact Us page http://library.albany.edu/contactus.htm . Please remember to keep your browser window open until you receive a response from the librarian.

You can now send us a text message by dialing 265010 and then beginning your message with ualibraries: (include the colon). Text us if you need a short, factual answer to a question. You can text message or IM a question to a reference librarian during the following hours:

Monday – Thursday: 10am - 9pm
Friday: 10am - 4pm
Saturday: 1pm - 5pm
Sunday: 1pm - 9pm

E-mail us if you have a more in depth question or if it is not essential for us to answer you right away. We strive to answer all e-mail questions within 24 hours.

Of course, when you are able to come to the library, we are also happy to help you in person – drop by during reference hours, or call us (442-3691) to make an appointment!

September 2, 2008

Make Sure to Always Have Your SUNYCard at the Library!

You already know that you use your SUNYCard to do many things on campus (buying books in the bookstore, purchasing meals in the dining rooms, entering buildings, purchasing munchies, doing laundry, etc.). But did you know that you need your SUNYCard in the libraries as well?

You need to present your SUNYCard in order to borrow books from the University at Albany libraries. Did you know you can also use your SUNYCard to pay for printing and photocopying? You can even use it to pay for any library fines you may owe.

All you need to do is make sure that you have money in your Podium account on your SUNYCard. You can put money into your podium account one of the following ways: by going to the SUNYCard office in the Campus Center (Room B-52), by calling the SUNYCard office at 442-5989, by mailing in a check or your credit card number on the appropriate form, by going to PodiumNet and paying with a credit card, or by using cash at the SUNYCard terminals.

Dewey Library has a SUNYCard terminal near the reference desk. Should you forget your SUNYCard, you can purchase a Podium card for $1.00 but then you will need to add money to the account itself. Also the Podium card simply allows printing and photocopying – you cannot borrow materials with it. To save yourself $1.00, remember to bring your SUNYCard when you come to the library!

August 27, 2008

Save Time Later -- Attend a Workshop Now

Each Semester Dewey Graduate Library offers an array of workshops for new and returning students. These workshops are designed to help students become acclimated to the library and its print and online resources. Students who are specializing in Information Science, Criminal Justice and Social Welfare may wish to take an instruction session that is specifically geared to their discipline. However, all students will find classes on research databases, Minerva, the online catalog and conducting research from home useful.

Take a look at our schedule of classes. You can register online, in person at the Dewey Reference Desk or call us at 442-3691. All of these sessions are free. Students often comment that they find the classes “helpful time savers.� After all, if you already know how to use our information resources, you won’t have to spend valuable research time trying to figure out how to access an article.

For more information about Dewey Library’s instructional offerings, email Dewclass@uamail.albany.edu or call the reference desk at 442-3691.

Blog post created by Deborah Bernnard

August 19, 2008

New Ebscohost 2.0 interface

Used by many researchers for its competence and comprehensiveness, EBSCO’s Academic Search Premiere was recently re-released as EBSCO’s Academic Search Premier 2.0. Fear not however, all the content coverage that drew so many people to Academic Search Premier 1.0 remains; it’s just that much easier to access with the 2.0 version. For a brief tutorial and screen shots, expand this posting.

Continue reading "New Ebscohost 2.0 interface" »

August 7, 2008

Scopus is here!

The University Libraries are proud to announce the availability of Scopus, a database focused on scholarly publications in the sciences and social sciences. The unique and powerful ability gained from using Scopus is the ability to not only find relevant articles on your topic, but to determine the scholarly value of your results.

While the search interface functions like many other databases-- enter any combination of search terms and fields (author, title, abstract, etc), the results from those searches are where Scopus differentiates itself. Users can sort results by clicking on the “Documents,� “Authors,� “Date, “Source Title� or "Cited By� tabs. In addition to offering quick access to abstracts and some full-text articles, Scopus also allows users to track articles that have cited each item in your result list. If, for example, you’re deciding between including two articles in your research, looking at the far right hand column, “Cites� of the search returns, lets you see the number of times an article has been cited. Clicking on that number brings up those very articles. Such functions have been used for promotion and tenure decisions (Scopus also offers several tools to analyze an institution’s, publication’s, or author’s scholarly output and influence – contact a Reference Librarian for further information.)

The very user-friendly and accessible format lets casual searchers and beginning researchers becomes more familiar with how scholarly thought has progressed from one article to succeeding publications. Setting up an account lets users utilize the “citation tracker� feature, where users may receive updates when newly published articles cite a chosen article or author. All results and analyses can be exported to any number of end-user external programs – including Excel, RefWorks and EndNote.

There’s a lot to do and see in Scopus, so it’s nice that there is a thoroughly researched, well-presented and readable “Help� function. You can find it as a running header throughout your searches in the top right hand corner of every page. Clicking on the help icon brings up answers to almost every question one might have about Scopus.

Scopus is accessible through the Databases and Indexes link on the University Libraries main web page. If you need help using Scopus or any other resource, feel free to drop by the reference desk or call us at 442-3691 to make an appointment, or Ask a Librarian!

Blog post created by Michael V. Daly

July 29, 2008

Still More E-Books!

In addition to the Greenwood Digital Collection and History Reference Online, we also now have access to the Sage eReference Encyclopedias. As is the case with printed encyclopedias, the Sage eReference Encyclopedias are a good place to start doing research. They provide brief articles about many different related subjects which could be useful when needing to select a topic for a research paper or project.

This collection of encyclopedias covers issues for anyone interested in Public Administration and Policy, Social Welfare, Public Health, Criminal Justice, Legal Issues, or Information and Library Science among other subjects.

In particular, if you are interested in Public Administration and Policy, you might want to look at the following encyclopedia:
• Encyclopedia of Political Communication
• Encyclopedia of Organization Studies
• Encyclopedia of Activism and Social Justice
• Encyclopedia of Environment and Society

Those interested in Social Welfare might want to look at the following encyclopedias:
• Encyclopedia of Health and Aging
• Encyclopedia of Psychology and Law
• Encyclopedia of Educational Psychology
• Encyclopedia of Social Psychology
• 21st Century Psychology: A Reference Handbook

Those interested in Criminal Justice and issues related to the Law may find the following encyclopedias useful:
• Encyclopedia of Activism and Social Justice
• Encyclopedia of Law and Society: American and Global Perspectives
• Encyclopedia of Psychology and Law

And finally, those interested in Information and Library Science might be interested in the following encyclopedia:
• Encyclopedia of Geographic Information Science

You can access the Sage eReference Encyclopedias from the Library web page by selecting Databases and Indexes in the middle column. Then select the letter "S". (You can also access the individual encyclopedias directly using Minerva.)

Once you select the Sage eReference link, you can search through all of the encyclopedias in our subscription at once or you can search or browse in one encyclopedia at a time. Enter a simple keyword search or use the more advanced search features to narrow down your results.

You can browse by choosing an individual encyclopedia or by first choosing a particular subject. Subject browsing is helpful if you don’t know which encyclopedia might contain your particular information, because it displays all of the encyclopedias which contain information about that particular subject. Once you have selected a particular encyclopedia, you can browse by finding entries through thematic categories, by searching the entire list of entries, or by searching the contents of the index.

If you need help using the Sage eReference Encyclopedias please ask for help at the reference desk or by submitting your question to Ask a Librarian!

Blog post created by Judy Mueller

July 23, 2008

More E-Books Available!

Similar to our last post the University Libraries recently gained access to the Greenwood Digital Collection, a timely and topical collection of e-books. Many of the titles available in this new service are related to the social sciences.

For Political Science or Public Administration and Policy students:
• Reference Guides for States Constitutions – including New York, New Jersey, Maine, California, Connecticut, Rhode Island and Vermont
• War Powers: The President, the Congress and Questions of War
• My Fellow Americans: Presidential Addresses that Shaped History
• The Patriot Act: A Documentary and Reference Guide
• Landmark Supreme Court Cases: A Reference Guide
• Deepening Democracy: Global Governance and Political Reform in Latin America

Social Welfare scholars and students may find this titles useful:
• Bullying: A Handbook for Educators and Parents
• Critical Thinking and Learning: An Encyclopedia for Parents and Teachers
• Gender and Education: An Encyclopedia Volumes 1 &2
• Race, Ethnicity and Education (Volumes 1-4)

The Greenwood Digital Collection also contains numerous titles dealing with a wide range of Hispanic/Latino issues:
• Latinos in a Changing Society
• Latino Chronology: Chronologies of the American Mosaic
• U.S. Latino Issues
• The Mexican Americans
• Pancho Villa and the Black Pershing: The Punitive Expedition in Mexico.

You can access and browse the Greenwood Digital Collection by going to Databases and Indexes, from the University Libraries homepage and clicking on the letter “G�. Individual e-book titles can also be located by using Minerva, the University Libraries online catalog.

Each reference title is divided into sections which are viewable on the left side of the screen. This allows you to jump from one section to another with ease. If you need help using the Greenwood Digital Collection or any other resource, feel free to drop by the reference desk, make an appointment, or Ask a Librarian!

Blog post created by Michael V. Daly

July 15, 2008

New E-Book Collection

There’s a new addition to the University Libraries’ e-book collection -- History Reference Online. This collection contains topical and historical e-books, offering quick, informative information online. Although the resource has the word “history� in the title, the collection also contains a wide variety of resources related to the social sciences.

Titles that may be of interest to Social Welfare students include;
•Adolescence in America: An Encyclopedia
•Bilingual Education: A Reference Handbook
•Family in America: An Encyclopedia
•Immigration and Asylum: From 1900 to the Present

Criminal Justice students and/or those interested in Law may find these titles useful in their research:
•Conspiracy Theories in American History: An Encyclopedia
•Corporate Crime: A Reference Handbook
•Gun Control in the United States: A Reference Handbook
•Guns in American Society
•Right to Counsel and Privilege against Self-Incrimination
•Right to Vote, The: Rights and Liberties under the Law

For students engaged with topics relating to Political Science or Public Administration and Policy:
•Constitutional Convention of 1787, The: A Comprehensive Encyclopedia of America’s Founding
•Conflicts over Natural Resources: A Reference Handbook
•Colonialism: An International Social, Cultural, and Political Encyclopedia
•Propaganda and Mass Persuasion: A Historical Encyclopedia, 1500 to the Present
History Reference Online also offers reference handbooks on numerous countries including Brazil, Pakistan, Costa Rica, and Cuba.

The entire History Reference Online collection should interest Information Studies students engaged in looking at trends in Reference service, delivery of information services and the role of e-books and online sources.

You can locate History Reference Online by going to Databases and Indexes– clicking on the letter “H� is a convenient way to do this. Soon, the individual e-book titles will also be accessible through Minerva, the University Libraries' online catalog.

History Reference Online allows you to browse available titles from pre-set subject headings or do a more focused search using the advanced search tab. Each reference title is divided into sections which are viewable on the left side of the screen. This allows you to jump from one section to another with ease. If you need help using History Reference Online or any other resource, feel free to drop by the reference desk, make an appointment, or Ask a Librarian!.

Blog post created by Michael V. Daly

May 6, 2008

Alumni Privileges at UA Libraries

Spring semester classes are now over, and exams have begun. For those of your preparing to end your time here at UAlbany, we want to remind you of the services offered by the University Libraries that remain available to you long after you’ve written your last paper and turned in your final projects. We encourage you to view our page with the complete description of Alumni Services, but here are some of the highlights:

  • University Libraries offers borrowing privileges to those students who have received degrees from the University at Albany. Present a valid photo ID at the circulation desk (at any of the three libraries), and once your alumni status is confirmed, you will be able to check out up to 25 items for a 30 day loan period.
  • We also encourage alumni to take advantage of the reference services offered by librarians – available in person or through our electronic Ask-A-Librarian services. Our librarians will gladly assist with any research question and will help you locate the information you need.
  • The Interactive Media Center offers free technology instruction for students, staff and faculty which alumni may also attend.
  • Alumni access to the Libraries’ online databases and indexes is limited to on-site use. However you might find our list of free databases helpful .
  • You can also refer to this blog for the latest information on resources and services available.

So, even as your enter another stage of your life, remember that the University Libraries remain eager and willing to help you in your research and continuing education needs.

Blog post created by Michael Daly

April 29, 2008

Faculty Due Date is Tomorrow

Just a reminder: all materials currently on loan to faculty are due back tomorrow, April 30. You may renew your materials either in person or online.

Ph.D candidates have a fixed due date of May 31. Loans to Masters' students are for 90 days from checkout.

We appreciate your efforts to return or renew books in a timely manner. Questions about the library's lending policy? Check out our Circulation Services page, or call us at 442-3693.

April 22, 2008

New Guide for Citing Online Resources

The APA Style Guide to Electronic References is now available in both print and online format. As scholars and students know, providing accurate citations to information sources is an essential component of any research project or paper. Such research increasingly relies on documents in electronic formats, and it has not always been clear how to properly identify and cite these items. This new reference from the American Psychological Association offers researchers a comprehensive guide to citing digital materials. It is now available in print or online – there is a copy in the Dewey Reference section, and one on Reserve (Call Number: BF 76.7 P84X 2007). Search Minerva for the link to our electronic access.

Organized into categories ranging from reference materials such as online encyclopedias , to digital dissertations , to slightly more esoteric formats, such as audio podcasts -- this guide provides a quick overview of the type of material being discussed and provides specific citation examples.

Of particular note is the section on journal articles. The proliferation of journals now available full-text online (both with and without print counterparts), can make navigating the world of electronic citations somewhat cumbersome. Using simple language, the style guide erases much of the confusion. In particular, this section clarifies citing in situations when an item is pre-published on the web ahead of print, or when it has been assigned a Digital Object Identifier (DOI number). The style guide provides commentary explaining the differences between types of online journal articles to help you determine which citation format is most appropriate.

For a refresher on some of the more “standard� citation rules for APA and other formats, be sure and visit the University Libraries’ Style Guides and “How and When to Cite…� pages. These pages provide summaries of a wide variety of citation formats, and instructional resources to help you assure that you’ve properly attributed the sources in your research.

Reference Librarians can also help you answer any questions you have regarding when and how to cite a source. When in doubt, Ask a Librarian!

Blog post created by Michael Daly

April 7, 2008

Blog Searching Made Simple

With their rapid rise in popularity – over 100 million as of December 2007 – weblogs, or blogs, have become an almost unavoidable avenue of information. Internet-savvy scholars look for blogs that will point to potentially useful resources or news items that keep them current on their topic. However, finding blogs on your topic can be tricky; most general purpose search engines are not that effective at locating blogs. Here is a rundown of three popular search tools that specialize in retrieving information from blogs:

Google Blogsearch
Set up almost exactly like Google’s standard search engine, Blogsearch has special features that assist in searching blogs. One important feature to note – the basic search looks for your terms in individual posts of blogs, not for entire blogs devoted to your topic. Advanced Search allows refining your search of blog posts by limiting your terms to “all words� (i.e. “criminal justice and America� would search for “criminal� and “justice� and “America� anywhere in the post) or “exact phrase.� The lower search box allows you to specify that a term is found in the title of a blog; this will bring up a list of blogs that are more likely to be entirely about your topic. You can also search by URL or author. Because one of the benefits of reading blogs is the fact that they are frequently updated, the advanced form allows you to limit searching by how recently the item was posted to the web (up to one hour ago).

If you’re interested in receiving updates for the search terms you’ve entered you have the option of signing up for “Blog Alerts� which will send you email reminders when you’re search terms appear in postings and blogs. One disadvantage of Google Blogsearch is that it seems to push blogs using the Blogger platform (which it owns) to the top of your search results.

Bloglines
Similar in style and function to Blogsearch, Bloglines allows you to specifically search postings and blogs based on search terms you establish. Clicking on the “More Options� button brings up the advanced search option. Very precise searching is feasible on advanced search, as you may enter as many keywords or limits you need by clicking on the red “add an entry� tab. You can also limit by language(s) and dates. Bloglines also adds the options of letting you include or exclude news related blogs. Creating an account with Bloglines allows you to set search limits to include or exclude your established RSS feeds (using RSS feeds is like “subscribing� to blogs, in that it allows you to directly receive regular updates from your favorite blogs).

Technorati
Technorati functions on similar standards as the previous two examples, with some exceptions. One unique limit you may specify is the level of “Authority� a blog has. “Authority� is defined by Technorati by the quantity of web sites that link to the blog in the last six months (perhaps, instead of “authority,� they should use the term “popularity�). In addition, you can limit by language from the basic search screen. The “advanced search" option allows you to search blogs using many of the options offered by Blogsearch and Bloglines. Advanced search also lets you type in a URL, and it will find those blogs which link to it.

While blogs are usually not authoritative enough to use for research, they can point to some useful information. Here are a few that may be of interest to the Downtown Campus Community:

Criminal Justice Online
Government Jobs
LIS Scholarship
Social Welfare Spot

Blog post created by Michael V. Daly

March 18, 2008

Finding Dissertations

In addition to books, journal articles, and web sites, dissertations can be a valuable resource to assist in your research. The culmination of years of work in a graduate or PhD level program, a dissertation gives a glimpse of the breadth and depth of a topic, in addition to providing original research. The University Libraries offers users a few ways to locate and obtain dissertations.

From the University Libraries main web page click on “Databases and Indexes.� Browsing alphabetically by title, click on “D.� About halfway down the list you’ll see the links for “Dissertation & Theses� and “Dissertation and Theses @ SUNY Albany.�

Dissertation and Theses @ SUNY Albany contains the full text of dissertations and theses that have been written by students attending our university from 1997 to the present. In addition, all dissertations created at SUNY Albany going back, to the creation of the college in 1861, are indexed. Most of these entries offer an abstract and twenty-four page preview.

If you find a listing only available as an abstract and/or preview, you still have a couple of options for obtaining the complete document. The libraries have the majority of dissertations from our University available on microfilm. Searching Minerva by author, title or any combination of the two, you should be able to locate a copy of the dissertation at the University Libraries. Print copies of University at Albany dissertations from 1914 to the present are available in the Special Collections department, but they must be used on-site. If the full copy of the dissertation is not available from any of these locations, a last resort is to order the dissertation directly from the database.

Dissertations & Theses provides bibliographic information for dissertations and theses from over 600 accredited universities. With such large returns possible, refining and narrowing the focus of your search is important with this database (we suggest limiting keywords to citation and abstract, and providing a date range, if possible). Again, you’ll find that each result offers access to the abstract, and some offer a 24-page preview. Unfortunately, we do not have access to the full-text of these dissertations from outside our own university. To obtain one of these dissertations, submit an Interlibrary Loan request and we will do our best to obtain a copy from another library (usually from the university where the dissertation was created). If a dissertation is not available through interlibrary loan, you again have the option of ordering the dissertation directly from the Dissertations and Theses database.

The Center for Research Libraries provides access to dissertations published in foreign universities. Although their local database is no longer being updated, they do provide daily updates of their dissertation holdings to their catalog and WorldCat.

If you need further assistance or have any questions about how to search for dissertations and theses, we are happy to help. Drop by the Reference Desk, call us at 442-3691, or send us an e-mail.

Blog post created by Michael Daly

March 4, 2008

New Online: Locate Tests and Search Inside Reference Books

The UA Libraries have added new online resources we think you will find useful. Both can be found using the Libraries' Databases & Indexes page.

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Reference Universe essentially lets you "google" a collection of reference books. It serves as a master index to the contents of 10,000 subject encyclopedias and other reference works. This means you can enter a keyword search in Reference Universe and it will tell you the reference books which contain an entry on your topic. The results may link to the full text of entries in e-books owned by the Libraries, or the results may link to the Minerva catalog records for items we own in print.

testing resource.gif
The main feature of the Testing and Education Reference Center is a comprehensive full text database of practice tests and study manuals, covering everything from GED and college entrance exams to civil service and military placement tests. Updated montly, the Testing and Education Reference Center also includes searchable databases on a variety of educational programs, including: specialty and career, graduate, undergraduate, international, and distance learning. You can set up a personal profile to access features such as a resume builder, scholarship search, and to find out which colleges and universities are recruiting in your field.

We hope you will try these additions to our online collection. We welcome any questions or opinions on these (or any) library resources. We're also happy to provide assistance and/or tips to help you use them. Leave a comment on this blog, drop by the Reference Desk, call 442-3691, or e-mail us.

February 26, 2008

Services for People with Disabilities

In 2001 the American Libraries Association stated that “libraries must not discriminate against individuals with disabilities and shall ensure that individuals with disabilities have equal access to library resources� (http://www.ala.org/ala/ascla/asclaissues/libraryservices.cfm). The University Libraries are proud to have a host of services and policies in place to provide for persons with disabilities.

As part of the University Libraries, Dewey Library also offers services and equipment specifically designed to allow all our patrons access to the library and its resources. Patrons can utilize a wheelchair elevator to enter the library from Draper Hall. Once inside the library both the circulation and reference desk are on the first floor. Since the library’s collection in on two floors, retrieval services are offered to patrons who need items located on the lower level.

Dewey Library also has a designated computer located on the first floor for users with disabilities. This computer has JAWS voice output software which allows low vision users perform computer related tasks (spreadsheets, email, surfing the web). JAWS, in addition to providing voiced readings of the information on the screen can also produce braille text of the on-screen content.

The Dragon Naturally Speaking voice command software lets the user provide voice commands rather than keystrokes or mouse clicks. Users should be aware the voice recognition software can take some getting used to – both on the part of the user and the software. Oftentimes there is an adjustment period as the program gets “trained� to your voice.

The Kurzweil Reading Edge provides users with a voiced reading of scanned materials. Users should note that scanned items must be printed text. The Kurzweil software can also convert an electronic document to other types of file formats (ex., .PDF to .doc) if necessary.

As some of these programs may be unfamiliar to people, we encourage you to consult with a reference librarian before using them. We are eager to hear how the disability services provided at the Dewey Library can be expanded or improved. Please feel free to leave a comment on this blog or contact us in person, by phone (442-3691), or e-mail with any suggestions that you may have.

Blog post written by Michael Daly.

February 5, 2008

New Look and Features to Social Welfare and Criminal Justice Subject Guides

LIbrarians who are Subject Specialsts here at UAlbany have created online guides, to help you get the "lay of the land" with regard to key library resources for your academic discipline. These guides are found on the sidebar of our Dewey pages, under the heading: My Research Subject . You will also find them in the pull-down menu of the UA Libraries' main page .

Bibliographer (also the Head of Dewey) Mary Jane Brustman has updated the Subject Guides for Social Welfare and Criminal Justice.

The guides now include information about resources relevant resources in our Special Collections Department. For example, Special Collections has an archive of materials from Neighborhood and Community Associations, which may be useful for Social Welfare researchers; and The National Death Penalty Archive, of interest to some Criminal Justice researchers.

In addition to a slightly redesigned format (e.g., the guides now display an image of a recently published work by departmental faculty), the Social Welfare and Criminal Justice Subject Guides also have a "mini-update" at the bottom listing upcoming classes and library events that pertain to the subject.

We hope you'll take a look at the Subject Guides and provide us wiith feedback -- how helpful are these guides? What can we do to make them more useful? Our purpose is to make the library easier for you to use, so we welcome your opinions.

January 28, 2008

Library Orientation Tours This Week

Now that the Spring 2008 semester is gearing up, we encourage you to come to the Dewey Library for an orientation tour. Whether you are a new or returning student, attending an orientation tour can help you learn about our great services and resources-- some of them could really help you during "crunch time" later on in the semester.

Tours are being held this week on Wednesday, January 30 at 3:30pm, as well as Thursday, January 31 at 10:00am.

Also on Thursday at 2:00pm is a workshop giving an overview of how to use Minerva, University at Albanyy's Online Catalog.

To sign up for a workshop or tour, you may register online, in person at the Reference Desk, or call 442-3691. Although we pefer you to register in advance, we will still be glad to see you if you decide to come at the last minute!

January 21, 2008

*New* Online Research Databases

The University at Albany Libraries now offer two new databases that may be of particular interest to the downtown campus community.

Public Administration Abstracts provides bibliographic information for a wide variety of topics related to the disciplne of public administration, for example: administration and economy; law, politics and society; administrative structures and organization; international relations, organizations and policy; national government; public and social services; taxation, budgeting and finance; and theory and methods. Coverage runs from 1974 to the present.

Abstracts in Social Gerontology provides bibliographic information on topics such as: elder abuse, services and advocacy for the elderly, mental and physical health issues affecting the elderly, caregiving, death and bereavement, family issues concerning the elderly, and legislation and policies affecting the elderly.

Both of these databases are replacing their print counterparts and are available from the Database and Indexes page on the UA Libraries' main web page.

Don't forget to contact us if you have questions about these new resources, or if we can help you with any other request.

January 15, 2008

Evaluating Materials from the World Wide Web

We'll admit it -- we know the first place you go when you are starting research might not be the library. It is more likely a web search engine, like Google.

To help you judge the information you find on the web, librarians Trudi Jacobson and Laura Cohen have updated a page on the library website about Evaluating Web Content. This useful tool includes special considerations for evaluating some of the newer types of web resources that are available. This page is easily found from the Instruction and Tutorials link on the library's main page.

The World Wide Web continues to be a sort of "Wild West" when it comes to the quality of information you can find. It is true that the amount of reputable, authoritative material published on the web continues to increase; however, the amount of questionable material that is available has also increased. With new formats of information, such as blogs, wikis, social networking sites, and mutlimedia resources, knowing how to evaluate material found on the web is of critical importance for researchers.

If you are not sure about the reliability of materials you have located on the Web, we are happy to assist you. And don't worry -- we won't have hurt feelings that you "googled" your topic!


November 28, 2007

New Database Trials: Let Us Know What You Think

We currently have trial access to a number of new bibliographic databases. We would like to know your thoughts on these products. Is the interface easy to use? How useful are the features of this database? Is the subject coverage adequate? Do you know of another product that would be more useful?

The database trials are located in 2 places. First, there are a numberof trials located on the Ebsco interface. To access them, go to the Database Finder and click on the word "Ebsco." On the Ebsco interface, click on the tab at the top that says "Choose Databases." The trial products are located at the bottom of this list. Some of the titles we are testing include:

  • Abstracts in Social Gerontology :
    This database covers topics such as: psychology of aging, elder abuse, society and the elderly.
  • Environment Complete :
    This database covers topics such as: energy, geography, pollution & waste management, environmental technology, environmental law, public policy, social impacts, and urban planning.
  • Gallery Watch CRS Reports :
    This database includes the full text of Congressional Research Service Reports since 1993. These reports are initially generated for Members of Congress and include nonpartisan, objective analysis and research on all legislative issues.

You can access the other trial databases from a link right on the main UA Libraries page (http://library.albany.edu), just click on the phrase "Database Trials." On this page you will find a link to Early American Newspapers, a full text collection of historical newspapers from all 50 states; as well as a number of Slavic and Russian Studies databases.

Your feedback will help us decide which subscriptions, if any, to purchase.. Most of the trials run through mid-December. Please give a "test drive" to any of these databases and leave a comment below, or e-mail us.

November 7, 2007

Never Fear, Online Encyclopedias are Here!

Often the best method to beginning research is to start by collecting background information on your topic. One familiar type of resource for getting a brief overview of a topic is, of course, the encyclopedia. Although encyclopedias still exist in print format, many are now also available electronically. Using the online versions allows you to find the same articles as you would in the print version. The benefits provided by the electronic version include: more frequent update, clickable links to cross references, and the option of saving entries in different formats. All of this lets you get to the information you need more quickly.

Most online encyclopedias are found in the Library’s online Reference Collection. Another way to narrow down the more specialized electronic encyclopedias, is by clicking on the “My Research Subject Is…� link of the library’s main page. Online encyclopedias are generally listed under the “Internet Resources� heading. Some of these subject-specific encyclopedias are not included in the online Reference section, so be sure to check both locations.

Another nice feature of online encyclopedias is that you don’t always have to search one encyclopedia at a time. The International Encyclopedia of Marriage and Family, The Encyclopedia of Child Development, The Encyclopedia of Aging, and The Macmillian Encyclopedia of Death & Dying utilize the same interface, which allows you to search all of the titles at once, or select a single encyclopedia to search. Some of the additional features of this interface include :


  • results may be downloaded in either HTML or PDF format.

  • A camera icon to the right of a result lets you know if that entry includes images.

  • Entries contain a bibliography as well a listing of related terms (“see alsoâ€?), which are often hyperlinked.

As you can see, online encyclopedias are an essential tool for today's researcher. Take a look at the many titles offered by the University Libraries, and give one or two a try. If you need further assistance or have any questions about how to use online encyclopedias, we are happy to help. Drop by the Reference Desk, call us at 442-3691, or send us an e-mail.

Blog entry created by Michael Daly

October 31, 2007

Reference Question of the Week

Q: Is there a website we can use to help narrow down research topics?

A: We would encourage you to stop by the library Reference Desk. The librarian will be very happy to talk with you about getting started on your research. Check Dewey Library Reference Desk hours to be sure the desk is staffed when you plan to arrive. Another avenue to pursue is to make an appointment with a Subject Specialist. These are librarians who have expertise about your field of interest, and can sometimes guide you in selecting at topic.

We also have an online guide called Doing Research. The first section on this page, "Research Process," is a detailed overview on ways to choose a topic for your paper.

Don't forget, most professors are also very happy to talk with you about your research topic.

October 24, 2007

Cut to the Chase using Database Thesauri

Electronic databases are a fantastic research tool. They allow one to quickly search for and find relevant articles, reviews, studies and other pieces of scholarly information. In many databases, if you are using the first term to pop into your head, or even what you consider to be the standard term(s) for a topic when searching, it’s very likely you’re missing a major piece of the puzzle. This is where a database thesaurus comes in handy.

When we think of thesauri, we usually think of Roget’s Thesaurus, which listed terms and provided their synonyms, antonyms and other related words. A database thesaurus, however, is slightly different. A database thesaurus provides descriptors, which are essentially standardized subject terms that are assigned to the records in the database. Every article covering the same topic, regardless of the various terminology used in the articles, is assigned the same descriptor.

As an example, we’ll look at PsycInfo, a popular database covering psychology and social science issues. When you access PsycInfo, (see the listing in Databases and Indexes), you will notice a “thesaurus� tab directly above the search box. Before doing a search, it is useful to check your search terms in the thesaurus.

Why is this important? Assume that you are looking for information on substance abuse. Common sense might indicate to use “substance abuse� in a keyword/subject search. However, when we enter “substance abuse� into the thesaurus you will see that the descriptor in PsycInfo is actually “drug abuse.� If you had done a simple keyword search for “substance abuse,� you probably would have come up with some results. However, if you select “drug abuse� as a descriptor from the thesaurus, you’ll receive relevant results pertaining to the topic of substance abuse, drug abuse or any other synonyms that may describe the topic.

A database thesaurus may also supply narrower or broader terms, which may help you craft a more effective search. By clicking on the descriptor “drug abuse� you will notice narrower terms such as “alcohol abuse� or “drug dependency,� and broader terms such as “behavior disorders� or “drug usage.� Using the database’s terminology for your topic helps you "cut to the chase" in terms of finding comprehensive and relevant results.

Since each database is set up slightly differently, you may wish to look for a “help� function to assist with using the thesaurus in a particular database. Unfortunately, not every database has a thesaurus, so you may have to try searching for a variety of synonyms to your topic.

If you need further assistance or have any questions about how to use database thesauri, we are happy to help. Drop by the Reference Desk, call us at 442-3691, or send us an e-mail.

Blog post created by Mike Daly

October 17, 2007

EndNote Consultations Available

The Dewey Library is now offering one-on-one consultations and tutorials to help you more effectively use EndNote, the citation management software. As of this Fall, EndNote was added to all Information Commons computers. Our Gradauate Assistant, Xiaoai Ren will be available on Thursdays from Noon - 2pm. Please stop by the Reference Desk and ask for her, or e-mail her.

October 10, 2007

"But Where Do I start...?"

That is the question in the minds of many students when they begin a research project. A great way to get started is the My Research Subject link. Here you'll find easy to use subject guides for Criminal Justice, Information and Library Science, Law, Political Science, Public Administration and Policy, and Social Welfare. While we certainly encourage you to “shop around� the library website (not to mention the library itself!), using My Research Subject can be a great place to start.

Clicking on the guide to your chosen subject, you’ll find the subheadings 1) Internet Resources, 2) Research Guides and 3) Databases.

Internet resources are free web sites that have been screened by a bibliographer for accuracy, relevancy and authority. These websites contain timely and updated information which can pinpoint current topics and trends in a particular field.

Perhaps the most usable feature of My Research Subject is the Research Guide. This outline provides you with the essential print and electronic sources you'll need to begin research. There is a quick description of each source and to save you time, call numbers and/or web links are included. Becoming familiar with the Research Guide for your discipline will save steps as you search for information on your topic.

Given the number of possibilities offered by the library, choosing which electronic databases to use can often be overwhelming. By using the Database Finder link in My Research Subject, you will be taken directly to a list of the specific electronic databases that will allow you to search most efficiently for your topic.

If you need further assistance or have any questions about how to use My Research Subject, please contact the Dewey Library Reference Desk. Drop by the library, call us at 442-3691, or send us an e-mail.

Blog post created by Mike Daly.

September 26, 2007

ILLiad Makes Requesting Materials Easy

UA Delivery and Interlibary Loan are two great ways to retreive that important, but inconveniently located item. Our system for making UA Delivery and Interlibrary Loan requests is called ILLiad. If you have never used ILLiad before, remember to set up your profile by clickiing on "First Time Users."

The UA Delivery service, (sometimes called "Document Delivery") allows you to obtain materials that are owned by the libraries. For example: you look up a journal in Minerva. You see we only have print access to the volume containing your article. Don't worry-- you do not have to make a trip to Dewey, Science or the University Library to photocopy this article! Simply log in to ILLiad, and click "Article" under "Submit a New Request." The first question will be: "Are you requesting an item owned by the University Libraries?" Select "yes" and enter the required information. Also, if your home library is the Dewey Library, you may also use UA Delivery to requests books from the uptown campus libraries, including from Storage. They will be held for you at Dewey. Usually it takes about 3 days for the book to arrive at your desginated library. You may submit up to 3 UA Delivery requests in one day.

You would place an Interlibrary Loan request when our libraries here at UA do not own the item, or it is not available. Again, log in to ILLiad, select the format of the item (Article, Book, etc.), then when the system asks you if we own the item, click "no." You do not have to tell us where to find the item, we locate other libraries in our networks, and request the material on your behalf! Depending on the item, it will be emailed to you or placed on hold at your designated pick-up library. It's best to plan ahead: many items are available from ILL within a couple of days, but it can take up to two or three weeks for some hard-to-locate items.

We are always glad to help with this process, so do not hesitate to write or call. For UA Delivery, contact the Dewey Library Reference Desk at 442-3691, for ILL, call the Interlibrary Loan office, at 442-3613.

September 13, 2007

Borrow a Laptop at Dewey

Students, faculty and staff of the University at Albany may borrow laptop computers for use within the library. These computers are available for a four hour period, with no overnight lending. Users must also comply with Library laptop lending policies information technology policies. We hope you will enjoy using the laptops and find that they provide added flexiblity when you need to work in the library.

For more information about Laptop Lending at the University Libraries, see our online information about the service, stop by the Circulation Desk at Dewey, or call 442-3693. While you're at it, you may want to look at the Dewey Library's Computer Usage Policy.

September 5, 2007

Extended Hours at Dewey Library

Dewey Library is pleased to announce new, extended hours for Fall 2007. Generally, the Library is open as follows:

Monday through Thursday: 8:00 AM - 11:00 PM
Friday: 8:00 AM - 7:00 PM
Saturday: 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM
Sunday: 12:00 Noon - 11:00 PM

For the library schedule on campus holidays, check here.

Although there will be Circulation services any time the library is open, there may or may not be a Reference Librarian available. Consult the Reference schedule for more information.

August 30, 2007

Color Printing Now Available

The Dewey Library is pleased to announce that a Color Printer now available for public use. Patrons using the Information Commons area computers may now select the color printer as an option, and pay with their SUNYCard or Podium Card. Color printouts are $0.50 per page.

The Color Printer is located on the left hand wall of the Dewey Library, between the New Books Display and the photocopier, across from the Reference stacks.

August 29, 2007

NetID: Your Gateway to Online Library Services

Access to the University's electronic resources is critical to anyone on campus, whether they are faculty, staff, or a student. Your NetID functions as the username for many University functions such as: MyUAlbany, WebCT, WebMail, and UNIX.

In addition, your NetID provides you access to many library services:


  • You can check the due dates and renew books on your MyMinerva account.
  • You can request materials through Document Delivery and Interlibrary Loan by setting up an Illiad account.
  • You can access Library databases and online journals from off campus.
  • You can use the public access computers in the Information Commons.

If you do not have a NetID or if you have forgotten your passwords, please contact the ITS Helpdesk .

August 24, 2007

SUNYCard: More than Just Identification

Your University ID, called a SUNYCard, has many functions. With the SUNYCard, a student has access to campus buildings and public transportation, and the ability to obtain meals and food.

Your SUNYCard functions as your library card as well. With it you can check out books, swipe to pay for library print jobs and photocopies, and use the bar code number to establish an Interlibrary Loan/Document Delivery account.

The Dewey Library has a Podium terminal where you can add money to your SUNYCard. It is located in the hallway across from the public rest room. In addition you can add money to the SUNYCard online.

The bottom line: it is important to carry your SUNYCard at all times!

October 12, 2006

We're Here to Help - in Person and Online!

The librarians here at Dewey can provide you with many types of assistance with your reasearch. We are glad to help you formulate a research strategy, advise on how to cite your sources, assist with interlibrary loan and document delivery requests, and help you go about identifying relevant materials to support your research topic.

Simply Walk In! The Reference Desk is located to the right of the Circulation area. A reference librarian is at the desk, ready to help you during the following hours:

  • Sunday 1:00pm - 7:00pm

  • Monday through Thursday 9:00am -8:00pm

  • Friday 10:00am - 6:00pm

  • Saturday 12:00pm - 5:00pm
  • Telephone: You can also call the Reference desk at (518) 442-3691. If a librarian does not answer, leave a message and we'll get back to you as soon as we can.

    E-mail: Other times, you may wish to send your question by e-mail. If so, use the Ask A Librarian link on the main library page (http://library.albany.edu). We endeavor to answer your questions within 24 hours of receceiving them, but most questions are answered within a couple of hours.

    October 5, 2006

    UA Delivery vs. Interlibrary loan

    With a bit of planning, you can obtain almost any article or book that you need for research. UA Delivery and Interlibary Loan are to great ways to retreive that important, but inconveniently located item. You may be wondering, "What is the difference between UA Delivery and Interlibrary Loan, and when can I use those services?"

    The UA Delivery service, (sometimes called "Document Delivery") allows you to obtain materials that are owned by the libraries. For example: you look up a journal in Minerva. You see that it is only available in print. Fear not! You do not have to make a trip to Dewey, Science or the University Library to photocopy this article! Simply log in to ILLiad, then select UA Delivery and request the article. It will be emailed to you within a day or two. If your designated library is the Dewey Library, you may also use UA Delivery to requests books from the uptown campus libraries, including storage. They will be held for you at Dewey. Usually it takes about 3 days for the book to arrive at your desginated library. You may submit up to 3 UA Delivery requests in one day.

    You would place an Interlibrary Loan request when our libraries here at UA do not own the item, or it is not available. Simply sumbit a request by logging in to ILLiad, selecting Interlibrary Loan, and filling out the request form. You do not have to tell us where to find the item, we locate other libraries in our networks, and request the material on your behalf! Depending on the item, it will be emailed to you or placed on hold at your designated pick-up library. It's best to plan adhead: many items are available from ILL within a couple of days, but it can take up to two or three weeks for some hard-to-locate items.

    We are always glad to help with this process, so do not hesitate to write or call. For UA Delivery, contact the Dewey Library Reference Desk at 442-3691, for ILL, call the Interlibrary Loan office, at 442-3613.

    August 23, 2006

    The Many Uses of SUNYCard

    Years ago, a UA ID card served little more than to confirm your current student status at the University. Nowadays, we have the SUNYCard, which serves many more functions for a UA student than mere identification.

    With the SUNYCard, a student has access to campus buildings and public transportation, ability to obtain meals and food, and in some cases the SUNYCard works like a debit card – even off campus.

    Your SUNYCard functions as your library card as well. With it you can check out books, swipe to pay for library print jobs and photocopies, and use the bar code number to establish an Interlibrary Loan/Document Delivery account.

    The Dewey Library has a Podium terminal where you can add money to your SUNYCard. It is located in the hallway across from the public rest room. In addition you can add money to the SUNYCard online here.

    The bottom line: it is important to carry your SUNYCard at all times!

    May 24, 2006

    Ask a Librarian!

    Have you tried our email reference service? Perhaps it’s because you didn’t know about the service.

  • What is it? Ask a Librarian provides answers to your reference and research inquiries seven days a week. The service is provided by librarians from the Dewey Graduate Library.

  • How do you use it? You simply click on the Ask a Librarian links that are on the University Libraries’ web pages. You’ll get to a page that offers a simple form to complete and send.

  • How fast is the service? We will respond to your query as quickly as we can. Sometimes answers are received within minutes or hours. We strive to answer all queries within 24 hours of receipt.

  • What do others think of this service? We have been collecting statistics and comments about the service for over a year. Users are overwhelmingly satisfied with the service, and many have taken the time to write positive comments about the speed of the service and the helpfulness of the librarians. We have many repeat users!
  • Want to try the service now? Here’s the direct link: http://albany.cb.docutek.com/vrlplus/vrl_entry.asp